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29th Waffen Grenadier Division Of The SS (1st Italian)
World War IIOperation Shingle PiedmontThe 29th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Italian)
29th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Italian)
also Legione SS Italiana (German: 29. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS (italienische Nr. 1/ russische Nr.1)) [1] was created on 10 February 1945 as the second SS-Division numbered 29. The first, the 29th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Russian), was disbanded. The new unit created in November 1943, was based on the Waffen-Grenadier-Brigade der SS (italienische Nr. 1). The division is also called "Italia".Contents1 Background 2 Training 3 Combat 4 Units 5 Commanders 6 See also 7 ReferencesBackground[edit] The Kingdom of Italy on 8 September 1943 signed an armistice with the Allies. In response, the German Army and the Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
disarmed Italian troops unless they were fighting for the German cause
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Battalion
A battalion is a military unit. The use of the term "battalion" varies by nationality and branch of service. Typically a battalion consists of 300 to 800 soldiers and is divided into a number of companies. A battalion is typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel. In some countries the word "battalion" is associated with the infantry. The term was first used in Italian as battaglione no later than the 16th century
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SS-Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
([ˈoːbɐɡʀʊpn̩fyːʀɐ], "senior group leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank that was first created in 1932 as a rank of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA), and adopted by the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) one year later. Until April 1942, it was the highest commissioned SS rank, inferior only to Reichsführer-SS ( Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler
or RFSS, which was the internal SS-abbreviation for Himmler)[1] Translated as "senior group leader",[2] the rank of Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
was senior to Gruppenführer.[3] A similarly named rank of Untergruppenführer existed in the SA from 1929 to 1930 and as a title until 1933
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Karl Wolff
World War I:Western FrontWorld War II:Italian CampaignAwards Iron Cross, German Cross
German Cross
in GoldOther work businessman Karl Wolff
Karl Wolff
(13 May 1900 – 17 July 1984) was a high-ranking member of the Nazi SS who held the rank of SS-Obergruppenführer
SS-Obergruppenführer
in the Waffen-SS. He became Chief of Personal Staff Reichsführer-SS (Heinrich Himmler) and SS Liaison Officer to Hitler until his replacement in 1943. He ended World War II
World War II
as the Supreme Commander of all SS forces in Italy. Wolff evaded prosecution at the Nuremberg Trials, apparently as a result of his participation in Operation Sunrise
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Anzio
Anzio
Anzio
[ˈantsjo] is a city and comune on the coast of the Lazio
Lazio
region of Italy, about 51 kilometres (32 mi) south of Rome. Well known for its seaside harbour setting, it is a fishing port and a departure point for ferries and hydroplanes to the Pontine Islands
Pontine Islands
of Ponza, Palmarola
Palmarola
and Ventotene. The city bears great historical significance as the site of Operation Shingle, a crucial landing by the Allies during the Italian Campaign of World War II.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient era2 Christian bishopric2.1 Middle Ages 2.2 World War II3 Main sights 4 Transportation 5 Twin towns — sister cities 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient era[edit] Anzio
Anzio
occupies a part of the ancient Antium territory
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Nettuno
Nettuno
Nettuno
is a town and comune of the Metropolitan City of Rome in the Lazio
Lazio
region of central Italy, 60 kilometres (37 miles) south of Rome. A resort city and agricultural center on the Tyrrhenian Sea, in the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
it has a population of approximately 46,000. Its name is perhaps in honour of the Roman god Neptune.Contents1 Economy 2 History 3 Main sights 4 Sport 5 People 6 Twin towns 7 References 8 External linksEconomy[edit] It has a touristic harbour hosting about 860 boats and a shopping center, selling everything for fishing and sailing. There is also an extensive yacht club. Nettuno
Nettuno
is the city of the D.O.C
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Army Group C
Army Group C (in German, Heeresgruppe C or HGr C) was an army group of the German Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
during the Second World War.Contents1 History 2 Commanders 3 Composition 4 See alsoHistory[edit] Army Group C was formed from Army Group 2 in Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on 26 August 1939. It initially commanded all troops on Germany’s western front but after the Polish campaign it was reduced to commanding the southern half of the western front, overseeing the frontal breakthrough through the Maginot Line
Maginot Line
during June 1940. At the end of the battle of France it moved back to Germany then – under the cover name "Section Staff East Prussia" – moved to East Prussia
East Prussia
on 20 April 1941
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SS-Oberführer
Oberführer
Oberführer
([ˈoːbɐ.fyːʀɐ], "senior leader") was an early paramilitary rank of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) dating back to 1921. Translated as "senior leader", an Oberführer
Oberführer
was typically a NSDAP member in charge of a group of paramilitary units in a particular geographical region.[1] From 1921 to 1925, the phrase Oberführer
Oberführer
was used as a title in the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA), but became an actual SA rank after 1926. Oberführer
Oberführer
was also a rank of the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS, at that time a branch of the SA), established in 1925 as Gauführer, a rank for SS officers in charge of SS personnel in the several Gaue throughout Germany; in 1928 the rank was renamed Oberführer, and used of the commanders of the three regional SS-Oberführerbereiche
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Resistenza
The Italian resistance movement (Italian: Resistenza italiana or just la Resistenza) is an umbrella term for resistance groups that opposed the occupying German forces and the Italian Fascist puppet regime of the Italian Social Republic during the later years of World War II. It was formed by Italians of any age, gender, political opinion and social class, following the Allied invasion of the country, the armistice between Italy and Allied armed forces, and German military occupation of northern Italy. The movement is also known as the Italian resistance and the Italian partisans (partigiani in Italian). The brutal conflict they took part in is referred to as the Italian Liberation War (when referring to the part they took in the Italian Campaign against the Axis) or as the Italian Civil War (when referring specifically to the conflict with the Fascists)
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Fasces
Fasces
Fasces
(/ˈfæsiːz/, (Italian: Fasci, Latin pronunciation: [ˈfa.skeːs], a plurale tantum, from the Latin word fascis, meaning "bundle")[1] is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe with its blade emerging. The fasces had its origin in the Etruscan civilization
Etruscan civilization
and was passed on to ancient Rome, where it symbolized a magistrate's power and jurisdiction. The axe originally associated with the symbol, the Labrys
Labrys
(Greek: λάβρυς, lábrys) the double-bitted axe, originally from Crete, is one of the oldest symbols of Greek civilization. To the Romans, it was known as a bipennis.[2] Commonly, the symbol was associated with female divinities, from prehistoric through historic times.[citation needed] The image has survived in the modern world as a representation of magisterial or collective power, law and governance
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Piemont
Piedmont
Piedmont
(/ˈpiːdmɒnt/ PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont; French: Piémont) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country.[3] It borders the Liguria
Liguria
region to the south, the Lombardy
Lombardy
and Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
regions to the east and the Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
region to the northwest; it also borders France
France
to the west and Switzerland
Switzerland
to the northeast. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4,396,293 as of 31 July 2016
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Gorgonzola, Milan
Gorgonzola (Lombard: Gorgonzoeula [ɡurɡũˈzøːla]) is an Italian town of 20,042 inhabitants in the Metropolitan City of Milan, Lombardy
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Lombardy
Lombardy
Lombardy
(/ˈlɒmbərdi/ LOM-bər-dee; Italian: Lombardia [lombarˈdiːa]; Lombard: Lumbardia, pronounced: (Western Lombard) [lumbarˈdiːa], (Eastern Lombard) [lombarˈdeːa]) is one of the twenty administrative regions of Italy, in the northwest of the country, with an area of 23,844 square kilometres (9,206 sq mi)
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Panzerjäger
Panzerjäger
Panzerjäger
(German "armour-hunters" or "tank-hunters", abbreviated to Pz.Jg. in German) was a branch of service of the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
during the Second World War. It was an anti-tank arm-of-service that operated anti-tank artillery, and made exclusive use of the tank destroyers, which were also named Panzerjäger
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