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Ōta, Gunma
Ōta (太田市, Ōta-shi) is a city located in Gunma Prefecture, Japan. As of February 2015, the city had an estimated population of 219,531, and a population density of 1260 persons per km². Its total area is 60.97 km².Contents1 Geography 2 Surrounding municipalities 3 History 4 Economy 5 Education5.1 University6 Transportation6.1 Railway 6.2 Highway7 Local attractions 8 Sister-city relations 9 Notable people 10 References 11 External linksGeography[edit] Ōta is located in the extreme southeastern portion of Gunma Prefecture in the northern Kantō Plains, bordered by Tochigi Prefecture to the east and Saitama Prefecture
Saitama Prefecture
to the south
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Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
is the production of products for use or sale using labour and machines, tools, chemical and biological processing, or formulation, and is the essence of secondary industry. The term may refer to a range of human activity, from handicraft to high tech, but is most commonly applied to industrial design, in which raw materials from primary industry are transformed into finished goods on a large scale. Such finished goods may be sold to other manufacturers for the production of other more complex products (such as aircraft, household appliances, furniture, sports equipment or automobiles), or distributed via the tertiary industry to end users and consumers (usually through wholesalers, who in turn sell to retailers, who then sell them to individual customers). Manufacturing engineering
Manufacturing engineering
or manufacturing process are the steps through which raw materials are transformed into a final product
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Watarase River
The Watarase River' (渡良瀬川, Watarase-gawa) is a major river in the northern Kantō region
Kantō region
of Japan. A tributary of the Tone River, it is 106.7 kilometres (66.3 mi) in length and drains an area of 2,621 square kilometres (1,012 sq mi).[1] Its source is at Mount Sukai
Mount Sukai
on the boundary of the city of Nikkō in Tochigi Prefecture and it empties into the Tone River
Tone River
at the boundary of the city of Koga in Ibaraki Prefecture
Ibaraki Prefecture
and the city of Kazo in Saitama Prefecture. It is classed as a First-class river by the Japanese government. Although the river currently discharges into the Tone River, its original route was via the Edo River
Edo River
into Tokyo Bay
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Population
In biology, a population is all the organisms of the same group or species, which live in a particular geographical area, and have the capability of interbreeding.[1][2] The area of a sexual population is the area where inter-breeding is potentially possible between any pair within the area, and where the probability of interbreeding is greater than the probability of cross-breeding with individuals from other areas.[3] In sociology, population refers to a collection of humans. Demography is a social science which entails the statistical study of human populations
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Population Density
Population
Population
density (in agriculture: standing stock and standing crop) is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term.[1] In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.Contents1 Biological population densities1.1 Countries and dependent territories 1.2 Other methods of measurement2 See also2.1 Lists of entities by population density3 References 4 External linksBiological population densities[edit] Population
Population
density is population divided by total land area or water volume, as appropriate.[1] Low densities may cause an extinction vortex and lead to further reduced fertility
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Kantō Plain
The Kantō Plain
Kantō Plain
(関東平野 Kantō heiya) is the largest plain in Japan
Japan
located in the Kanto Region
Kanto Region
of central Honshū. The total area 17,000 km2 covers more than half of the region extending over Tokyo, Saitama Prefecture, Kanagawa Prefecture, Chiba Prefecture, Gunma Prefecture, Tochigi Prefecture
Tochigi Prefecture
and Ibaraki Prefecture.[1] The northern limit borders on the Abukuma Highlands, Yamizo Mountain Range, Ashio Mountain Range, and a volcanic field associated with the Nasu Volcanic Belt. The western coincides with the Kantō Mountain Range and the southern edge is defined by the Bōsō Peninsula, the Miura Hills, Tokyo
Tokyo
Bay, and Sagami Bay. The Kashima Sea and Kujūkuri Beach define the eastern end of the plain
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Tochigi Prefecture
Tochigi Prefecture
Tochigi Prefecture
(栃木県, Tochigi-ken) is a prefecture located in the Kantō region
Kantō region
of Japan.[1] The capital is the city of Utsunomiya.[2] Nikkō, whose ancient Shintō shrines and Buddhist
Buddhist
temples UNESCO has recognized by naming them a World Heritage Site, is in this prefecture.[3] Other famous parts of Tochigi include a region called Nasu known for onsen and local sake and ski resorts. The Imperial Family has a villa in Nasu
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Special Cities Of Japan
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Tone River
The Tone River
Tone River
(利根川, Tone-gawa) is a river in the Kantō region of Japan. It is 322 kilometers (200 mi) in length (the second longest in Japan
Japan
after the Shinano) and has a drainage area of 16,840 square kilometers (6,500 sq mi) (the largest in Japan)
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River
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Azalea
Azaleas /əˈzeɪliə/ are flowering shrubs in the genus Rhododendron, particularly the former sections Tsutsuji
Tsutsuji
(evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring, their flowers often lasting several weeks
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Shukuba
Shukuba
Shukuba
(宿場) were post stations during the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, generally located on one of the Edo Five Routes
Edo Five Routes
or one of its sub-routes. They were also called shuku-eki (宿駅). These post stations (or "post towns") were places where travelers could rest on their journey around the nation.[1] They were created based on policies for the transportation of goods by horseback that were developed during the Nara and Heian periods.Contents1 History 2 Post station facilities 3 Preserved and rebuilt post stations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Nakasendō's Magome-jukuThese post stations were first established by Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
shortly after the end of the Battle of Sekigahara
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Nikkō Kaidō
The Nikkō Kaidō
Nikkō Kaidō
(日光街道) was one of the five routes of the Edo period and it was built to connect Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo) with the Nikkō Tōshō-gū, which is located in the present-day city of Nikkō, Tochigi
Nikkō, Tochigi
Prefecture, Japan. It was established in 1617 by Tokugawa Ieyasu, in order for him to have a smoother route to the shrine.[1] With only twenty-one stations, the Nikkō Kaidō
Nikkō Kaidō
was the shortest of the five routes, but it shares seventeen stations with the Ōshū Kaidō
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Nakasendō
The Nakasendō
Nakasendō
(中山道, Central Mountain Route), also called the Kisokaidō (木曾街道),[1] was one of the five routes of the Edo period, and one of the two that connected Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo) to Kyoto
Kyoto
in Japan. There were 69 stations (staging-posts) between Edo
Edo
and Kyoto, crossing through Musashi, Kōzuke, Shinano, Mino and Ōmi provinces.[2] In addition to Tokyo
Tokyo
and Kyoto, the Nakasendō
Nakasendō
runs through the modern-day prefectures of Saitama, Gunma, Nagano, Gifu and Shiga, with a total distance of about 534 km (332 mi).[3] Unlike the coastal Tōkaidō, the Nakasendō
Nakasendō
traveled inland,[4] hence its name, which can be translated as "中 = central; 山 = mountain; 道 = route" (as opposed to the Tōkaidō, which roughly meant "eastern sea route")
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Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
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