HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

16th Century
The 1 6th century
6th century
begins with the Julian year 1501
1501
and ends with either the Julian or the Gregorian year 1600
1600
(depending on the reckoning used; the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
introduced a lapse of 10 days in October 1582).[1] The 1 6th century
6th century
is regarded by historians as the century in which the rise of the West occurred
[...More...]

"16th Century" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hyperborea
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
the Hyperboreans (Ancient Greek: Ὑπερβόρε(ι)οι, pronounced [hyperbóre(ː)ɔi̯]; Latin: Hyperborei) were a mythical race of giants who lived "beyond the North Wind". The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind (one of the Anemoi, or "Winds") lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea
Hyperborea
indicates a region that lay far to the north of Thrace. This land was supposed to be perfect, with the sun shining twenty-four hours a day, which to modern ears suggests a possible location within the Arctic Circle
Arctic Circle
during the Midnight Sun-time of year
[...More...]

"Hyperborea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zero-sum Game
In game theory and economic theory, a zero-sum game is a mathematical representation of a situation in which each participant's gain or loss of utility is exactly balanced by the losses or gains of the utility of the other participants. If the total gains of the participants are added up and the total losses are subtracted, they will sum to zero. Thus, cutting a cake, where taking a larger piece reduces the amount of cake available for others, is a zero-sum game if all participants value each unit of cake equally (see marginal utility). In contrast, non-zero-sum describes a situation in which the interacting parties' aggregate gains and losses can be less than or more than zero. A zero-sum game is also called a strictly competitive game while non-zero-sum games can be either competitive or non-competitive
[...More...]

"Zero-sum Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Doctrine
Doctrine (from Latin: doctrina) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or belief system. The Greek analogue is the etymology of catechism.[1] Often doctrine specifically suggests a body of religious principles as it is promulgated by a church, but not necessarily; doctrine is also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common law traditions, established through a history of past decisions, such as the doctrine of self-defense, or the principle of fair use, or the more narrowly applicable first-sale doctrine
[...More...]

"Doctrine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amerigo Vespucci
Amerigo Vespucci
Amerigo Vespucci
(Italian pronunciation: [ameˈriːɡo vesˈputtʃi]; March 9, 1454 – February 22, 1512) was an Italian explorer, financier, navigator and cartographer who first demonstrated in about 1502 that Brazil
Brazil
and the West Indies
West Indies
did not represent Asia's eastern outskirts as initially conjectured from Columbus' voyages, but instead constituted an entirely separate landmass hitherto unknown to people of the Old World
[...More...]

"Amerigo Vespucci" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Map
A world map is a map of most or all of the surface of the Earth. World maps form a distinctive category of maps due to the problem of projection. Maps by necessity distort the presentation of the earth's surface. These distortions reach extremes in a world map. The many ways of projecting the earth reflect diverse technical and aesthetic goals for world maps.[3] World
World
maps are also distinct for the global knowledge required to construct them. A meaningful map of the world could not be constructed before the European Renaissance
Renaissance
because less than half of the earth's coastlines, let alone its interior regions, were known to any culture. New knowledge of the earth's surface has been accumulating ever since and continues to this day. Maps of the world generally focus either on political features or on physical features. Political maps emphasize territorial boundaries and human settlement
[...More...]

"World Map" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Richard E. Byrd
Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd Jr., USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was an American naval officer who specialized in feats of exploration. He was a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the highest honor for valor given by the United States, and was a pioneering American aviator, polar explorer, and organizer of polar logistics. Aircraft flights in which he served as a navigator and expedition leader crossed the Atlantic Ocean, a segment of the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, and a segment of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Plateau. Byrd claimed that his expeditions had been the first to reach both the North Pole
North Pole
and the South Pole
South Pole
by air
[...More...]

"Richard E. Byrd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

1580s
The 1580s decade ran from January
January
1, 1580, to December
[...More...]

"1580s" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

David (Michelangelo)
David
David
is a masterpiece of Renaissance
Renaissance
sculpture created in marble between 1501 and 1504 by Michelangelo. David
David
is a 5.17-metre (17.0 ft)[a] marble statue of a standing male nude
[...More...]

"David (Michelangelo)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Americas
Largest metropolitan areas Largest citiesList1.São Paulo 2.Lima 3. Mexico
Mexico
City 4.New York City 5.Bogotá 6.Rio de Janeiro 7.Santiago 8.Los Angeles 9.Caracas 10.Buenos AiresCIA political map of the Americas
Americas
in Lambert azimuthal equal-area projectionThe Americas
Americas
(also collectively called America)[5][6][7] comprise the totality of the continents of North and South America.[8][9][10] Together, they make up most of the land in Earth's western hemisphere[11][12][13][14][15][16] and comprise the New World. Along with their associated islands, they cover 8% of Earth's total surface area and 28.4% of its land area. The topography is dominated by the American Cordillera, a long chain of mountains that runs the length of the west coast. The flatter eastern side of the Americas
Americas
is dominated by large river basins, such as the Amazon, St
[...More...]

"Americas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asia
Metropolitan areas of Asia List of cities in AsiaList Bangkok Beijing Busan Chittagong Delhi Dhaka Doha Dubai Guangzhou Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Karachi Kuala Lumpur Manila Mumbai Osaka Pyongyang Riyadh Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Seoul Taipei[4] Tehran Tokyo Ulaanbaatar Asia
Asia
(/ˈeɪʒə, ˈeɪʃə/ ( listen)) is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe
Europe
and the continental landmass of Afro- Eurasia
Eurasia
with both Europe
Europe
and Africa
[...More...]

"Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Africa
Africa
Africa
is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (the first being Asia
Asia
in both categories). At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its total land area.[3] With 1.2 billion[1] people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea
Red Sea
along the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
to the northeast, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west. The continent includes Madagascar
Madagascar
and various archipelagos
[...More...]

"Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko ˌbwɔnarˈrɔːti siˈmoːni]; 6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564) was an I
[...More...]

"Michelangelo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gerardus Mercator
Gerardus Mercator
Gerardus Mercator
(/dʒəˈrɑːrdəs mərˈkeɪtər/;[1][2][3] 5 March 1512 – 2 December 1594)[4] was a 16th-century German-Flemish cartographer, geographer and cosmographer. He was renowned for creating the 1569 world map based on a new projection which represented sailing courses of constant bearing (rhumb lines) as straight lines—an innovation that is still employed in nautical charts. Mercator was one of the founders of the Netherlandish school of cartography and is widely considered as the most notable representative of the school in its golden age (approximately 1570s–1670s)
[...More...]

"Gerardus Mercator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

1590s
The 1590s decade ran from January
January
1, 1590, to December 31, 1599.Millennium: 2nd millenniumCenturies:15th century 16th century 17th centuryDecades:1570s 1580s 1590s 1600s 1610sYears:1590 1591 1592 1593 15941595 1596 1597 1598 1599Categories:Births Deaths By country By topicEstablishments DisestablishmentsContents1 Events1.1 15
[...More...]

"1590s" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.