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1993–94 Nba Season
A SEASON is a division of the year marked by changes in weather , ecology , and amount of daylight . Seasons result from Earth\'s orbit around the Sun
Sun
and Earth
Earth
's axial tilt relative to the ecliptic plane. In temperate and polar regions, the seasons are marked by changes in the intensity of sunlight that reaches the Earth's surface, variations of which may cause animals to undergo hibernation or to migrate, and plants to be dormant. Red and green trees in autumn (fall) During May, June, and July, the Northern Hemisphere is exposed to more direct sunlight because the hemisphere faces the Sun. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere in November, December, and January. It is Earth's axial tilt that causes the Sun
Sun
to be higher in the sky during the summer months , which increases the solar flux . However, due to seasonal lag , June, July, and August are the warmest months in the Northern Hemisphere while December, January, and February are the warmest months in the Southern Hemisphere. In temperate and subpolar regions, four calendar -based seasons are generally recognized: _spring _, _summer _, _autumn _ or _fall_, and _winter _. Ecologists often use a six-season model for temperate climate regions: _prevernal_, _vernal_, _estival_, _serotinal_, _autumnal_, and _hibernal_
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Nature
NATURE, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or universe . "Nature" can refer to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. The study of nature is a large part of science . Although humans are part of nature, human activity is often understood as a separate category from other natural phenomena. The word _nature_ is derived from the Latin word _natura_, or "essential qualities, innate disposition", and in ancient times, literally meant "birth". _Natura_ is a Latin translation of the Greek word _physis _ (φύσις), which originally related to the intrinsic characteristics that plants, animals, and other features of the world develop of their own accord. The concept of nature as a whole, the physical universe , is one of several expansions of the original notion; it began with certain core applications of the word φύσις by pre-Socratic philosophers, and has steadily gained currency ever since. This usage continued during the advent of modern scientific method in the last several centuries. Within the various uses of the word today, "nature" often refers to geology and wildlife . Nature can refer to the general realm of living plants and animals, and in some cases to the processes associated with inanimate objects–the way that particular types of things exist and change of their own accord, such as the weather and geology of the Earth
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Weather
WEATHER is the state of the atmosphere , to the degree that it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy. Most weather phenomena occur in the lowest level of the atmosphere, the troposphere , just below the stratosphere . Weather
Weather
refers to day-to-day temperature and precipitation activity, whereas climate is the term for the averaging of atmospheric conditions over longer periods of time. When used without qualification, "weather" is generally understood to mean the weather of Earth
Earth
. Weather
Weather
is driven by air pressure, temperature and moisture differences between one place and another. These differences can occur due to the sun's angle at any particular spot, which varies with latitude . The strong temperature contrast between polar and tropical air gives rise to the largest scale atmospheric circulations : the Hadley Cell, the Ferrel Cell, the Polar Cell, and the jet stream . Weather
Weather
systems in the mid-latitudes , such as extratropical cyclones , are caused by instabilities of the jet stream flow. Because the Earth's axis is tilted relative to its orbital plane, sunlight is incident at different angles at different times of the year. On Earth's surface, temperatures usually range ±40 °C (−40 °F to 100 °F) annually
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Winter
WINTER is the coldest season of the year in polar and temperate climates , between autumn and spring . Winter is caused by the axis of the Earth in that hemisphere being oriented away from the Sun . Different cultures define different dates as the start of winter, and some use a definition based on weather. When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere , it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere , and vice versa. In many regions, winter is associated with snow and freezing temperatures. The moment of winter solstice is when the sun's elevation with respect to the North or South Pole is at its most negative value (that is, the sun is at its farthest below the horizon as measured from the pole), meaning this day will have the shortest day and the longest night. The earliest sunset and latest sunrise dates outside the polar regions differ from the date of the winter solstice, however, and these depend on latitude, due to the variation in the solar day throughout the year caused by the Earth's elliptical orbit (see earliest and latest sunrise and sunset )
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Spring (season)
SPRING is one of the four conventional temperate seasons , following winter and preceding summer . There are various technical definitions of spring, but local usage of the term varies according to local climate, cultures and customs. When it is spring in the Northern Hemisphere , it will be autumn in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
and vice versa. At the spring equinox , days are approximately 12 hours long with day length increasing as the season progresses. Spring and "springtime" refer to the season, and also to ideas of rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection and regrowth. Subtropical and tropical areas have climates better described in terms of other seasons, e.g. dry or wet, monsoonal or cyclonic. Often, cultures have locally defined names for seasons which have little equivalence to the terms originating in Europe. Spring is the time when many plants begin to grow and flower
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Summer
SUMMER is the hottest of the four temperate seasons , falling between spring and autumn . At the summer solstice , the days are longest and the nights are shortest, with day-length decreasing as the season progresses after the solstice. The date of the beginning of summer varies according to climate , tradition and culture. When it is summer in the Northern Hemisphere , it is winter in the Southern Hemisphere , and vice versa. CONTENTS * 1 Summer timing * 2 Weather * 3 Holidays * 3.1 School breaks * 3.2 Public holidays * 4 Activities * 5 See also * 6 References SUMMER TIMINGFrom an astronomical view, the equinoxes and solstices would be the middle of the respective seasons, but sometimes astronomical summer is defined as starting at the solstice, the time of maximal insolation , or on the traditional date of June 21. A variable seasonal lag means that the meteorological center of the season, which is based on average temperature patterns, occurs several weeks after the time of maximal insolation. The meteorological convention is to define summer as comprising the months of June, July, and August in the northern hemisphere and the months of December, January, and February in the southern hemisphere. Under meteorological definitions, all seasons are arbitrarily set to start at the beginning of a calendar month and end at the end of a month
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Autumn
AUTUMN ( British English ) or FALL ( American English ) is one of the four temperate seasons . Autumn marks the transition from summer to winter , in September ( Northern Hemisphere ) or March (Southern Hemisphere ), when the arrival of night becomes noticeably earlier and the arrival of day becomes noticeably later, and the temperature cools down considerably. One of its main features is the shedding of leaves from deciduous trees . Some cultures regard the autumnal equinox as "mid-autumn", while others with a longer temperature lag treat it as the start of autumn. Meteorologists (and most of the temperate countries in the southern hemisphere) use a definition based on months, with autumn being September, October and November in the northern hemisphere, and March, April and May in the southern hemisphere. In North America , autumn is usually considered to start with the September equinox (21 to 24 September) and end with the winter solstice (21 or 22 December). Popular culture in North America associates Labor Day , the first Monday in September, as the end of summer and the start of autumn; certain summer traditions, such as wearing white, are discouraged after that date. As daytime and nighttime temperatures decrease, trees shed their leaves. In traditional East Asian solar term , autumn starts on or around 8 August and ends on or about 7 November
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Tropics
The TROPICS are a region of the Earth
Earth
surrounding the Equator
Equator
. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′13.2″ (or 23.437°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn in the Southern Hemisphere at 23°26′13.2″ (or 23.437°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the TROPICAL ZONE and the TORRID ZONE (see geographical zone ). The tropics include all the areas on the Earth
Earth
where the Sun
Sun
contacts the zenith , a point directly overhead, at least once during the solar year (which is a subsolar point ). The tropics are distinguished from the other climatic and biomatic regions of Earth, which are the middle latitudes and the polar regions on either side of the equatorial zone. The Tropics
Tropics
comprise 40% of the Earth's surface area and contain 36% of the Earth's landmass . As of 2014 , the region is home to 40% of the world population , and this figure is projected to reach 50% by the late 2030s. CONTENTS * 1 Seasons and climate * 2 Ecosystems * 3 Tropicality * 4 Gallery * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links SEASONS AND CLIMATE Main articles: Tropical climate and Wet season A graph showing the zonally averaged monthly precipitation
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Dry Season
The DRY SEASON is a yearly period of low rainfall, especially in the tropics . The weather in the tropics is dominated by the tropical rain belt , which moves from the northern to the southern tropics and back over the course of the year. The tropical rain belt lies in the southern hemisphere roughly from October to March; during that time the northern tropics have a dry season with sparser precipitation , and days are typically sunny throughout. From April to September, the rain belt lies in the northern hemisphere, and the southern tropics have their dry season. Under the Köppen climate classification , for tropical climates , a dry season month is defined as a month when average precipitation is below 60 millimetres (2.4 in). The dry season has low humidity, and some watering holes and rivers dry up. This lack of water (and hence of food) may force many grazing animals to migrate to more fertile spots. Examples of such animals are zebras , elephants , and wildebeest . Because of the lack of water in the plants, bushfires are common
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Wet Season
The RAINY SEASON, or MONSOON SEASON, is the time of year when most of a region's average annual rainfall occurs. It usually lasts one or more months. The term "GREEN SEASON" is also sometimes used as a euphemism by tourist authorities. Areas with wet seasons are dispersed across portions of the tropics and subtropics . Under the Köppen climate classification , for tropical climates , a wet season month is defined as a month where average precipitation is 60 millimetres (2.4 in) or more. In contrast to areas with savanna climates and monsoon regimes, Mediterranean climates have wet winters and dry summers. Dry and rainy months are characteristic of tropical seasonal forests : in contrast to tropical rainforests , which do not have dry or wet seasons, since their rainfall is equally distributed throughout the year. Some areas with pronounced rainy seasons will see a break in rainfall mid-season, when the intertropical convergence zone or monsoon trough moves to higher latitudes in the middle of the warm season. When the wet season occurs during a warm season, or summer , precipitation falls mainly during the late afternoon and early evening . In the wet season, air quality improves, fresh water quality improves, and vegetation grows substantially, leading to crop yields late in the season. Rivers overflow their banks, and some animals retreat to higher ground. Soil nutrients diminish and erosion increases
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Storm
A STORM is any disturbed state of an environment or astronomical body's atmosphere especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather . It may be marked by significant disruptions to normal conditions such as strong wind , Tornado es, hail , thunder and lightning (a thunderstorm ), heavy precipitation (snowstorm , rainstorm), heavy freezing rain (ice storm ), strong winds (tropical cyclone , windstorm), or wind transporting some substance through the atmosphere as in a dust storm , blizzard , sandstorm, etc. Storms have the potential to harm lives and property via storm surge , heavy rain or snow causing flooding or road impassibility, lightning , wildfires , and vertical wind shear ; however, systems with significant rainfall and duration help alleviate drought in places they move through. Heavy snowfall can allow special recreational activities to take place which would not be possible otherwise, such as skiing and snowmobiling. Desert storms are often accompanied by violent winds, and pass rapidly. The English word comes from Proto-Germanic _*sturmaz_ meaning "noise, tumult". Lightning storm, Port-la-Nouvelle
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Cloud
In meteorology , a CLOUD is an aerosol comprising a visible mass of minute liquid droplets , frozen crystals , or particles suspended in the atmosphere above the surface of a planetary body. The droplets and crystals may be made of water or various chemicals. On Earth, clouds are formed as a result of saturation of the air when it is cooled to its dew point , or when it gains sufficient moisture (usually in the form of water vapor ) from an adjacent source to raise the dew point to the ambient temperature. They are seen in the Earth's homosphere (which includes the troposphere , stratosphere , and mesosphere ). NEPHOLOGY is the science of clouds which is undertaken in the cloud physics branch of meteorology . There are two methods of naming clouds in their respective layers of the atmosphere; Latin
Latin
and common. Cloud
Cloud
types in the troposphere , the atmospheric layer closest to Earth's surface, have Latin
Latin
names due to the universal adaptation of Luke Howard 's nomenclature . Formally proposed in 1802, it became the basis of a modern international system that classifies clouds into five physical _forms_ and three altitude levels (formerly known as _étages_ )
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Cumulonimbus Cloud
CUMULONIMBUS, from the Latin cumulus ("heap") and nimbus ("rainstorm", "storm cloud"), is a dense towering vertical cloud associated with thunderstorms and atmospheric instability , forming from water vapor carried by powerful upward air currents. If observed during a storm, these clouds may be referred to as thunderheads. Cumulonimbus can form alone, in clusters, or along cold front squall lines . These clouds are capable of producing lightning and other dangerous severe weather, such as tornadoes . Cumulonimbus progress from overdeveloped cumulus congestus clouds and may further develop as part of a supercell . Cumulonimbus is abbreviated CB. CONTENTS* 1 Appearance * 1.1 Species * 1.2 Supplementary features * 1.2.1 Accessory clouds * 1.2.2 Supplementary features * 1.2.3 Precipitation-based supplementary features * 2 Effects * 3 Life cycle or stages * 4 Cloud types * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links APPEARANCETowering cumulonimbus clouds are typically accompanied by smaller cumulus clouds. The cumulonimbus base may extend several miles across and occupy low to middle altitudes- formed at altitude from approximately 200 to 4,000 m (700 to 10,000 ft). Peaks typically reach to as much as 40,000 ft (12,000 m), with extreme instances as high as 70,000 ft (21,000 m) or more
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Arcus Cloud
An ARCUS CLOUD is a low, horizontal cloud formation, usually appearing as an accessory cloud to a cumulonimbus . ROLL CLOUDS and SHELF CLOUDS are the two main types of arcus. Arcus clouds most frequently form along the leading edge or "gust fronts" of thunderstorm outflow ; some of the most dramatic arcus formations mark the gust fronts of derecho -producing convective systems. Roll clouds also may arise in the absence of thunderstorms, forming along the shallow cold air currents of some sea breeze boundaries and cold fronts . CONTENTS* 1 Types * 1.1 Shelf cloud * 1.2 Roll cloud * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links TYPESSHELF CLOUD A time-lapse photography of shelf cloud just before a thunderstorm in Pondicherry , Puducherry , India A shelf cloud over Enschede , Netherlands A SHELF CLOUD is a low, horizontal, wedge-shaped arcus cloud. A shelf cloud is attached to the base of the parent cloud , which is usually a thunderstorm, but could form on any type of convective clouds. Rising cloud motion often can be seen in the leading (outer) part of the shelf cloud, while the underside often appears turbulent and wind-torn. Cool, sinking air from a storm cloud 's downdraft spreads out across the land surface, with the leading edge called a gust front . This outflow cuts under warm air being drawn into the storm's updraft
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Downburst
A DOWNBURST is a strong ground-level wind system that emanates from a point source above and blows radially , that is, in a straight line in all directions, from the point of contact at ground level. Often producing damaging winds, it may be confused with a tornado , where high-velocity winds circle a central area, and air moves inward and upward; by contrast, in a downburst, winds are directed downward and then outward from the surface landing point. Downbursts are created by an area of significantly rain-cooled air that, after reaching ground level, spreads out in all directions producing strong winds. DRY DOWNBURSTS are associated with thunderstorms with very little rain, while WET DOWNBURSTS are created by thunderstorms with high amounts of rainfall. Microbursts and MACROBURSTS are downbursts at very small and larger scales respectively. Another variety, the heat burst , is created by vertical currents on the backside of old outflow boundaries and squall lines where rainfall is lacking. Heat bursts generate significantly higher temperatures due to the lack of rain-cooled air in their formation. Downbursts create vertical wind shear or microbursts , which is dangerous to aviation
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