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A Statue Of Zhao Tuo
A statue is a free-standing sculpture in which the realistic, full-length figures of persons or animals or non-representational forms are carved in a durable material like wood, metal, or stone. Typical statues are life-sized or close to life-size; a sculpture that represents persons or animals in full figure but that is small enough to lift and carry is a statuette or figurine, while one more than twice life-size is a colossal statue.[2] Statues have been produced in many cultures from prehistory to the present; the oldest known statue dating to about 30,000 years ago. Statues represent many different people and animals, real and mythical. Many statues are placed in public places as public art
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Statue (other)
A statue is a sculpture representing one or more people or animals. Statue
Statue
or The Statue
Statue
may also refer to:Contents1 Film and TV 2 Games 3 Music3.1 Albums 3.2 Songs4 See alsoFilm and TV[edit]fr:La Statue, a French silent film The Statue
Statue
(1913 film), a 1913 short comedy film The Statue
Statue
(1971 film), a 1971 British film comedy starring David Niven, Robert Vaughn and Virna Lisi The Statue
Statue
(Seinfeld), an episode of the U.S
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Sphinx
A sphinx (Ancient Greek: Σφίγξ [spʰíŋks], Boeotian: Φίξ [pʰíːks], plural sphinxes or sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. In Greek tradition, it has the head of a human, the haunches of a lion, and sometimes the wings of a bird. It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. Those who cannot answer its riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories, as they are killed and eaten by this ravenous monster.[1] This deadly version of a sphinx appears in the myth and drama of Oedipus.[2] Unlike the Greek sphinx, which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man (an androsphinx). In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent, but having a ferocious strength similar to the malevolent Greek version and both were thought of as guardians often flanking the entrances to temples.[3] In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance
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Venus Of Hohle Fels
The Venus of Hohle Fels
Hohle Fels
(also known as the Venus of Schelklingen; in German variously Venus vom Hohlen Fels, vom Hohle Fels; Venus von Schelklingen) is an Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
Venus figurine
Venus figurine
made of mammoth ivory that was located near Schelklingen, Germany. It is dated to between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago,[1] belonging to the early Aurignacian, at the very beginning of the Upper Paleolithic, which is associated with the earliest presence of Cro-Magnon
Cro-Magnon
in Europe. This female figure is the oldest undisputed example of a depiction of a human being yet discovered. In terms of figurative art only the lion-headed, zoomorphic Löwenmensch figurine
Löwenmensch figurine
is older
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Ancient Near East
Fertile Crescent MesopotamiaAkkadian Empire Assyria Babylonia Neo-Assyrian Empire Neo-Babylonian Empire Sumer EgyptAncient Egypt PersiaAchaemenid Empire Elam Medes AnatoliaHittites Hurrians Neo-Hittite
Neo-Hittite
states Urartu The LevantAncient Israel PhoeniciaArchaeological periods Chronology Bronze Age Bronze Age
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Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije dʒumˈhuːɾijeti] (listen)), is a transcontinental country located mainly on the Anatolian peninsula in Western Asia, with a small portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe
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'Ain Ghazal Statues
A number of monumental lime plaster and reed statues dated to the Pre-pottery Neolithic B
Pre-pottery Neolithic B
period have been discovered in Jordan, at the site of Ayn Ghazal. A total of 15 statues and 15 busts were discovered in 1983 and 1985 in two underground caches, created about 200 years apart.[3] Dating to between the mid-7th millennium BC and the mid-8th millennium BC,[1] the statues are among the earliest large-scale representations of the human form, and are regarded to be one of the most remarkable specimens of prehistoric art from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period.[4] They are kept in the Jordan
Jordan
Museum in Amman.Contents1 Description 2 Discovery and conservation 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit]The figures are of two types, full statues and busts. Some of the busts are two-headed. Great effort was put into modelling the heads, with wide-open eyes and bitumen-outlined irises
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Jordan
The Hashemite
Hashemite
Kingdom of Jordan المملكة الأردنية الهاشمية (Arabic) Al-Mamlakah Al-Urdunnīyah Al-HāshimīyahFlagCoat of armsMotto: "God, Country, King" الله، الوطن ، الملك" "Allah, Al-Waṭan, Al-Malik"[1]Anthem: The Royal Anthem of Jordan السلام الملكي الأردني Al-Salam Al-Malaki Al-UrdunniCapital and largest city Amman 31°57′N 35°56′E / 31.950°N 35.933°E / 31.950; 35.933Official languages ArabicEthnic groups98% Arab 1
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Cult Image
In the practice of religion, a cult image is a human-made object that is venerated or worshipped for the deity, spirit or daemon that it embodies or represents. Cultus, the outward religious formulas of "cult" (meaning religious practice, as opposed to the pejorative term for a potentially dangerous "new religion"), often centers upon the treatment of cult images, which may be dressed, fed or paraded, etc. Religious images cover a wider range of all types of images made with a religious purpose, subject, or connection. In many contexts "cult image" specifically means the most important image in a temple, kept in an inner space, as opposed to what may be many other images decorating the temple. The term idol is often synonymous with cult image,[1][2][3] but may be used especially[citation needed] of a cult image believed not just to depict or represent a deity or spirit, but in some sense to be one itself
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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Ancient India
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to ancient India: Ancient India
India
India
India
as it existed from pre-historic times to the start of Medieval India, which is typically dated (when the term is still used) to the end of the Gupta Empire.[1]Contents1 Geography of ancient India 2 General history of ancient India2.1 Periodisation of Indian history 2.2 Indian pre-history 2.3 Iron Age (c. 1200 – 272 BCE) 2.4 Second Urbanisation 2.5 Classical Age 2.6 Middle Ages (c
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Ancient Greece
History
History
of the world · Ancient maritime history Protohistory · Axial Age · Iron Age Historiography · Ancient literature Ancient warfare · Cradle of civilization Category PortalFollowed by Post-classical historyvte Ancient Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ἑλλάς, translit. Hellás) was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. AD 600)
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Old Kingdom Of Egypt
The Old Kingdom is the period in the third millennium (c. 2686–2181 BC) also known as the 'Age of the Pyramids' or 'Age of the Pyramid Builders' as it includes the great 4th Dynasty when King Sneferu
Sneferu
perfected the art of pyramid building and the pyramids of Giza were constructed under the kings Khufu, Khafre, and Menkaure.[1] Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization – the first of three so-called "Kingdom" periods (followed by the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom) which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile
Nile
Valley. The term itself was coined by eighteenth-century historians and the distinction between the Old Kingdom and the Early Dynastic Period is not one which would have been recognized by Ancient Egyptians
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Löwenmensch Figurine
The Löwenmensch figurine or Lion-man
Lion-man
of the Hohlenstein-Stadel
Hohlenstein-Stadel
is a prehistoric ivory sculpture that was discovered in the Hohlenstein-Stadel, a German cave in 1939. The German name, Löwenmensch meaning "lion-human", is used most frequently because it was discovered and is exhibited in Germany. The lion-headed figurine is the oldest-known zoomorphic (animal-shaped) sculpture in the world, and the oldest-known uncontested example of figurative art. It has been determined to be between 35,000 and 40,000 years old by carbon dating of material from the layer in which it was found, and thus, is associated with the archaeological Aurignacian
Aurignacian
culture.[1] It was carved out of woolly mammoth ivory using a flint stone knife
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Djedefre
Djedefre
Djedefre
(also known as Djedefra and Greek: Ρετζεντέφ Radjedef) was an ancient Egyptian king (pharaoh) of the 4th dynasty during the Old Kingdom. He is well known under his Hellenized name form Ratoises (by Manetho). Djedefre
Djedefre
was the son and immediate throne successor of Khufu, the builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza; his mother is not known for sure. He was the king who introduced the royal title Sa-Rê (meaning “Son of Ra”) and the first to connect his cartouche name with the sun god Ra.Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 Pyramid complex 4 References 5 External linksFamily[edit] He married his (half-) sister Hetepheres II. He also had another wife, Khentetenka with whom he had (at least) three sons, Setka, Baka and Hernet, and one daughter, Neferhetepes. These children are attested to by statuary fragments found in the ruined mortuary temple adjoining the pyramid
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