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6.5×50mmSR Arisaka
The 6.5×50mm semi-rimmed (6.5×50mmSR) Japanese cartridge, currently manufactured under the designation 6.5mm Jap, was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
in 1897, along with the Type 30 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine. The new rifle and cartridge replaced the 8×52mm Murata round used in the Type 22 Murata Rifle. In 1902, the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
chambered its Type 35 rifle for the cartridge as well. In 1905, the round also came to be offered in the Type 38 Arisaka
Arisaka
infantry rifle and carbine, both of which rendered the Type 30 obsolete in imperial army service
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Arab Revolt
Kingdom of Hejaz British Empire Southern Rhodesia  India France  Ottoman Empire German Empire Emirate of Jabal ShammarCommanders and leaders Hussein bin Ali Faisal Abdullah Edmund Allenby T. E
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.30-06
The .30-06 Springfield cartridge (pronounced "thirty-aught-six" or "thirty-oh-six"), 7.62×63mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester,[3] was introduced to the United States Army in 1906 and later standardized; it remained in use until the early 1980s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was adopted—1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6mm Lee Navy, and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the U.S. Army's primary rifle and machine gun cartridge for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO (commercial .308 Winchester) and 5.56×45mm NATO, both of which remain in current U.S. and NATO service. It remains a very popular sporting round, with ammunition produced by all major manufacturers.Contents1 History 2 Firearms 3 Performance 4 Recoil 5 Cartridge dimensions 6 Military cartridge types6.1 United States 6.2 Commonwealth 6.3 French Union7 U.S
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Full Metal Jacket Bullet
A full metal jacket (FMJ) bullet is a small-arms projectile consisting of a soft core (often lead) encased in a shell of harder metal, such as gilding metal, cupronickel, or less commonly a steel alloy. In military nomenclature, it is often labeled ball ammunition. The use of full metal jacketing in military ammunition came about in part because of the need for improved feeding characteristics in small arms using internal mechanical manipulation of the cartridge to chamber rounds as opposed to externally hand-reloading single-shot firearms. The harder gilding was less prone to deformation than softer exposed lead, which improved feeding
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.30-06 Springfield
The .30-06 Springfield
.30-06 Springfield
cartridge (pronounced "thirty-aught-six" or "thirty-oh-six"), 7.62×63mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester,[3] was introduced to the United States
United States
Army in 1906 and later standardized; it remained in use until the early 1980s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was adopted—1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6mm Lee Navy, and .30-40 Krag
.30-40 Krag
cartridges. The .30-06 remained the U.S. Army's primary rifle and machine gun cartridge for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
(commercial .308 Winchester) and 5.56×45mm NATO, both of which remain in current U.S. and NATO service
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Imperial Japanese Army
The Imperial Japanese Army
Army
(IJA; 大日本帝國陸軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun; " Army
Army
of the Greater Japanese Empire") was the official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
from 1868 to 1945. It was controlled by the Imperial Japanese Army
Army
General Staff Office and the Ministry of War, both of which were nominally subordinate to the Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
as supreme commander of the army and the navy. Later an Inspectorate General of Aviation became the third agency with oversight of the army
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Carbine
A carbine (/ˈkɑːrbiːn/ or /ˈkɑːrbaɪn/),[1] from French carabine,[2] is a long gun firearm but with a shorter barrel than a rifle or musket.[3] Many carbines are shortened versions of full-length rifles, shooting the same ammunition, while others fire lower-powered ammunition, including types designed for pistols. The smaller size and lighter weight of carbines make them easier to handle. They are typically issued to high-mobility troops such as special-operations soldiers and paratroopers, as well as to mounted, artillery, logistics, or other non-infantry personnel whose roles do not require full-sized rifles, although there is a growing tendency for carbines to be issued to front-line soldiers to offset the increasing weight of other issued equipment
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Murata Rifle
The Murata rifle
Murata rifle
(村田銃, Murata jū) was the first indigenously produced Japanese service rifle adopted in 1880 as the Meiji Type 13 Murata single-shot rifle.[1] The 13 referred to the adoption date, the year 13 in the Meiji period
Meiji period
acco
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Imperial Japanese Navy
The Imperial Japanese Navy
Navy
(IJN; Kyūjitai: 大日本帝國海軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国海軍  Dai-Nippon Teikoku Kaigun (help·info) or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun, " Navy
Navy
of the Greater Japanese Empire") was the navy of the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
from 1868 until 1945, when it was dissolved following Japan's defeat and surrender in World War II. The Japan
Japan
Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) was formed after the dissolution of the IJN.[1] The Japanese Navy
Navy
was the third largest navy in the world by 1920, behind the Royal Navy
Navy
and the United States Navy
Navy
(USN).[2] It was supported by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service
Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service
for aircraft and airstrike operation from the fleet
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Cupronickel
Cupronickel
Cupronickel
(also known as copper-nickel) is an alloy of copper that contains nickel and strengthening elements, such as iron and manganese. Despite its high copper content, cupronickel is silver in colour. Due to the specific properties of nickel and copper alloys, they are applied in various domains of industry e.g. coin and medal minting, armaments manufacture, desalination materials, marine engineering, and extensively used in the chemical, petrochemical and electrical industries.[1] Cupronickel
Cupronickel
is highly resistant to corrosion in seawater. For this reason, it is used for piping, heat exchangers and condensers in seawater systems, marine hardware, and sometimes for the propellers, crankshafts and hulls of premium tugboats, fishing boats and other working boats. Another common use of cupronickel is in silver-coloured modern-circulated coins
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Spitzer (bullet)
The spitzer bullet, also commonly referred to as a spire point bullet, is primarily a small arms ballistics development of the late 19th and early 20th century, driven by military desire for aerodynamic bullet designs that will give a higher degree of accuracy and kinetic efficiency, especially at extended ranges. To achieve this, the projectile must minimize air resistance in flight. Bullets with a lower drag coefficient (Cd) decelerate less rapidly. A low drag coefficient flattens the projectile's trajectory somewhat at long ranges and also markedly decreases the lateral drift caused by crosswinds
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7.92×57mm Mauser
The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
(designated as the 8mm Mauser
Mauser
or 8×57mm by the SAAMI
SAAMI
[2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was adopted by the German Empire
German Empire
in 1903–1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.Contents1 Development1.1 Parent cartridge Patrone 88 1.2 7.92×57mm Mauser
Mauser
S Patrone2 Military use 3 Civil use 4 Cartridge naming4.1 Current European civil C.I.P.
C.I.P.
designation 4.2 Current U.S
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Rifling
In firearms, rifling is the helical groove pattern that is machined into the internal (bore) surface of a gun's barrel, for the purpose of exerting torque and thus imparting a spin to a projectile around its longitudinal axis during shooting. This spin serves to gyroscopically stabilize the projectile by conservation of angular momentum, improving its aerodynamic stability and accuracy over smoothbore designs. Rifling
Rifling
is often described by its twist rate, which indicates the distance the rifling takes to complete one full revolution, such as "1 turn in 10 inches" (1:10 inches), or "1 turn in 254 mm" (1:254 mm)
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7.62×54mmR
The 7.62×54mmR is a rimmed rifle cartridge developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the bolt-action Mosin–Nagant rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet period to the present day. The cartridge remains one of the few standard-issue rimmed cartridges still in military use and has the longest service life of all military-issued cartridges in the world.[4] The American Winchester Model 1895 was also chambered for this cartridge per a contract with the Russian government. The 7.62×54mmR is still in use by the Russian military in the Dragunov and other sniper rifles, as well as some modern general-purpose machine guns like the PKM and Pecheneg machine gun. Originally, the round was designated as "Трехлинейный патрон образца 1891 года" – (Three-line cartridge model of 1891)
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Semi-automatic Rifle
A semi-automatic rifle, also known as a self-loading rifle ('SLR') or auto-loading rifle, is a self-loading rifle that fires a single round each time the trigger is pulled
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Russian Military
The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation (Russian: Вооружённые Си́лы Росси́йской Федера́ции, tr. Vooruzhonnije Síly Rossíyskoj Federátsii) are the military service of the Russian Federation, established after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. On 7 May 1992, Boris Yeltsin signed a presidential decree establishing the Russian Ministry of Defence and placing all Soviet Armed Forces
Soviet Armed Forces
troops on the territory of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
under Russian control.[13] The Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces is the President
President
of Russia
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