HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

South Wales
South Wales (Welsh: De Cymru) is the region of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the north and west. The most densely populated region in the southwest of the United Kingdom, it is home to around 2.2 million people. The region contains almost three-quarters of the population of Wales, including the capital city of Cardiff (population approximately 400,000), as well as Swansea and Newport, with populations approximately 250,000 and 150,000 respectively. The Brecon Beacons national park covers about a third of South Wales, containing Pen y Fan, the highest mountain south of Snowdonia. The region is loosely defined, but it is generally considered to include the historic counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, sometimes extending westwards to include Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Primary Status
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers. The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages and from the 17th century onwards
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Great Britain Road Numbering Scheme
The Great Britain road numbering scheme is a numbering scheme used to classify and identify all roads in Great Britain. Each road is given a single letter, which represents the road's category, and a subsequent number, of 1 to 4 digits. Introduced to arrange funding allocations, the numbers soon became used on maps and as a method of navigation. Two sub-schemes exist: one for motorways, and another for non-motorway roads. The scheme applies only to England, Scotland and Wales. Similar systems are used in Northern Ireland (see Roads in Northern Ireland), the Isle of Man (see Roads in the Isle of Man), Jersey and British overseas territories. These other numbering schemes use identical basic conventions and road-sign designs.

picture info

List Of Motorways In The United Kingdom
The list of motorways in the United Kingdom is a complete list of motorways in the United Kingdom
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Roads In The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers. The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages and from the 17th century onwards
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Cardiff
Cardiff (/ˈkɑːrdɪf/ (About this sound listen); Welsh: About this sound Caerdydd Welsh pronunciation: [kairˈdiːð, kaˑɨrˈdɨːð]) is the capital and largest city in Wales and the eleventh-largest city in the United Kingdom. The city is the country's chief commercial centre, the base for most national cultural and sporting institutions, the Welsh national media, and the seat of the National Assembly for Wales
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Rhymney
Rhymney (/ˈrʌmni/; Welsh: Rhymni [ˈr̥əmnɪ]) is a town and a community located in the county borough of Caerphilly in south-east Wales, within the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire. Along with the villages of Pontlottyn, Fochriw, Abertysswg, Deri and New Tredegar, Rhymney is designated as the 'Upper Rhymney Valley' by the local Unitary Authority, Caerphilly County Borough Council
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Transport In Wales
Transport in Wales is heavily influenced by the country's geography. Wales is predominantly hilly or mountainous, and the main settlements lie on the coasts of North and South Wales, while Mid Wales is lightly populated
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

A406 Road
The North Circular Road (officially the A406 and sometimes known as simply the North Circular. Two sections at its eastern end are designated A1020 and A117) is a 25.7-mile-long (41.4 km) ring road around Central London in England. It runs from Chiswick in the west to Woolwich in the east, and connects the various suburbs in the area, including Ealing, Willesden, Wembley,Finchley, Southgate, Tottenham, Woodford and Barking. Together with its counterpart, the South Circular Road, it forms a ring road through the Outer London suburbs. This ring road does not make a complete circuit of the city, being C-shaped rather than a complete loop as the crossing of the River Thames in the east is made on the Woolwich Ferry. The road was originally designed to connect local industrial communities together in addition to bypassing London, and was constructed in the 1920s and '30s
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



A405 Road
The A405 is a dual carriageway road in Hertfordshire, England. At present, it is 4.8 miles (7.7 km) long and runs from the A41 at Leavesden Green, near Watford, to the A414 at Park Street Roundabout near St Albans
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]