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1925 Serum Run To Nome
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska
Alaska
by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 miles (1,085 km) in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic. Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States. Balto, the lead sled dog on the final stretch into Nome, became the most famous canine celebrity of the era after Rin Tin Tin, and his statue is a popular tourist attraction in both New York City's Central Park
Central Park
and downtown Anchorage, Alaska. The publicity also helped spur an inoculation campaign in the U.S
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Diphtheria
Diphtheria
Diphtheria
is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae.[1] Signs and symptoms may vary from mild to severe.[2] They usually start two to five days after exposure.[1] Symptoms often come on fairly gradually, beginning with a sore throat and fever.[2] In severe cases, a grey or white patch develops in the throat.[1][2] This can block the airway and create a barking cough as in croup.[2] The neck may swell in part due to enlarged lymph nodes.[1] A form of diphtheria that involves the skin, eyes, or genitals also exists.[1][2] Complications may include myocarditis, inflammation
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Tonsillitis
Tonsillitis
Tonsillitis
is inflammation of the tonsils, typically of rapid onset.[1] It is a type of pharyngitis.[7] Symptoms may include sore throat, fever, enlargement of the tonsils, trouble swallowing, and large lymph nodes around the neck.[1] Complications include peritonsillar abscess.[2] Tonsillitis
Tonsillitis
<

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Seward Peninsula
The Seward Peninsula
Seward Peninsula
is a large peninsula on the western coast of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. It projects about 320 kilometers (200 mi) into the Bering Sea
Bering Sea
between Norton Sound, the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea, and Kotzebue Sound, just below the Arctic
Arctic
Circle. The entire peninsula is about 330 kilometers (210 mi) long and 145 km (90 mi)-225 km (140 mi) wide. Like Seward, Alaska, it was named after William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State who fought for the U.S. purchase of Alaska. The Seward Peninsula
Seward Peninsula
is a remnant of the Bering land bridge, a roughly thousand mile wide swath of land connecting Siberia
Siberia
with mainland Alaska
Alaska
during the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Ice Age
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Bering Sea
Coordinates: 58°0′N 178°0′W / 58.000°N 178.000°W / 58.000; -178.000Bering SeaMap showing the location of the Bering Sea
Bering Sea
with latitude and longitude zones of the Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate systemThe Bering Sea
Bering Sea
(Russian: Бе́рингово мо́ре, tr. Béringovo móre) is a marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean.[1][2] It comprises a deep water basin, which then rises through a narrow slope into the shallower water above the continental shelves. The Bering Sea
Bering Sea
is separated from the Gulf of Alaska
Gulf of Alaska
by the Alaska Peninsula
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Steamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines[1] that typically drive (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw). As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steam ship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels. As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up
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Iditarod Trail
The Iditarod Trail, also known historically as the Seward-to-Nome Trail, refers to a thousand-plus mile (1,600 km) historic and contemporary trail system in the US state of Alaska. The trail began as a composite of trails established by Alaskan native peoples. Its route crossed several mountain ranges and valleys and passed through numerous historical settlements en route to Nome. The discovery of gold brought thousands of people over this route beginning in 1910. Roadhouses for people and dog barns sprang up every 20 or so miles. By 1918 World War I
World War I
and the lack of 'gold fever' resulted in far less travel. The trail might have been forgotten except for the 1925 diphtheria outbreak in Nome. In one of the final great feats of dog sleds, twenty drivers and teams carried the life-saving serum 674 miles (1,085 km) in 127 hours
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Seward, Alaska
Seward (Alutiiq: Qutalleq) is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. According to 2014 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 2,528. It was named after William H. Seward, United States Secretary of State
United States Secretary of State
under Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
and Andrew Johnson. In 1867, he fought for the U.S. purchase of Alaska
Alaska
which he finally negotiated to acquire from Russia. Mile 0 of the historic Iditarod Trail
Iditarod Trail
is at Seward
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Alaska Interior
Interior Alaska
Alaska
is the central region of Alaska's territory, roughly bounded by the Alaska
Alaska
Range to the south and the Brooks Range
Brooks Range
to the north. It is largely wilderness. Mountains include Denali
Denali
in the Alaska
Alaska
Range, the Wrangell Mountains, and the Ray Mountains. The native people of the interior are Alaskan Athabaskans. The largest city in the interior is Fairbanks, Alaska's second-largest city, in the Tanana Valley. Other towns include North Pole, just southeast of Fairbanks, Eagle, Tok, Glennallen, Delta Junction, Nenana, Anderson, Healy and Cantwell
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Mail
The mail or post is a system for physically transporting postcards, letters, and parcels.[1] A postal service can be private or public, though many governments place restrictions on private systems. Since the mid-19th century, national postal systems have generally been established as government monopolies with a fee on the article prepaid. Proof of payment is often in the form of adhesive postage stamps, but postage meters are also used for bulk mailing. Modern private postal systems are typically distinguished from national postal agencies by the names "courier" or "delivery service". Postal authorities often have functions other than transporting letters. In some countries, a postal, telegraph and telephone (PTT) service oversees the postal system, in addition to telephone and telegraph systems
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Bush Pilot
Bush flying
Bush flying
refers to aircraft operations carried out in the bush. Bush flying
Bush flying
involves operations in rough terrain where there are often no prepared landing strips or runways, frequently necessitating that b
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Train
A train is a form of rail transport consisting of a series of connected vehicles that generally runs along a rail track to transport cargo or passengers. Motive power is provided by a separate locomotive or individual motors in self-propelled multiple unit. Although historically steam propulsion dominated, the most common modern forms are diesel and electric locomotives, the latter supplied by overhead wires or additional rails. Other energy sources include horses, engine or water-driven rope or wire winch, gravity, pneumatics, gas turbines and batteries. Train
Train
tracks usually consist of two running rails, sometimes supplemented by additional rails such as electric conducting rails and rack rails, with a limited number of monorails and maglev guideways in the mix.[1] There are various types of trains that are designed for particular purposes
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Nenana, Alaska
Nenana /nɛˈnænə/ (Toghotili[5] in Lower Tanana language) is a Home Rule City in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census
Census
Area of the Unorganized Borough in the Interior of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska. Nenana developed as a Lower Tanana community at the confluence where the tributary Nenana River enters the Tanana. The population was 378 at the 2010 census. Completed in 1923, the 700-foot-long (210 m) Mears Memorial Bridge was built over the Tanana River
Tanana River
as part of the state's railroad project connecting Anchorage
Anchorage
and Fairbanks.Contents1 History and culture 2 Geography and climate 3 Demographics 4 Public services 5 Economy and transport 6 Popular culture 7 References 8 External linksHistory and culture[edit] Nenana is in the westernmost portion of Tanana territory
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Quarantine
A quarantine is used to separate and restrict the movement of people; it is a 'a restraint upon the activities or communication of persons or the transport of goods designed to prevent the spread of disease or pests', for a certain period of time.[1] This is often used in connection to disease and illness, such as those who may possibly have been exposed to a communicable disease.[2] The term is often erroneously used to mean medical isolation, which is "to separate ill persons who have a communicable disease from those who are healthy".[3] The word comes from an Italian variant (seventeenth-century Venetian) of 'quaranta giorni', meaning forty days, the period that all ships were required to be isolated before passengers and crew could go ashore during the Black Death
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Alaska Native
Alaska
Alaska
Natives are indigenous peoples of Alaska, United States: Iñupiat, Yupik, Aleut, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, and a number of Northern Athabaskan cultures. They are often defined by their language groups. Alaska
Alaska
Natives are enrolled in federally recognized Alaska
Alaska
Native tribal entities, who in turn belong to 13 Alaska
Alaska
Native Regional Corporations, who administer land and financial claims. Ancestors of the Alaska
Alaska
Natives are known to have migrated into the area thousands of years ago, in at least two different waves. Some are descendants of a third wave of migration in which people settled across the northern part of North America. They never migrated to southern areas
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U.S. Public Health Service
The Public Health Service Act
Public Health Service Act
of 1944 structured the United States Public Health Service (PHS), founded in 1798, as the primary division of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW; which was established in 1953), which later became the United States Department of Health and Human Services in 1979–1980 (when the Education agencies were separated into their own U.S. Department of Education). The Office of the Surgeon General was created in 1871. The PHS comprises all Agency Divisions of Health and Human Services and the Commissioned Corps
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