HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

1950 United States Census
The Seventeenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1950 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]address whether house is on a farm name relationship to head of household race sex age marital status birthplace if foreign born, whether naturalized employment status hours worked in week occupation, industry and class of workerIn addition, a sample of individuals were asked additional questions covering income, marital history, fertility, and other topics
[...More...]

Enumeration
An enumeration is a complete, ordered listing of all the items in a collection. The term is commonly used in mathematics and computer science to refer to a listing of all of the elements of a set. The precise requirements for an enumeration (for example, whether the set must be finite, or whether the list is allowed to contain repetitions) depend on the discipline of study and the context of a given problem. Some sets can be enumerated by means of a natural ordering (such as 1, 2, 3, 4, ... for the set of positive integers), but in other cases it may be necessary to impose a (perhaps arbitrary) ordering
[...More...]

Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) is the world's largest individual-level population database. IPUMS consists of microdata samples from United States
United States
(IPUMS-USA) and international (IPUMS-International) census records. The records are converted into a consistent format and made available to researchers through a web-based data dissemination system. IPUMS is housed at the Minnesota Population Center, an interdisciplinary research center at the University of Minnesota, under the direction of Professor Steven Ruggles. Description[edit] IPUMS draws on every surviving United States
United States
census from 1850 to 2000 (the 1890 census is missing because it was destroyed in a fire) and from the American Community Survey
American Community Survey
since 2000 and the Current Population Survey since 1962
[...More...]

Microdata (statistics)
In the study of survey and census data, microdata is information at the level of individual respondents.[1] For instance, a national census might collect age, home address, educational level, employment status, and many other variables, recorded separately for every person who responds; this is microdata. Advantages[edit] Survey/census results are most commonly published as aggregates (e.g. a regional-level employment rate), both for privacy reasons and because of the large quantities of data involved; microdata for one census can easily contain millions of records, each with several dozen data items. However, summarizing results to an aggregate level results in information loss. For instance, if statistics for education and employment are aggregated separately, they cannot be used to explore a relationship between these two variables
[...More...]

Aggregate Data
In statistics, aggregate data are data combined from several measurements. When data are aggregated, groups of observations are replaced with summary statistics based on those observations.[1] In a data warehouse, the use of aggregate data dramatically reduces the time to query large sets of data. Developers pre-summarize queries that are regularly used, such as Weekly Sales across several dimensions such as by item hierarchy or geographical hierarchy. In economics, aggregate data or data aggregates are high-level data that are composed from a multitude or combination of other more individual data, such as:in macroeconomics, data such as the overall price level or overall inflation rate; and in microeconomics, data of an entire sector of an economy composed of many firms, or of all households in a city or region.References[edit]^ Aggregation and Restructuring of data (chapter 5.6 from the book "R in Action", Manning Publications)This statistics-related article is a stub
[...More...]

picture info

National Historical Geographic Information System
The National Historical Geographic Information System
Geographic Information System
(NHGIS) is a historical GIS project to create and freely disseminate a database incorporating all available aggregate census information for the United States between 1790 and 2010. The project has created one of the largest collections in the world of statistical census information, much of which was not previously available to the research community because of legacy data formats and differences between metadata formats. The statistical and geographic data are disseminated free of charge through a sophisticated online data access system.[1] In addition, NHGIS has created historical and contemporary cartographic boundary shapefiles compatible with every census, and over 50 million lines of metadata describing the collection. Historical U.S. state and county boundaries are available 1790–present, with smaller geographies available as the U.S. Census Bureau created them
[...More...]

picture info

Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
(/ˌmɪnɪˈsoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and northern regions of the United States. Minnesota
Minnesota
was admitted as the 32nd U.S. state
U.S. state
on May 11, 1858, created from the eastern half of the Minnesota
Minnesota
Territory. The state has a large number of lakes, and is known by the slogan "Land of 10,000 Lakes". Its official motto is L'Étoile du Nord
L'Étoile du Nord
(French: Star of the North). Minnesota
Minnesota
is the 12th largest in area and the 22nd most populous of the U.S
[...More...]

picture info

New York (state)
New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018,[6] it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City, makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
[...More...]

picture info

West Virginia
West Virginia
Virginia
/- vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen) is a state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States.[7][8][9][10][11] It is bordered by Virginia
Virginia
to the southeast, Kentucky
Kentucky
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the northwest, and Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and Maryland
Maryland
to the northeast. West Virginia
Virginia
is the 10th smallest by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston. West Virginia
Virginia
became a state following the Wheeling Conventions of 1861, after the American Civil War
American Civil War
had begun
[...More...]

picture info

Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
(/ˈaɪ.əwə/ ( listen))[6][7][8] is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern United States, bordered by the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to the east and the Missouri
Missouri
and Big Sioux
Sioux
rivers to the west
[...More...]

picture info

Washington (state)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ (listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named for George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital; the state's largest city is Seattle. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. Washington is the 18th largest state, with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state, with more than 7.4 million people
[...More...]

picture info

Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 k
[...More...]

picture info

Oklahoma
English ( Choctaw
Choctaw
official within Choctaw
Choctaw
Nation,
[...More...]

picture info

Mississippi
Mississippi
Mississippi
(/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpi/ ( listen)) is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico. Its western border is formed by the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The state has a population of approximately 3 million. It is the 32nd most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. Located in the center of the state, Jackson is the state capital and largest city, with a population of approximately 175,000 people. The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta
Mississippi Delta
area, between the Mississippi
Mississippi
and Yazoo rivers. Before the American Civil War, most development in the state was along riverfronts, where slaves worked on cotton plantations. After the war, the bottomlands to the interior were cleared, mostly by freedmen
[...More...]

picture info

South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States. The state is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the south and west by Georgia, across the Savannah River, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state. Its GDP
GDP
as of 2013 was $183.6 billion, with an annual growth rate of 3.13%.[6] South Carolina
South Carolina
is composed of 46 counties
[...More...]

.