HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano
The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini– Carcano
Carcano
or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano, is an Italian military 6.5 mm (.268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge, developed from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano
Carcano
1891 rifle and many of its successors. A common synonym in American gun literature is "6.5mm Italian." In American parlance, "Carcano" is frequently added to better distinguish it from the rimmed hunting cartridge 6.5×52mmR (U.S. version: .25-35 Winchester)
[...More...]

picture info

Swedish Mauser
"Swedish Mausers" are a family of bolt-action rifles based on an improved variant of Mauser's earlier Model 1893, but using the 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
cartridge, and incorporating unique design elements as requested by Sweden.[2] These are the m/94 (Model 1894) carbine, m/96 (Model 1896) long rifle, m/38 (Model 1938) short rifle and m/41 (Model 1941) sniper rifle.[3] In 1898 production began at Carl Gustafs stads Gevärsfaktori in Eskilstuna, Sweden. All Swedish Mausers were chambered for the 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
cartridge, and all Swedish-made actions were proof-tested with a single 6.5×55mm proof round developing approximately 455 MPa (65,992 psi) piezo pressure (55,000 CUP).[4][5] Swedish Mausers were manufactured by Waffenfabrik Mauser
Mauser
AG in Oberndorf a/N in Germany and in Sweden
Sweden
by Carl Gustafs stads Gevärsfaktori and Husqvarna Vapenfabriks Aktiebolag
[...More...]

picture info

7.92×57mm
The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
(designated as the 8mm Mauser
Mauser
or 8×57mm by the SAAMI
SAAMI
[2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was adopted by the German Empire
German Empire
in 1903–1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.Contents1 Development1.1 Parent cartridge Patrone 88 1.2 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
S Patrone2 Military use 3 Civil use 4 Cartridge naming4.1 Current European civil C.I.P.
C.I.P.
designation 4.2 Current U.S
[...More...]

picture info

6.5×55mm
The 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
(designated as the 6.5×55 Swedish by the SAAMI[5] and 6,5 × 55 SE by the C.I.P.[6]) is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. Other, less common names are 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
Swedish Mauser, 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
Mauser and 6.5×55mm
6.5×55mm
Krag. It was developed in 1891 for use in the new service rifles then under consideration by the United Kingdoms of Sweden
Sweden
and Norway.[7] The two nations had independent armies and consequently the normal procedure at the time was for their respective governments to use the same ammunition and then purchase small arms of their choice
[...More...]

picture info

Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
[...More...]

picture info

Krag–Jørgensen
Danish Krags: Rifle
Rifle
1889 Carbine 1889 Sniper Rifle
Rifle
1928US Krags:M1892 rifle M1892 carbine M1896 rifle M1896 cadet rifle M1896 carbine M1898 rifle M1898 carbine M1899 carbine M1899 constable carbine


[...More...]

picture info

6.5×58mm Vergueiro
The 6.5×58mm Vergueiro
6.5×58mm Vergueiro
is a centerfire cartridge designed in 1904 specifically for the Mauser-Vergueiro
Mauser-Vergueiro
service rifle of the Portuguese Army. It remained the standard service rifle cartridge until the Mauser-Vergueiro
Mauser-Vergueiro
was replaced by the Karabiner 98k
Karabiner 98k
in 1939.[1] See also[edit]List of cartridges by caliber Table of handgun and rifle cartridgesReferences[edit]^ a b Johnson, Melvin M., Jr. (1944). Rifles and Machine Guns. New York: William Morrow & Company
[...More...]

picture info

8mm Mauser
The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
(designated as the 8mm Mauser
Mauser
or 8×57mm by the SAAMI
SAAMI
[2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was adopted by the German Empire
German Empire
in 1903–1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.Contents1 Development1.1 Parent cartridge Patrone 88 1.2 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
S Patrone2 Military use 3 Civil use 4 Cartridge naming4.1 Current European civil C.I.P.
C.I.P.
designation 4.2 Current U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

8mm Lebel
The 8×50mmR Lebel
8×50mmR Lebel
(8mm Lebel) (designated as the 8 × 51 R Lebel by the C.I.P.[1]) rifle cartridge was the first smokeless powder cartridge to be made and adopted by any country. It was introduced by France
France
in 1886. Formed by necking down the 11mm Gras black powder cartridge, the smokeless 8 mm Lebel cartridge started a revolution in military rifle ammunition. Standard 8mm Lebel
8mm Lebel
military ammunition was also the first rifle ammunition to feature a spitzer boat tail bullet (Balle D), which was adopted in 1898.[3] The long-range ballistic performance of the 8mm Lebel
8mm Lebel
bullet itself was exceptional. For use in the magazine tube-fed early Lebel rifle, the 8mm case was designed to protect against accidental percussion inside the tube magazine by a circular groove around the primer cup which caught the tip of the following pointed bullet
[...More...]

8×50mmR Mannlicher
Note: Not to be confused with the French 8×50mmR Lebel cartridge. The Austro-Hungarian 8×50mmR Mannlicher or 8×50mmR M93 is a service cartridge dating back to the days of semi-smokeless powder. It was later replaced by (and many weapons were rechambered for) the 8×56mmR cartridge.[1]Contents1 History1.1 M90 1.2 M932 Current use 3 Handloading 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] M90[edit] In approximately 1890, the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Austro-Hungarian Empire
converted the older, black powder filled 8×52mmR Mannlicher
8×52mmR Mannlicher
round into a semi-smokeless cartridge, following upon the heels of France's 8 mm Lebel cartridge, the first smokeless military round. This new round was designated 8mm M.1890 scharfe Patrone or "nitro-Patrone"
[...More...]

picture info

6.5×50mm Arisaka
The 6.5×50mm semi-rimmed (6.5×50mmSR) Japanese cartridge, currently manufactured under the designation 6.5mm Jap, was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
in 1897, along with the Type 30 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine. The new rifle and cartridge replaced the 8×52mm Murata round used in the Type 22 Murata Rifle. In 1902, the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
chambered its Type 35 rifle for the cartridge as well. In 1905, the round also came to be offered in the Type 38 Arisaka
Arisaka
infantry rifle and carbine, both of which rendered the Type 30 obsolete in imperial army service
[...More...]

picture info

.303 British
The .303 British
.303 British
(designated as the 303 British by the C.I.P.[2] and SAAMI[3]) or 7.7×56mmR, is a .303-inch (7.7 mm) calibre (with the bore diameter measured between the lands as is common practice in Europe) rimmed rifle cartridge first developed in Britain as a black-powder round put into service in December 1888 for the Lee–Metford
Lee–Metford
rifle
[...More...]

picture info

7.62×54mmR
The 7.62×54mmR
7.62×54mmR
is a rimmed rifle cartridge developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the bolt-action Mosin–Nagant
Mosin–Nagant
rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet period to the present day. The cartridge remains one of the few standard-issue rimmed cartridges still in military use and has the longest service life of all military-issued cartridges in the world.[4] The American Winchester Model 1895
Winchester Model 1895
was also chambered for this cartridge per a contract with the Russian government. The 7.62×54mmR is still in use by the Russian military in the Dragunov and other sniper rifles, as well as some modern general-purpose machine guns like the PKM and Pecheneg machine gun
[...More...]

picture info

7.65×53mm Argentine
Source(s): Cartridges of the World, 11th ed [1]The 7.65×53mm Mauser
Mauser
(designated as the 7,65 × 53 Arg. by the C.I.P.)[2] is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed for use in the Mauser
Mauser
Model 1889 rifle by Paul Mauser
Mauser
of the Mauser
Mauser
company
[...More...]

picture info

.30-40 Krag
The .30-40 Krag
.30-40 Krag
(also called .30 U.S., or .30 Army) was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smokeless powder cartridge suited for use with modern small-bore repeating rifles to be selected in the 1892 small arm trials. Since the cartridge it was replacing was the .45-70
.45-70
Government, the round was considered small-bore at the time. The design selected was ultimately the Krag–Jørgensen, formally adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.Contents1 History and development 2 Rifles, handguns, and other weapons chambered in .30-40 Krag 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory and development[edit] Though the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps had adopted limited numbers of smokeless powder, bolt-action rifles, the .30-40 was the first cartridge adopted by the US Army that was designed from the outset for smokeless powder
[...More...]

.