HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

613 Commandments
The tradition that 613 COMMANDMENTS (Hebrew : תרי"ג מצוות‎, taryag mitzvot, "613 mitzvot") is the number of mitzvot in the Torah
Torah
, began in the 3rd century CE, when Rabbi
Rabbi
Simlai mentioned it in a sermon that is recorded in Talmud
Talmud
Makkot 23b. Although there have been many attempts to codify and enumerate the commandments contained in the Torah, the most traditional enumeration is Maimonides
Maimonides
'. The 613 commandments
613 commandments
include "positive commandments", to perform an act (mitzvot aseh), and "negative commandments", to abstain from certain acts (mitzvot lo taaseh)
[...More...]

"613 Commandments" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rabbinic Literature
RABBINIC LITERATURE, in its broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history. However, the term often refers specifically to literature from the Talmudic era, as opposed to medieval and modern rabbinic writing, and thus corresponds with the Hebrew term SIFRUT HAZAL (Hebrew : ספרות חז"ל‎‎ "Literature sages," where Hazal normally refers only to the sages of the Talmudic era). This more specific sense of "Rabbinic literature"—referring to the Talmudim , Midrash
Midrash
(Hebrew : מדרש‎‎), and related writings, but hardly ever to later texts—is how the term is generally intended when used in contemporary academic writing. On the other hand, the terms meforshim and parshanim (commentaries/commentators) almost always refer to later, post-Talmudic writers of Rabbinic glosses on Biblical and Talmudic texts. This article discusses rabbinic literature in both senses
[...More...]

"Rabbinic Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gemara
—— Tannaitic —— * Mishnah
Mishnah
* Tosefta
Tosefta
—— Amoraic (Gemara) —— *
[...More...]

"Gemara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Midrash
In Judaism
Judaism
, the MIDRASH (/ˈmɪdrɑːʃ/ ; Hebrew : מִדְרָשׁ‎; pl. מִדְרָשִׁים midrashim) is the genre of rabbinic literature which contains early interpretations and commentaries on the Written Torah and Oral Torah (spoken law and sermons), as well as non-legalistic rabbinic literature (aggadah ) and occasionally the Jewish religious laws (halakha ), which usually form a running commentary on specific passages in the Hebrew Scripture ( Tanakh ). The Midrash, capitalized, refers to a specific compilation of these writings, primarily from the first ten centuries CE . The purpose of midrash was to resolve problems in the interpretation of difficult passages of the text of the Hebrew Bible, using Rabbinic principles of hermeneutics and philology to align them with the religious and ethical values of religious teachers
[...More...]

"Midrash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tosefta
—— Tannaitic —— * Mishnah
Mishnah
* Tosefta—— Amoraic ( Gemara
Gemara
) —— *
[...More...]

"Tosefta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Targum
The TARGUMIM (singular: "targum", Hebrew : תרגום‎) were spoken paraphrases, explanations and expansions of the Jewish scriptures (also called the Tanakh) that a Rabbi
Rabbi
would give in the common language of the listeners, which was then often Aramaic
Aramaic
. That had become necessary near the end of the 1st century BCE, as the common language was in transition and Hebrew was used for little more than schooling and worship. The noun "Targum" is derived from the early semitic quadriliteral root 'trgm', and the Akkadian term 'targummanu' refers to "translator, interpreter". It occurs in the Hebrew Bible
Bible
in Ezra 4:7 "..
[...More...]

"Targum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mishnah
—— Tannaitic —— * Mishnah * Tosefta
Tosefta
—— Amoraic ( Gemara
Gemara
) —— *
[...More...]

"Mishnah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Talmud
—— Tannaitic —— * Mishnah
Mishnah
* Tosefta
Tosefta
—— Amoraic ( Gemara
[...More...]

"Talmud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tanakh
Outline of Bible-related topics Bible
Bible
book Bible
Bible
portal * v * t * e The TANAKH (/tɑːˈnɑːx/ ; Hebrew : תַּנַ"ךְ‎, pronounced or ; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible
Bible
, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian Old Testament
Old Testament
. These texts are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel , Ezra and a few others). The traditional Hebrew text is known as the Masoretic Text . The Tanakh consists of twenty-four books
[...More...]

"Tanakh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Torah
Outline of Bible-related topics Bible
Bible
book Bible
Bible
portal * v * t * e The TORAH (/ˈtɔːrəˌˈtoʊrə/ ; Hebrew
Hebrew
: תּוֹרָה‎, "instruction, teaching") is the central reference of Judaism
Judaism
. It has a range of meanings. It can most specifically mean the first five books (Pentateuch) of the twenty-four books of the Tanakh
Tanakh
, and it usually includes the rabbinic commentaries (perushim ). The term "Torah" means instruction and offers a way of life for those who follow it; it can mean the continued narrative from Book
Book
of Genesis to the end of the Tanakh, and it can even mean the totality of Jewish teaching, culture and practice
[...More...]

"Torah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nevi'im
Outline of Bible-related topics Bible
Bible
book Bible
Bible
portal * v * t * e NEVI\'IM (/nəviˈiːm, nəˈviːɪm/ ; Hebrew : נְבִיאִים‎ Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(the Tanakh
Tanakh
), between the Torah
Torah
(instruction) and Ketuvim
Ketuvim
(writings). The Nevi'im
Nevi'im
are divided into two groups. The Former Prophets (Hebrew : נביאים ראשונים‎ Nevi'im
Nevi'im
Rishonim) consists of the narrative books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel
Samuel
and Kings; while the Latter Prophets (Hebrew : נביאים אחרונים‎ Nevi'im
Nevi'im
Aharonim) include the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and The Twelve minor prophets
[...More...]

"Nevi'im" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ketuvim
KETUVIM (/kətuːˈviːm, kəˈtuːvɪm/ ; Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
: כְּתוּבִים‎‎ Kəṯûḇîm, "writings") is the third and final section of the Tanakh ( Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
), after Torah (instruction) and Nevi\'im (prophets). In English translations of the Hebrew Bible, this section is usually entitled "Writings". Another name used for this section is Hagiographa . The Ketuvim
Ketuvim
are believed to have been written under divine inspiration , but with one level less authority than that of prophecy . Found among the Writings within the Hebrew scriptures, I and II Chronicles form one book, along with Ezra and Nehemiah
Nehemiah
which form a single unit entitled " Ezra–Nehemiah
Ezra–Nehemiah
"
[...More...]

"Ketuvim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Beit Yosef (book)
BEIT YOSEF (Hebrew : בית יוסף‎‎) — also transliterated BETH YOSEF — is a book by Rabbi Joseph Caro . It is a long, detailed commentary on the Arba\'ah Turim . It served as a precursor to the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
, which Rabbi Caro wrote later in his life. For more information on this book, see the section Beth Yosef (in the article Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
). This article about a Judaism
Judaism
-related book or text is a stub . You can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"Beit Yosef (book)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mishneh Torah
The MISHNEH TORAH (Hebrew : מִשְׁנֵה תּוֹרָה‎‎, "Repetition of the Torah"), subtitled SEFER YAD HA-HAZAKA (ספר יד החזקה "Book of the Strong Hand"), is a code of Jewish religious law ( Halakha ) authored by Maimonides
Maimonides
( Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe ben Maimon, also known as RaMBaM or "Rambam"), one of history's foremost rabbis. The Mishneh Torah
Torah
was compiled between 1170 and 1180 (4930–4940), while Maimonides
Maimonides
was living in Egypt
Egypt
, and is regarded as Maimonides' magnum opus . Accordingly, later sources simply refer to the work as "Maimon", "Maimonides" or "RaMBaM", although Maimonides
Maimonides
composed other works. Mishneh Torah
Torah
consists of fourteen books, subdivided into sections, chapters, and paragraphs
[...More...]

"Mishneh Torah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romaniote Jews
The ROMANIOTE JEWS or ROMANIOTS (Greek : Ῥωμανιῶτες, Rhōmaniṓtes; Hebrew : רומניוטים‬, Romanyotim) are an ethnic Jewish community with distinctive cultural features who have lived in Greece
Greece
and neighboring Eastern Mediterranean countries for more than 2,000 years, being the oldest Jewish community in the Eurasian continent. Their distinct language was Judaeo-Greek , a Greek dialect, and is today modern Greek or the languages of their new home countries. They derived their name from the old name for the people of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
, Romaioi
[...More...]

"Romaniote Jews" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italian Jews
ITALIAN JEWS (Italian : Ebrei italiani, Hebrew : יהודים איטלקים‎‎ Yehudim Italkim) can be used in a broad sense to mean all Jews
Jews
living or with roots in Italy
Italy
or in a narrower sense to mean the Italkim, an ancient community who use the Italian rite, as distinct from the communities dating from medieval or modern times who use the Sephardi or Ashkenazi rite. CONTENTS * 1 Divisions * 2 History * 3 Italian rite Jews
Jews
* 3.1 Graeco-Italian Jews
Jews
* 4 Ashkenazi Jews
Jews
* 5 Sephardi Jews
Jews
* 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Further reading * 8.1 Italian rite prayer books * 9 Discography * 10 External links DIVISIONSItalian Jews
Jews
historically fell into four categories
[...More...]

"Italian Jews" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.