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11th German-Bulgarian Army
World War IEastern Front BalkansSerbian Campaign Salonika FrontThe 11th Army
Army
(German: 11. Armee / Armeeoberkommando 11 / A.O.K. 11) was an army level command of the German Army
Army
in World War I. It was formed in March 1915 in Kassel
Kassel
originally to serve on the Western Front but was transported to Galicia for service on the Eastern Front. The army was dissolved on 8 September 1915,[1] but reformed on 23 September 1915 for the Serbian Campaign. It was finally dissolved on 7 January 1919.[2]Contents1 History 2 Commanders 3 Glossary 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory[edit] The 11th Army
Army
was formed in early 1915. It briefly fought on the Western Front during the Battle of Ypres, holding the line against the Allied attack
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German Empire
The German Empire
German Empire
(German: Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich),[5][6][7][8] also known as Imperial Germany,[9] was the German nation state[10] that existed from the Unification of Germany
Unification of Germany
in 1871 until the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II
Wilhelm II
in 1918. It was founded in 1871 when the south German states joined the North German Confederation. On January 1st, the new constitution came into force that changed the name of the federal state and introduced the title of emperor for Wilhelm I, King of Prussia
King of Prussia
from the Hohenzollern dynasty.[11] Berlin
Berlin
remained its capital. Otto von Bismarck
Otto von Bismarck
remained Chancellor, the head of government
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9th Army (German Empire)
World War IEastern FrontBattle of the Vistula River Battle of Łódź (1914) Battle of BolimówRomanian CampaignBattle of Transylvania Battle of MărăştiWestern FrontSecond Battle of the MarneThe 9th Army
Army
(German: 9. Armee / Armeeoberkommando 9 / A.O.K. 9) was an army level command of the German Army
Army
in World War I. It was formed in September 1914 in Breslau
Breslau
to command troops on the southern sector of the Eastern Front. The army was dissolved on 30 July 1916, but reformed in Transylvania
Transylvania
on 6 September 1916 for the Romanian Campaign
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Army Group Mackensen (Poland)
The Army Group Mackensen (German: Heeresgruppe Mackensen, HGr. Mackensen) which operated in Poland between 22 April 1915 and 8 September 1915 during World War I
World War I
under the command of Field Marshal August von Mackensen, was an army group of the Imperial German Army. It was renamed on 8 September 1915 to Army Group Linsingen when Alexander von Linsingen
Alexander von Linsingen
became its new commander. In June 1916, the Army Group faced the Brusilov Offensive. After an initial retreat, it checked the Russian advance at the Battle of Kowel. After the signing of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
in March 1918, the Army Group occupied the Ukraine. On 31 March 1918, von Linsingen was replaced by Hermann von Eichhorn and the Army Group was renamed Army Group Eichhorn-Kiev (German: Heeresgruppe Eichhorn-Kiew)
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Generalfeldmarschall
Generalfeldmarschall
Generalfeldmarschall
(English: general field marshal, field marshal general, or field marshal;  listen (help·info); abbreviated to Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states and the Holy Roman Empire; in the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary, the rank Feldmarschall was used
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General Of The Artillery (Germany)
General der Artillerie (en: General of the artillery) may mean: 1. A rank of three-star general, comparable to modern armed forces OF-8
OF-8
grade, in the Imperial Army, Reichswehr
Reichswehr
or Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
- the second-highest regular rank below Generaloberst. Cavalry officers of equivalent rank were called general of the cavalry, and infantry officers of equivalent rank general of the infantry. The Wehrmacht also had General der Panzertruppen (tank troops), General der Gebirgstruppen (mountain troops), General der Pioniere
General der Pioniere
(engineers), General der Fallschirmtruppen (parachute troops), General der Nachrichtentruppen (communications troops). Today in the Bundeswehr, the rank of lieutenant general corresponds to the traditional rank of general of the artillery
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12th Army (German Empire)
The 12th Army
Army
(German: 12. Armee / Armeeoberkommando 12 / A.O.K. 12) was an army level command of the German Army
Army
in World War I
World War I
formed in August 1915 by the redesignation of Armee-Gruppe Gallwitz.[1] It served exclusively on the Eastern Front and was dissolved on 9 October 1916 when its commander, General der Infanterie Max von Fabeck, was transferred to 8th Army.[2]Contents1 History 2 Commanders 3 Glossary 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory[edit]Russian withdrawal in 1915On 9 February 1915 Guards Reserve Corps
Guards Reserve Corps
was redesignated Armee-Gruppe Gallwitz. Its commander was raised to the status of an Army
Army
Commander on 18 March 1915 and his Armee-Gruppe was redesignated as 12th Army
Army
on 7 August 1915. On 22 July, the armies of Central Powers crossed the Vistula river
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Arnold Von Winckler
Arnold von Winckler
Arnold von Winckler
(Neisse, 17 February 1856 – Bad Freienwalde, 24 July 1945) was a Prussian military officer, and a general in World War I. He was the son of Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
Ewald Fedor von Winckler (1813–1895) and joined the Prussian army
Prussian army
at the age of 17. By 1912 he commanded the 2nd Guards Infantry Division in Berlin. At the outbreak of World War I, he fought with his division on the Western Front as part of the Second Army and participated in the First Battle of the Marne
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I Corps (German Empire)
Austro-Prussian WarBattle of Trautenau Battle of KöniggrätzFranco-Prussian WarBattle of Noiseville Battle of Gravelotte Siege of Metz Battle of Amiens (1870) Battle of Hallue Battle of St. Quentin (1871)World War IBattle of Stallupönen Battle of Gumbinnen Battle of Tannenberg (1914) First Battle of the Masurian LakesThe I Army Corps
Corps
/ I AK (German: I. Armee-Korps) was a corps level command of the Prussian and then the Imperial German Armies from the 19th Century to World War I. It was established with headquarters in Königsberg
Königsberg
(now Kaliningrad, Russia)
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Kuno Von Steuben
Kuno von Steuben
Kuno von Steuben
(Eisenach, 9 April 1855 – Berlin, 14 January 1935) was a Prussian military officer, and a general in the First World War. He was born in a noble family, of which Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben (1730–1794) is best known. He joined the Prussian army at the age of 13. By 1911 he commanded the 36th Division as Lieutenant General. In 1913 he was director of the Prussian Military Academy. At the outbreak of World War I, he received command of the XVIII Reserve Corps with which he fought in the Battle of the Ardennes (1914), Second Battle of Champagne
Second Battle of Champagne
(1915) and Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(1916). On 5 June 1917, he was sent to the Salonika Front
Salonika Front
to lead the 11th German Army
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XVIII Reserve Corps (German Empire)
World War IBattle of the FrontiersThe XVIII Reserve Corps (German: XVIII. Reserve-Korps / XVIII RK) was a corps level command of the German Army in World War I.Contents1 Formation1.1 Structure on formation2 Combat chronicle 3 Commanders 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyFormation[edit] XVIII Reserve Corps was formed on the outbreak of the war in August 1914[1] as part of the mobilisation of the Army. It was initially commanded by Generalleutnant Kuno von Steuben, formerly of the Prussian War Academy.[2] It was still in existence at the end of the war[3] in the 18th Army, Heeresgruppe Deutscher Kronprinz on the Western Front.[4] Structure on formation[edit] On formation in August 1914, XVIII Reserve Corps consisted of two divisions, made up of reserve units
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Army Group
An army group is a military organization consisting of several field armies, which is self-sufficient for indefinite periods. It is usually responsible for a particular geographic area. An army group is the largest field organization handled by a single commander—usually a full general or field marshal—and it generally includes between 400,000 and 1,000,000 soldiers. In the Polish Armed Forces
Polish Armed Forces
and former Soviet Red Army
Red Army
an army group was known as a Front. The equivalent of an army group in the Imperial Japanese Army was a "general army" (Sō-gun (総軍)). Army groups may be multi-national formations. For example, during World War II, the Southern Group of Armies (also known as the U.S. 6th Army Group) comprised the U.S. Seventh Army
U.S

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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Generaloberst
Generaloberst, in English Colonel General, was, in Germany and Austria-Hungary—the German Reichswehr
Reichswehr
and Wehrmacht, the Austro-Hungarian Common Army, and the East German
East German
National People's Army, as well as the respective police services—the second highest general officer rank, ranking above full general but below general field marshal. It was equivalent to Generaladmiral
Generaladmiral
in the Kriegsmarine until 1945, or to Flottenadmiral in the Volksmarine
Volksmarine
until 1990. The rank was the highest ordinary military rank and the highest military rank awarded in peacetime; the higher rank of general field marshal was only awarded in wartime by the head of state
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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