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2A Memory Card 1ess Jeh
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the brain by which data or information is encoded, stored, and retrieved when needed. It is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If past events could not be remembered, it would be impossible for language, relationships, or personal identity to develop.[2] Memory loss is usually described as forgetfulness or amnesia.[3][4][5][6][7][8] Memory
Memory
is often understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory.[9] This can be related to the neuron. The sensory processor allows information from the outside world to be sensed in the form of chemical and physical stimuli and attended to various levels of focus and intent
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Memory (other)
Memory
Memory
is an organism's ability to store, retain, and recall information. Memory
Memory
or
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Edith Kaplan
Edith F. Kaplan (February 16, 1924 – September 3, 2009) was an American psychologist. She was a pioneer of neuropsychological tests and did most of her work at the Boston VA Hospital.[1] Kaplan is known for her promotion of clinical neuropsychology as a specialty area in psychology. She examined brain-behavioral relationships in aphasia, apraxia, developmental issues in clinical neuropsychology, as well as normal and abnormal aging. Kaplan helped develop a new method of assessing brain function with neuropsychological assessment, called "The Boston Process Approach."[2] As a graduate student Kaplan worked with Heinz Werner, and then collaborated further with Norman Geschwind and Harold Goodglass.Contents1 Personal history 2 Mentorship 3 Clinical contributions 4 Professional achievements and awards 5 Selected publications 6 References 7 External linksPersonal history[edit] Kaplan was born in Brooklyn, New York
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Arthur Lester Benton
Arthur Lester Benton (October 16, 1909 – December 27, 2006) was a neuropsychologist and Emeritus Professor of Neurology
Neurology
and Psychology at the University of Iowa.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 See also 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] He received his A.B. from Oberlin College
Oberlin College
in 1931, his A.M. from Oberlin College
Oberlin College
in 1933 and his Ph.D. from Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1935. He acquired his training as a psychologist at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic of New York Hospital. Early in 1941, Benton volunteered for service in the U.S. Navy and was commissioned as a lieutenant in the medical department. His active duty lasted until 1945, followed by many years of service in the U.S. Navy Reserve, retiring at the rank of Captain
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David Bohm
John Stewart Bell Peter SengeDavid Joseph Bohm FRS[1] (/boʊm/; December 20, 1917 – October 27, 1992) was an American scientist who has been described as one of the most significant theoretical physicists of the 20th century[2] and who contributed unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, neuropsychology and the philosophy of mind. Bohm advanced the view that quantum physics meant that the old Cartesian model of reality – that there are two kinds of substance, the mental and the physical, that somehow interact – was too limited
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Antonio Damasio
Antonio Damasio
Antonio Damasio
(Portuguese: António Damásio) is a Portuguese-American
Portuguese-American
neuroscientist
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Norman Geschwind
Norman Geschwind (January 8, 1926 – November 4, 1984) was a pioneering American behavioral neurologist, best known for his exploration of behavioral neurology through disconnection models based on lesion analysis.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Medical education and training 1.3 Career 1.4 Legacy2 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Norman Geschwind was born on January 8, 1926 in New York City, New York to a Jewish family. He was a student at Boy's High School in Brooklyn, New York. He matriculated into Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1942, initially planning to study mathematics. His education was interrupted when drafted into the Army in 1944. After serving for two years, he returned to Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1946. Geschwind changed to the Department of Social Relations and studied a combination of social/personality psychology and cultural anthropology
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Elkhonon Goldberg
Goldberg
Goldberg
or Goldberger may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Entertainment 4 Music 5 Companies 6 Science 7 Other 8 See alsoPlaces[edit]Goldberg, Germany Złotoryja, Poland (German name: Goldberg)People[edit] Goldberg
Goldberg

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Patricia Goldman-Rakic
Patricia
Patricia
/pəˈtrɪʃə/ is a common female given name of Latin origin. Derived from the Latin
Latin
word patrician, meaning "noble", it is the feminine form of the masculine given name Patrick. The name Patricia
Patricia
was the second most common female name in the United States according to the 1990 US Census.[1] It is commonly shortened to "Pat", "Patsy", "Patti"/"Pattie", "Trish" or "Trisha"/"Tricia". These diminutives are sometimes used as names in their own right
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Donald O. Hebb
Donald Olding Hebb FRS[1] (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning. He is best known for his theory of Hebbian learning, which he introduced in his classic 1949 work The Organization of Behavior.[3] He has been described as the father of neuropsychology and neural networks.[4] A Review of General Psychology
Psychology
survey, published in 2002, ranked Hebb as the 19th most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[5] His views on learning described behavior and thought in terms of brain function, explaining cognitive processes in terms of connections between neuron assemblies.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Honors and awards 4 Work4.1 The Organization of Behavior
The Organization of Behavior
(1949)5 Donald O
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Kenneth Heilman
Kenneth is an English given name and surname. The name is an Anglicised form of two entirely different Gaelic personal names: Cainnech and Cináed. The modern Gaelic form of Cainnech is Coinneach; the name was derived from a byname meaning "handsome", "comely".[1] The name Cinaed is partly derived from the Celtic *aidhu, meaning "fire".[2] A short form of Kenneth is Ken or Kenn
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Eric Kandel
Eric Richard Kandel (German: [ˈkandəl]; born November 7, 1929) is an Austrian-American[2] neuroscientist and a University Professor
University Professor
of biochemistry and biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in Physiology
Physiology
or Medicine for his research on the physiological basis of memory storage in neurons. He shared the prize with Arvid Carlsson
Arvid Carlsson
and Paul Greengard. Kandel, who had studied psychoanalysis, wanted to understand how memory works
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Muriel Lezak
Muriel Deutsch Lezak is an American neuropsychologist best known for her book Neuropsychological Assessment, widely accepted as the standard in the field. Her work has centred on the research, assessment, and rehabilitation of brain injury. Dr. Lezak is Emeritus Professor of Neurology at the Oregon
Oregon
Health and Science University School of Medicine. She favors the flexible approach to administering neuropsychological batteries.[1] Biography[edit] She holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Chicago, and earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Portland in 1960.[2][3] She modified the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning
Learning
Test by adding a 45-word list recognition trial. This version is the most widely used by clinicians.[4] In 1996, she received the Distinguished Neuropsychologist Award from the US-based National Academy of Neuropsychology
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Thought
Thought
Thought
refers to ideas or arrangements of ideas that are the result of the process of thinking. Though thinking is an activity considered essential to humanity, there is no consensus as to how it is defined or understood. Because thought underlies many human actions and interactions, understanding its physical and metaphysical origins, processes, and effects has been a longstanding goal of many academic disciplines including linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, artificial intelligence, biology, sociology and cognitive science. Thinking allows humans to make sense or, interpret, represent or model the world they experience, and to make predictions about that world. It is therefore helpful to an organism with needs, objectives, and desires as it makes plans or otherwise attempts to accomplish those goals.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Theories 3 Philosophy3.1 Mind–body dichotomy 3.2 Functionalism vs
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Benjamin Libet
Benjamin Libet
Benjamin Libet
(/ˈlɪbət/;[1] April 12, 1916, Chicago, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
– July 23, 2007, Davis, California) was a pioneering scientist in the field of human consciousness. Libet was a researcher in the physiology department of the University of California, San Francisco
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