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7.62mm NATO
The 7.62×51mm NATO
NATO
(official NATO
NATO
nomenclature 7.62 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed in the 1950s as a standard for small arms among NATO
NATO
countries. It should not be confused with the similarly named Russian 7.62×54mmR
7.62×54mmR
cartridge, a slightly longer rimmed cartridge. It was introduced in U.S. service in the M14 rifle
M14 rifle
and M60 machine gun in the late 1950s. The M14 was superseded in U.S. service as the infantry adopted the 5.56×45mm
5.56×45mm
NATO
NATO
M16. However, the M14 and many other firearms that use the 7.62×51 round remain in service, especially in the case of various sniper rifles, medium machine guns such as the M240, and various rifles in use by special operations forces
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AA Battery
The AA battery—also called a double A or Mignon (French for "dainty") battery—is a standard size single cell cylindrical dry battery. The IEC 60086 system calls it size R6, and ANSIC18 calls it size 15.[1] Historically, it is known as SP7 (Standard Power 7) or HP7 (High Power 7) in official documentation the United Kingdom, though it is colloquially known as a "double A battery". AA batteries are common in portable electronic devices. An AA battery is composed of a single electrochemical cell that may be either a primary battery (disposable) or a rechargeable battery
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Minute Of Angle
A minute of arc, arcminute (arcmin), arc minute, or minute arc is a unit of angular measurement equal to 1/60 of one degree. Since one degree is 1/360 of a turn (or complete rotation), one minute of arc is 1/7004216000000000000♠21600 of a turn. A minute of arc is π/7004108000000000000♠10800 of a radian. A second of arc, arcsecond (arcsec), or arc second is 1/60 of an arcminute, 1/7003360000000000000♠3600 of a degree, 1/7006129600000000000♠1296000 of a turn, and π/7005648000000000000♠648000 (about 1/7005206265000000000♠206265) of a radian
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M14 Rifle
The M14 rifle, officially the United States
United States
Rifle, 7.62 mm, M14,[5] is an American automatic rifle that fires 7.62×51mm NATO (commercial .308 Winchester) ammunition. It gradually replaced the M1 Garand rifle in U.S. Army
U.S. Army
service by 1961 and in U.S. Marine Corps service by 1965. It was the standard-issued infantry rifle for U.S. military personnel in the contiguous United States, Europe, and South Korea from 1959[6] until the M16 began replacing it in 1964. The M14 was used for U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps basic and advanced individual training (AIT) from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s. The M14 was the last American battle rifle issued in quantity to U.S. military personnel. It was replaced by the M16 assault rifle, a lighter weapon using a lower caliber intermediate cartridge. The M14 rifle remains in limited service in all branches of the U.S
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M60 Machine Gun
The M60, officially the United States Machine Gun, Caliber 7.62 mm, M60, is a family of American general-purpose machine guns firing 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
cartridges from a disintegrating belt of M13 links. There are several types of ammunition approved for use in the M60, including ball, tracer, and armor-piercing rounds.[2] Introduced in 1957, it has served with every branch of the U.S. military and still serves with the armed forces of other states. Its manufacture and continued upgrade for military and commercial purchase continues into the 21st century, although it has been replaced or supplemented in most roles by other designs, most notably the M240 machine gun in U.S
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Sniper Rifle
A sniper rifle is a high-precision rifle designed for sniper missions. It serves to fulfil the tactical need for long range surveillance, effective anti-personnel and anti-materiel operations with high hit efficiency, and can be used by both military and law enforcement. The modern sniper rifle is a portable shoulder-fired weapon system with a choice between bolt-action or semi-automatic action, fitted with a telescopic sight for extreme accuracy and chambered for a high-performance military centerfire cartridge.Contents1 History 2 Classification2.1 Military 2.2 Law enforcement3 Distinguishing characteristics3.1 Telescopic sight 3.2 Action 3.3 Magazine 3.4 Barrel 3.5 Stock 3.6 Accessories4 Capabilities4.1 Accuracy 4.2 Maximum effective range5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]The British Whitworth rifle, used extensively during the American Civil War
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Medium Machine Gun
A medium machine gun (MMG), in modern terms, usually refers to a belt-fed automatic firearm firing a full-power rifle cartridge.Contents1 History1.1 Early 20th century: medium, heavy and light 1.2 Mid 20th century 1.3 Late 20th century1.3.1 Smaller-caliber light machine guns1.4 21st century2 See alsoHistory[edit]Hand cranked, multi-barrelled Gatling gunIn the late 19th century, Gatling guns and other externally powered types, such as the Nordenfelt, were often made in different ranges of calibers, such as half-inch and one-inch
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M240
The M240, officially the Machine Gun, 7.62 mm, M240, is the US military designation for the FN MAG
FN MAG
(French: Mitrailleuse d'Appui Général, English: general-purpose machine gun),[5] a family of belt-fed, gas-operated medium machine guns that chamber the 7.62×51mm NATO
NATO
cartridge.[1] The M240 has been used by the United States Armed Forces
United States Armed Forces
since the late 1970s. It is used extensively by infantry, most often in rifle companies, as well as on ground vehicles, watercraft and aircraft. Despite being heavier than some comparable weapons, it is highly regarded for reliability and its standardization among NATO
NATO
members is a major advantage. All variants are fed from disintegrating belts, and are capable of firing most types of 7.62 mm (.308 in) NATO
NATO
ammunition
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Sporting Arms And Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute
The Sporting Arms and Ammunition
Ammunition
Manufacturers' Institute (SAAMI, pronounced "Sammy") is an association of American firearms and ammunition manufacturers
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Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms And Explosives
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) is a federal law enforcement organization within the United States Department of Justice.[4] Its responsibilities include the investigation and prevention of federal offenses involving the unlawful use, manufacture, and possession of firearms and explosives; acts of arson and bombings; and illegal trafficking of alcohol and tobacco products. The ATF also regulates via licensing the sale, possession, and transportation of firearms, ammunition, and explosives in interstate commerce. Many of the ATF's activities are carried out in conjunction with task forces made up of state and local law enforcement officers, such as Project Safe Neighborhoods. The ATF operates a unique fire research laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, where full-scale mock-ups of criminal arson can be reconstructed. The agency is led by Thomas E
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.30-06 Springfield
The .30-06 Springfield
.30-06 Springfield
cartridge (pronounced "thirty-aught-six" or "thirty-oh-six"), 7.62×63mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester,[3] was introduced to the United States
United States
Army in 1906 and later standardized; it remained in use until the early 1980s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was adopted—1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6mm Lee Navy, and .30-40 Krag
.30-40 Krag
cartridges. The .30-06 remained the U.S. Army's primary rifle and machine gun cartridge for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
(commercial .308 Winchester) and 5.56×45mm NATO, both of which remain in current U.S. and NATO service
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Milliradian
A milliradian, often called a mil or mrad, is an SI derived unit
SI derived unit
for angular measurement which is defined as a thousandth of a radian (0.001 radian). Mils are used in adjustment of firearm sights by adjusting the angle of the sight compared to the barrel (up, down, left or right). Mils are also used for comparing shot groupings, or to compare the difficulty of hitting different sized shooting targets at different distances. When using a scope with both mil adjustment and a reticle with mil markings (called a mil/mil scope), the shooter can use the reticle as a "ruler" to count the number of mils a shot was off target which directly translates to the sight adjustment needed to hit the target with a follow up shot
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.300 Winchester Magnum
The .300 Winchester Magnum
.300 Winchester Magnum
(also known as .300 Win Mag or 300WM) (7.62×67mm) is a belted, bottlenecked magnum rifle cartridge that was introduced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company
Winchester Repeating Arms Company
in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed to fit in a standard rifle action. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which has been blown out, shortened, and necked down to accept a .30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet.[3] The .300 Winchester is extremely versatile and has been adopted by a wide range of users including hunters, target shooters, military units, and law enforcement departments. Hunters found the cartridge to be an effective all-around choice with bullet options ranging from the flatter shooting 165 grain to the harder hitting 200+ grain selections available from the factory
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Rifle
Evolution of the modern rifle: Top: Baker rifle, an early 19th-century flintlock rifle. Second: Pattern 1853 Enfield, a mid 19th-century caplock rifled musket. Third: Dreyse needle gun, the first standard issue military breechloading rifle. Fourth: Henry rifle, the first successful lever action repeating rifle. Fifth: Lebel Model 1886 rifle, a late 19th-century bolt-action rifle and the first to use smokeless powder. Sixth: M1 Garand, an early 20th-century semi-automatic rifle and the first to be adopted as standard military issue. Seventh: АК-47, a mid 20th-century gas-operated, magazine-fed automatic rifle. Eighth: FAMAS, a late 20th-century selective fire, bullpup assault rifle.A rifle is a portable long-barrelled firearm designed for precision shooting, to be held with both hands and braced against the shoulder during firing, and with a barrel that has a helical pattern of grooves ("rifling") cut into the bore walls
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Semi-automatic Firearm
A semi-automatic firearm, or self-loading firearm, is one that not only fires a bullet each time the trigger is pulled, but also performs all steps necessary to prepare it to discharge again—assuming cartridges remain in the firearm's feed device. Typically, this includes extracting and ejecting the spent cartridge case from the firing chamber, re-cocking the firing mechanism, and loading a new cartridge into the firing chamber
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