HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Abbasid Caliphs
The Abbasid caliphs were the holders of the Islamic title of caliph who were members of the Abbasid dynasty, a branch of the Quraysh
Quraysh
tribe descended from the uncle of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, al-Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib. The family came to power in the Abbasid Revolution
Abbasid Revolution
in 748–750, supplanting the Umayyad
Umayyad
Caliphate. They were the rulers of the Abbasid Caliphate, as well as the generally recognized ecumenical heads of Islam, until the 10th century, when the Shi'a
Shi'a
Fatimid Caliphate (established in 909) and the Caliphate of Córdoba
Caliphate of Córdoba
(established in 929) challenged their primacy. The political decline of the Abbasids had begun earlier, during the Anarchy at Samarra
Anarchy at Samarra
(861–870), which accelerated the fragmentation of the Muslim world into autonomous dynasties
[...More...]

"Abbasid Caliphs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
[...More...]

"Islam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Al-Khayzuran
Al-Khayzuran bint Atta (Arabic: الخيزران بنت عطاء‎) (died 789) was the wife of the Abbasid
Abbasid
Caliph
Caliph
Al-Mahdi
Al-Mahdi
and mother of both Caliphs Al-Hadi
Al-Hadi
and Harun al-Rashid. She is known for the great influence in state affairs she wielded during the reign of both her spouse and that of her sons, from 775 until 789.Contents1 Life1.1 Reign of Al-Mahdi 1.2 Reign of Al-Hadi 1.3 Reign of Harun al-Rashid2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyLife[edit] Al-Khayzuran was from Jorash, near modern Bisha, Saudi Arabia. She was kidnapped from her home by a Bedouin
Bedouin
who then sold her in a slave market near Mecca
Mecca
to Al-Mahdi
Al-Mahdi
during his pilgrimage
[...More...]

"Al-Khayzuran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Muhammad Ibn Ali Ibn Abdallah
Muhammad ibn Ali ibn Abdallah or Muhammad al-Imâm was the son of Ali ibn Abd Allah ibn al-Abbas and great-grandson of al-‘Abbas ibn ‘Abd al-Muttalib, the uncle of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad
[...More...]

"Muhammad Ibn Ali Ibn Abdallah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Talas
The Battle of Talas, Battle of Talas
Battle of Talas
River, or Battle of Artlakh (Chinese: 怛羅斯戰役; Arabic: معركة نهر طلاس‎) was a military engagement between the Arab Abbasid
Abbasid
Caliphate along with their ally the Tibetan Empire
Tibetan Empire
against the Chinese Tang dynasty, governed at the time by Emperor Xuanzong. In July 751 CE, Tang and Abbasid
Abbasid
forces met in the valley of the Talas River
Talas River
to vie for control over the Syr Darya
Syr Darya
region of central Asia. After several days of stalemate, the Karluks
Karluks
originally allied to the Tang defected to the Abbasids and tipped over the balance of power, resulting in a Tang rout
[...More...]

"Battle Of Talas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Central Asia
Central Asia
Asia
stretches from the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
in the west to China
China
in the east and from Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the south to Russia
Russia
in the north. It is also colloquially referred to as "the stans" as the countries generally considered to be within the region all have names ending with the Persian suffix "-stan", meaning "land of".[1] Central Asia
Asia
has a population of about 70 million, consisting of five republics: Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(pop
[...More...]

"Central Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Umayyad
The Umayyad Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة‎, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt Omayyad,[2] was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad. The caliphate was ruled by the Umayyad dynasty
Umayyad dynasty
(Arabic: ٱلأُمَوِيُّون‎, al-ʾUmawiyyūn, or بَنُو أُمَيَّة, Banū ʾUmayya, "Sons of Umayya"), hailing from Mecca. An Umayyad clan member had previously come to power as the third Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliph, Uthman ibn Affan
Uthman ibn Affan
(r. 644–656), but official Umayyad rule was established by Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, long-time governor of Syria, after the end of the First Muslim Civil War in AD 661
[...More...]

"Umayyad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abd Al-Rahman I
Abd al-Rahman I, more fully Abd al-Rahman ibn Mu'awiya ibn Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan
Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan
(731–788), was the founder of a Muslim dynasty that ruled the greater part of Iberia for nearly three centuries (including the succeeding Caliphate of Córdoba)
[...More...]

"Abd Al-Rahman I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Emirate Of Córdoba
The Emirate
Emirate
of Córdoba (Arabic: إمارة قرطبة‎, Imārah Qurṭuba) was an independent emirate in the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
ruled by the Umayyad dynasty with Córdoba as its capital. After the Umayyad conquest of Hispania
Umayyad conquest of Hispania
in 711–718, the Iberian Peninsula was established as a province under the Umayyad Caliphate. The rulers of this province established their capital in Córdoba and received from the Umayyad Caliphate
Umayyad Caliphate
the title of wali or emir. In 756, Abd al-Rahman I, a prince of the deposed Umayyad royal family, refused to recognize the authority of the Abbasid Caliphate
Abbasid Caliphate
and became an independent emir of Córdoba. He had been on the run for six years after the Umayyads had lost the position of caliph in Damascus
Damascus
in 750 to the Abbasids
[...More...]

"Emirate Of Córdoba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
(Arabic: الأنْدَلُس‎, trans. al-ʼAndalus; Spanish: al-Ándalus; Portuguese: al-Ândalus; Catalan: al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal. At its greatest geographical extent in the 8th century, a part of southern France—Septimania—was briefly under its control
[...More...]

"Al-Andalus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zaydi Shi'a
Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
or Zaidism (Arabic: الزيدية‎ az-zaydiyya, adjective form Zaidi or Zaydi) is one of the Shia
Shia
sects closest in terms of theology to Hanafi
Hanafi
Sunni
Sunni
Islam.[1] Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
emerged in the eighth century out of Shi'a
Shi'a
Islam.[2] Zaidis are named after Zayd ibn ʻAlī, the grandson of Husayn ibn ʻAlī and the son of their fourth Imam Ali ibn 'Husain.[2] Followers of the Zaydi Islamic jurisprudence
Islamic jurisprudence
are called Zaydi and make up about 35–42% of Muslims in Yemen, with the vast majority of Shia
Shia
Muslims in the country being Zaydi.[3][4] Zaidis dismiss religious dissimulation (taqiyya).[5] Zaydis were the oldest branch of the Shia
Shia
and are currently the second largest group after Twelvers
[...More...]

"Zaydi Shi'a" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ottoman Conquest Of Egypt
The Ottoman–Mamluk War of 1516–1517 was the second major conflict between the Egypt-based Mamluk Sultanate and the Ottoman Empire, which led to the fall of the Mamluk Sultanate and the incorporation of the Levant, Egypt and the Hejaz as provinces of the Ottoman Empire.[1] The war transformed the Ottoman Empire from a realm at the margins of the Islamic world, mainly located in Anatolia and the Balkans, to a huge empire encompassing much of the traditional lands of Islam, including the cities of Mecca, Cairo, Damascus and Aleppo
[...More...]

"Ottoman Conquest Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Idrisid Dynasty
The Idrisids (Arabic: الأدارسة‎ al-Adārisah) were an Arab-Berber[1][2] Zaydi-Shia[3] dynasty of Morocco,[4] ruling from 788 to 974. Named after the founder Idriss I, the great grandchild of Hasan ibn Ali, the Idrisids are considered to be the founders of the first Moroccan state.[5][6]Contents1 History 2 The dynasty2.1 Rulers 2.2 Timeline 2.3 Offshoots3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] The founder of the dynasty was Idris ibn Abdallah
Idris ibn Abdallah
(788–791),[7] who traced his ancestry back to Ali ibn Abi Talib[7] and his wife Fatimah, daughter of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad. After the Battle of Fakhkh, near Mecca, between the Abbasids
Abbasids
and a Shiite party, Idris ibn Abdallah fled to the Maghreb
[...More...]

"Idrisid Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
[...More...]

"Morocco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aghlabids
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance Pacification Emir
Emir
Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 19
[...More...]

"Aghlabids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ifriqiya
Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabic: إفريقية‎ Ifrīqya) or el-Maghrib el-Adna (Lower West) was the area during medieval history that comprises what is today Tunisia, Tripolitania (western Libya) and the Constantinois (eastern Algeria); all part of what was previously included in the Africa Province of the Roman Empire.[1]. The southern boundary of Ifriqiya was far more unchallenged as bounded by the semi-arid areas and the salt marshes called el-Djerid. The northern and western boundaries fluctuated; at times as far north as Sicily otherwise just along the coastline, and the western boundary usually went as far as Béjaïa
[...More...]

"Ifriqiya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.