HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Above Mean Sea Level
METRES ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL (MAMSL) or simply METRES ABOVE SEA LEVEL (MASL or M A.S.L.) is a standard metric measurement in metres of the elevation or altitude of a location in reference to a historic mean sea level . Mean sea levels are affected by climate change and other factors and change over time. For this and other reasons, recorded measurements of elevation above sea level might differ from the actual elevation of a given location over sea level at a given moment
[...More...]

"Above Mean Sea Level" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Artificial Satellite
In context of spaceflight , a SATELLITE is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit . Such objects are sometimes called ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth's Moon
Moon
. In 1957 the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
launched the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
. Since then, about 6,600 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2013 estimate, 3,600 remained in orbit. Of those, about 1,000 were operational; while the rest have lived out their useful lives and became space debris . Approximately 500 operational satellites are in low-Earth orbit , 50 are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), and the rest are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km). A few large satellites have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit
[...More...]

"Artificial Satellite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Altimeter
An ALTIMETER or an ALTITUDE METER is an instrument used to measure the altitude of an object above a fixed level. The measurement of altitude is called ALTIMETRY, which is related to the term bathymetry , the measurement of depth under water. CONTENTS* 1 Pressure altimeter * 1.1 Use in hiking and climbing * 1.2 Skydiving * 1.3 Use in aircraft * 2 Use in ground effect vehicle * 3 Sonic altimeter * 4 Radar altimeter * 5 Global Positioning System
Global Positioning System
* 6 Other modes of transport * 7 Satellites * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 External links PRESSURE ALTIMETER Digital barometric pressure sensor for altitude measurement in consumer electronic applications Altitude
Altitude
can be determined based on the measurement of atmospheric pressure . The greater the altitude, the lower the pressure
[...More...]

"Altimeter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Global Positioning System
The GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS), originally NAVSTAR GPS, is a space-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States
United States
Air Force . It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver anywhere on or near the Earth
Earth
where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS
GPS
satellites. The GPS
GPS
does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS
GPS
positioning information. The GPS
GPS
provides critical positioning capabilities to military, civil, and commercial users around the world
[...More...]

"Global Positioning System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helicopters
A HELICOPTER is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors . This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover , and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL
VTOL
(vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform. The English word helicopter is adapted from the French word hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix (ἕλιξ) "helix, spiral, whirl, convolution" and pteron (πτερόν) "wing". English language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "copter", "helo", "heli", and "whirlybird". Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight , with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61 being the first operational helicopter in 1936
[...More...]

"Helicopters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Altitude
ALTITUDE or HEIGHT (sometimes known as DEPTH) is defined based on the context in which it is used (aviation, geometry, geographical survey, sport, and many more). As a general definition, altitude is a distance measurement, usually in the vertical or "up" direction, between a reference datum and a point or object. The reference datum also often varies according to the context. Although the term altitude is commonly used to mean the height above sea level of a location, in geography the term elevation is often preferred for this usage. Vertical distance measurements in the "down" direction are commonly referred to as depth
[...More...]

"Altitude" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atmospheric Pressure
ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE, sometimes also called BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, is the pressure within the atmosphere of Earth
Earth
(or that of another planet). In most circumstances atmospheric pressure is closely approximated by the hydrostatic pressure caused by the weight of air above the measurement point. As elevation increases, there is less overlying atmospheric mass, so that atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing elevation. Pressure
Pressure
measures force per unit area, with SI units of pascals (1 Pa = 1 N/m2). On average, a column of air one square centimetre (0.16 sq in) in cross-section, measured from sea level to the top of the Earth's atmosphere, has a mass of about 1.03 kilograms (2.3 lb) and weight of about 10.1 newtons (2.3 lbf ). That weight (across one square centimeter) is a pressure of 10.1 N/cm2 or 101 kN/m2 (kPa)
[...More...]

"Atmospheric Pressure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Photography
AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY is the taking of photographs of the ground from an elevated/direct-down position. Usually the camera is not supported by a ground-based structure. Platforms for aerial photography include fixed-wing aircraft , helicopters , unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or "drones"), balloons , blimps and dirigibles , rockets , pigeons , kites , parachutes , stand-alone telescoping and vehicle-mounted poles. Mounted cameras may be triggered remotely or automatically; hand-held photographs may be taken by a photographer. Aerial photography
Aerial photography
should not be confused with air-to-air photography , where one or more aircraft are used as chase planes that "chase" and photograph other aircraft in flight
[...More...]

"Aerial Photography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
( ISO
ISO
). An implementation of the Handle System , DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL , indicating where the object can be found
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Places On Land With Elevations Below Sea Level
This is a list of places below mean sea level that are on land. Places in tunnels, mines, basements, dug holes (also with open sky), under water, under ice, or existing temporarily as a result of ebbing of sea tide etc. are not included. Places where seawater and rainwater is pumped away are included. Fully natural places below sea level require a dry climate, otherwise rain would exceed evaporation and fill the area. All figures are in meters below sea level, arranged by depth, lowest first: This list is incomplete ; you can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"List Of Places On Land With Elevations Below Sea Level" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Foot (length)
The FOOT (pl. FEET; abbreviation: FT; symbol: ′, the prime symbol ) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement . Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard . Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek , Roman , Chinese , French , and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade. Its length was usually between 250 mm and 335 mm and was generally, but not always, subdivided into 12 inches or 16 digits . The United States is the only industrialized nation that uses the international foot and the survey foot (a customary unit of length ) in preference to the meter in its commercial, engineering, and standards activities
[...More...]

"Foot (length)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surveying
SURVEYING or LAND SURVEYING is the technique, profession, and science of determining the terrestrial or three-dimensional position of points and the distances and angles between them. A land surveying professional is called a LAND SURVEYOR. These points are usually on the surface of the Earth, and they are often used to establish maps and boundaries for ownership , locations like building corners or the surface location of subsurface features, or other purposes required by government or civil law, such as property sales. Surveyors work with elements of geometry , trigonometry , regression analysis , physics , engineering , metrology , programming languages and the law . They use equipment like total stations , robotic total stations, GPS
GPS
receivers, retroreflectors , 3D scanners , radios, handheld tablets, digital levels, subsurface locators, drones, GIS and surveying software
[...More...]

"Surveying" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nonbuilding Structure
A NONBUILDING STRUCTURE, also referred to simply as a STRUCTURE, refers to any body or system of connected parts used to support a load that was not designed for continuous human occupancy . The term is used by architects , structural engineers , and mechanical engineers to distinctly identify built structures that are not buildings
[...More...]

"Nonbuilding Structure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Airplane
An AIRPLANE or AEROPLANE (informally PLANE) is a powered , fixed-wing aircraft that is propelled forward by thrust from a jet engine or propeller . Airplanes come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and wing configurations . The broad spectrum of uses for airplanes includes recreation , transportation of goods and people, military , and research. Commercial aviation is a massive industry involving the flying of tens of thousands of passengers daily on airliners . Most airplanes are flown by a pilot on board the aircraft, but some are designed to be remotely or computer-controlled . The Wright brothers invented and flew the first airplane in 1903, recognized as "the first sustained and controlled heavier-than-air powered flight". They built on the works of George Cayley dating from 1799, when he set forth the concept of the modern airplane (and later built and flew models and successful passenger-carrying gliders )
[...More...]

"Airplane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Metres
The METRE (international spelling ) or METER (American spelling ) (from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is M. The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 seconds . The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole
North Pole
. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86 . In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about  3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard , i.e. about  39 3⁄8 inches
[...More...]

"Metres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.