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30 St Mary Axe
30 St Mary Axe
St Mary Axe
(informally known as the Gherkin
Gherkin
and previously as the Swiss Re
Swiss Re
Building) is a commercial skyscraper in London's primary financial district, the City of London
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Gherkin
A pickled cucumber (commonly known as a pickle in the United States and Canada and a gherkin in Britain, Ireland, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand) is a cucumber that has been pickled in a brine, vinegar, or other solution and left to ferment for a period of time, by either immersing the cucumbers in an acidic solution or through souring by lacto-fermentation
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Convection
Convection
Convection
is the heat transfer due to bulk movement of molecules within fluids such as gases and liquids, including molten rock (rheid). Convection
Convection
takes place through advection, diffusion or both.Thermal image of a just lit Ghillie kettle, note the plume of hot air resulting from the convection current. Convection
Convection
cannot take place in most solids because neither bulk current flows nor significant diffusion of matter can take place. Diffusion
Diffusion
of heat takes place in rigid solids, but that is called heat conduction
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Planning Permission
Planning
Planning
permission or developmental approval refers to the approval needed for construction or expansion (including significant renovation) in some jurisdictions.[1][2] It is usually given in the form of a building permit (or construction permit). Generally, the new construction must be inspected during construction and after completion to ensure compliance with national, regional, and local building codes. Planning
Planning
is also dependent on the site's zone – for example, one cannot obtain permission to build a nightclub in an area where it is inappropriate such as a high-density suburb.[3][4] Failure to obtain a permit can result in fines, penalties, and demolition of unauthorized construction if it cannot be made to meet code
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John Prescott
John Leslie Prescott, Baron Prescott (born 31 May 1938) is a British politician who was the Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007. Born in Prestatyn, Wales, he represented Hull East as the Labour member of parliament from 1970 to 2010. In the 1994 leadership election, he stood for both Leader and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party, winning election to the latter office. He was appointed Deputy Prime Minister after Labour's victory in the 1997 election, with an expanded brief as Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions. A former ship's steward and trade union activist, by the 1990s he was presented as the political link to the working class in a Labour party increasingly led by modernising, middle-class professionals such as Tony Blair
Tony Blair
and Peter Mandelson
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Deputy Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
(DPM) is a senior member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom. The office of the Deputy Prime Minister is not a permanent position[1], existing only at the discretion of the Prime Minister, who may appoint to other offices – such as First Secretary of State
First Secretary of State
– to give seniority to a particular cabinet minister. Unlike analogous offices in some other nations, such as a vice-presidency, the British deputy prime minister possesses no special constitutional powers as such, though they will always have particular responsibilities in government
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Court Of Common Council
The Court of Common Council
Court of Common Council
is the primary decision-making body of the City of London Corporation. It meets nine times per year. Most of its work is carried out by committees. Elections are held at least very four years
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St Andrew Undershaft
St Andrew Undershaft
St Andrew Undershaft
is a Church of England
England
church in the City of London, the historic nucleus and modern financial centre of London. It is located on St Mary Axe, within the Aldgate
Aldgate
ward, and is a rare example of a City church that survived both the Great Fire of London and the Blitz.[1] The present building was constructed in 1532 but a church has existed on the site since the 12th century
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Reinsurance
Reinsurance is insurance that is purchased by an insurance company. In the classic case, reinsurance allows insurance companies to remain solvent after major claims events, such as major disasters like hurricanes and wildfires. In addition to its basic role in risk management, reinsurance is sometimes used for tax mitigation and other reasons. The company that purchases the reinsurance policy is called a "ceding company" or "cedent" or "cedant" under most arrangements. The company issuing the reinsurance policy is referred simply as the "reinsurer". A company that purchases reinsurance pays a premium to the reinsurance company, who in exchange would pay a share of the claims incurred by the purchasing company. The reinsurer may be either a specialist reinsurance company, which only undertakes reinsurance business, or another insurance company
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London City Airport
Consortium
Consortium
of:AIMCo OMERS OTPP Wren House Infrastructure ManagementOperator London
London
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Tallinn
Tallinn
Tallinn
(/ˈtɑːlɪn/[4][5] or /ˈtælɪn/,[6] Estonian pronunciation: [ˈtɑlʲˑinˑ]; names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of Estonia. It is situated on the northern coast of the country, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, 80 km (50 mi) south of Helsinki, east of Stockholm, north of Riga
Riga
and west of Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
in Harju County
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Zurich
Zürich
Zürich
or Zurich (/ˈzjʊərɪk/ ZEWR-ik) is the largest city in Switzerland
Switzerland
and the capital of the canton of Zürich. It is located in north-central Switzerland[3] at the northwestern tip of Lake Zürich. The municipality has approximately 400,028[4] inhabitants, the urban agglomeration 1.315 million[5] and the Zürich metropolitan area
Zürich metropolitan area
1.83 million.[6] Zürich
Zürich
is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zürich Airport
Zürich Airport
and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country. Permanently settled for over 2000 years, Zürich
Zürich
was founded by the Romans, who, in 15 BC, called it Turicum
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Double Glazing
Insulating glass (IG), more commonly known as double glazing (or double-pane, and increasingly triple glazing[1]/pane), consists of two or three glass window panes separated by a vacuum or gas filled space to reduce heat transfer across a part of the building envelope. Insulating glass units (IGUs) are manufactured with glass in range of thickness from 3 to 10 mm (1/8" to 3/8") or more in special applications. Laminated or tempered glass may also be used as part of the construction. Most units are produced with the same thickness of glass used on both panes[citation needed] but special applications such as acoustic attenuation or security may require wide ranges of thicknesses to be incorporated in the same unit.A sectioned diagram of a fixed insulating glass unit (IGU), indicating the numbering convention used in this article
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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Baltic Exchange Bomb
Exchange may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Business and economy 3 Military 4 Technology 5 Art, entertainment, and media5.1 Games 5.2 Music6 Other uses 7 See alsoPlaces[edit]In the United StatesExchange, Indiana, an unincorporated community Exchange, Missouri, an unincorporated community Exchange, Pennsylvania, an unincorporated community Exchange, West Virginia, an unincorporated communityElsewhereExchange Alley, in London, United Kingdom Exchange District, a historic area in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaBusiness and economy[edit]Exchange (economics) Exchange (organized market) Exchange rate (a.k.a. foreign exchange rate), the price for which one currency is exchanged for another Bureau de change, a business whose customers exchange one currency for another Digital currency exchangers (a.k.a
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Insulated Glazing
Insulating glass (IG), more commonly known as double glazing (or double-pane, and increasingly triple glazing[1]/pane), consists of two or three glass window panes separated by a vacuum or gas filled space to reduce heat transfer across a part of the building envelope. Insulating glass units (IGUs) are manufactured with glass in range of thickness from 3 to 10 mm (1/8" to 3/8") or more in special applications. Laminated or tempered glass may also be used as part of the construction. Most units are produced with the same thickness of glass used on both panes[citation needed] but special applications such as acoustic attenuation or security may require wide ranges of thicknesses to be incorporated in the same unit.A sectioned diagram of a fixed insulating glass unit (IGU), indicating the numbering convention used in this article
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