HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Abbey Cwmhir
Abbeycwmhir
Abbeycwmhir
or Abbey
Abbey
Cwmhir (Welsh: Abaty Cwm Hir, " Abbey
Abbey
in the Long Valley") is a village and community. in the valley of the Nant Clywedog in Powys, Wales.Contents1 The Abbey 2 Places of note 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksThe Abbey[edit] The village is named after Cwmhir Abbey, the Cistercian
Cistercian
abbey built there in 1143. It was the largest Abbey
Abbey
in Wales
Wales
but was never completed. Its fourteen bay nave was longer than Canterbury and Salisbury Cathedral naves and twice as long as that at St. Davids. It was a daughter house of Whitland Abbey, and constructed at the behest of three sons of Madog, the then Prince of southern Powys
[...More...]

"Abbey Cwmhir" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Welsh Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhys Ap Gruffydd
Rhys ap Gruffydd
Rhys ap Gruffydd
or ap Gruffudd (often anglicised to "Griffith") (1132 – 28 April 1197) was the ruler of the kingdom of Deheubarth
Deheubarth
in south Wales
Wales
from 1155 to 1197. Today, he is commonly known as The Lord Rhys, in Welsh Yr Arglwydd Rhys, although this title may have not been used in his lifetime.[2] He usually used the title "Proprietary Prince of Deheubarth" or "Prince of South Wales", but two documents have been discovered in which he uses the title "Prince of Wales" or "Prince of the Welsh".[3] Rhys was one of the most successful and powerful Welsh princes, and, after the death of Owain Gwynedd
Owain Gwynedd
of Gwynedd in 1170, the dominant power in Wales. Rhys's grandfather, Rhys ap Tewdwr, was king of Deheubarth, and was killed at Brecon
Brecon
in 1093 by Bernard de Neufmarché
[...More...]

"Rhys Ap Gruffydd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cistercian
A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (/sɪˈstɜːrʃən/,[1] abbreviated as OCist or SOCist (Latin: (Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), a religious order of monks and nuns. They are variously called the Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Bernard of Clairvaux
(though the term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland
Poland
and Lithuania), or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians
Cistercians
over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine
Benedictine
monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales
[...More...]

"Cistercian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abbey
An abbey is a complex of buildings used by members of a religious order under the governance of an abbot or abbess. It provides a place for religious activities, work and housing of Christian
Christian
monks and nuns. The concept of the abbey has developed over many centuries from the early monastic ways of religious men and women where they would live isolated from the lay community about them. Religious life in an abbey may be monastic. An abbey may be the home of an enclosed religious order or may be open to visitors. The layout of the church and associated buildings of an abbey often follows a set plan determined by the founding religious order. Abbeys are often self-sufficient while using any abundance of produce or skill to provide care to the poor and needy, refuge to the persecuted or education to the young. Some abbeys offer accommodation to people who are seeking spiritual retreat
[...More...]

"Abbey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nave
The nave /neɪv/ is the central aisle of a basilica church, or the main body of a church (whether aisled or not) between its rear wall and the far end of its intersection with the transept at the chancel. It is the zone of a church accessible by the laity.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 History 4 Record-holders 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles[2] separated from the nave by an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave, the structure is sometimes said to have three naves. It provides the central approach to the high altar. Etymology[edit] The term nave is from navis, the Latin
Latin
word for ship, an early Christian symbol.[3][4] The term may also have been suggested by the keel shape of the vaulting of a church
[...More...]

"Nave" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Daughter House
A dependency, among monastic orders, denotes the relation of a monastic community with a newer community which it has founded elsewhere.[1] The relationship is that of the founding abbey or conventual priory, termed the motherhouse, with a monastery composed of the monks or nuns of the new community, which is called the daughter house. In that situation, the abbot or abbess (or prior or prioress in those monastic congregations which do not have abbots or abbesses) remains the ultimate authority for the affairs of the dependent priory, which is considered an extension of the founding house. This relationship will end at such time as the new community becomes fully autonomous in its own right. Bonds[edit] Monasteries of nuns can make a bond with a monastery of monks or friars, preferably within the same congregation or order, whereby the two are affiliated, and the fathers guarantee pastoral care to the nuns
[...More...]

"Daughter House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Whitland Abbey
Whitland Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Hendy-gwyn ar Daf or simply Y Tŷ Gwyn ar Daf; Latin, Albalanda) was a country house and Cistercian abbey in the parish of Llangan, in what was the hundred of Narbeth, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The town which grew up nearby is now named Whitland after it. It was widely known as Ty Gwyn ar Daf, meaning White House on the Taf, in reference to the country house originally built here before it became a monastic settlement which was known under that name. It is most associated with being the place where Hywel Dda drew up his laws around 940
[...More...]

"Whitland Abbey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Madog
Madoc, also spelled Madog, ab Owain Gwynedd was, according to folklore, a Welsh prince who sailed to America in 1170, over three hundred years before Christopher Columbus's voyage in 1492.[1] According to the story, he was a son of Owain Gwynedd, and took to the sea to flee internecine violence at home. The "Madoc story" legend evidently evolved out of a medieval tradition about a Welsh hero's sea voyage, to which only allusions survive. However, it attained its greatest prominence during the Elizabethan era, when English and Welsh writers wrote of the claim that Madoc had come to the Americas as an assertion of prior discovery, and hence legal possession, of North America by the Kingdom of England.[2][3] The "Madoc story" remained popular in later centuries, and a later development asserted that Madoc's voyagers had intermarried with local Native Americans, and that their Welsh-speaking descendants still live somewhere in the United States
[...More...]

"Madog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of Powys
The Kingdom of Powys
Powys
was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
following the end of Roman rule in Britain. It very roughly covered the top two thirds of the modern county of Powys
Powys
and part of the West Midlands (see map). More precisely, and based on the Romano-British tribal lands of the Ordovices
Ordovices
in the west and the Cornovii in the east, its boundaries originally extended from the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
in the west to include the modern West Midlands region of England in the east
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Powys" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mortimer
Mortimer
Mortimer
is an English surname.Contents1 Norman origins 2 Medieval magnates 3 Other people 4 Fictional characters 5 See also 6 ReferencesNorman origins[edit] The origin of the name is Norman.[1] One version is that it derives from "Mortemer", site of the Cistercian L'Abbaye de Mortemer at Lisors
Lisors
near Lyons-la-Forêt
Lyons-la-Forêt
and close to Rouen in Normandy. The land was granted to the Cistercians
Cistercians
by Henry II of England in the 1180s. Finding the land to be a marshland area of the Lyons Forest around the running Fouillebroc stream, the monks dug out a large drainage lake and built the Abbaye de Mortemer. The ruins and lake can still be visited, and the later 16th century abbey hosts tours
[...More...]

"Mortimer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earl Of Hereford
The title of Earl of Hereford
Earl of Hereford
was created six times in the Peerage of England. See also Duke of Hereford, Viscount Hereford
[...More...]

"Earl Of Hereford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deheubarth
Deheubarth
Deheubarth
(Welsh pronunciation: [dɛˈhəɨbarθ]; lit. "Right-hand Part", thus "the South")[4] was a regional name for the realms of south Wales, particularly as opposed to Gwynedd (Latin: Venedotia)
[...More...]

"Deheubarth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Llywelyn Ap Gruffudd
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
(c. 1223 – 11 December 1282), sometimes written as Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, also known as Llywelyn the Last, or, in Welsh, Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf ("Llywelyn, Our Last Leader"), was Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
(Latin: Princeps Wallie; Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) from 1258 until his death at Cilmeri
Cilmeri
in 1282
[...More...]

"Llywelyn Ap Gruffudd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Owain Glyndŵr
Owain Glyndŵr
Owain Glyndŵr
(Welsh pronunciation: [ˈoʊain ɡlɨ̞nˈduːr]; c. 1359 – c. 1415), or Owain Glyn Dŵr, was a Welsh ruler and the last native Welshman to hold the title Prince of Wales ( Tywysog Cymru) but to many, viewed as an unofficial king
[...More...]

"Owain Glyndŵr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.