HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Æthelstan
Æthelstan
Æthelstan
or Athelstan (Old English: Æþelstan,[a] or Æðelstān,[b] meaning "noble stone"; c. 894 – 27 October 939) was King of the Anglo-Saxons
King of the Anglo-Saxons
from 924 to 927 and King of the English from 927 to 939.[c] He was the son of King Edward the Elder
Edward the Elder
and his first wife, Ecgwynn. Modern historians regard him as the first King of England and one of the greatest Anglo-Saxon kings. He never married and had no children. He was succeeded by his half-brother, Edmund. When Edward died in July 924, Æthelstan
Æthelstan
was accepted by the Mercians as king. His half-brother Ælfweard may have been recognised as king in Wessex, but died within three weeks of their father's death. Æthelstan
Æthelstan
still encountered resistance in Wessex
Wessex
for several months, and was not crowned until September 925
[...More...]

"Æthelstan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kingdom Of Gwynedd
 United Kingdom ∟ Wales^ In Latin, Gwynedd
Gwynedd
was often referred to in official medieval charters and acts of the 13th century as Principatus Norwallia (Principality of North Wales).The Principality or Kingdom of Gwynedd
Gwynedd
(Medieval Latin: Venedotia or Norwallia; Middle Welsh: Guynet,[4]) was one of several successor states to the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that emerged in sub-Roman Britain in the 5th century during the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain. Based in northwest Wales, the rulers of Gwynedd
Gwynedd
repeatedly rose to preeminence and were acclaimed as "King of the Britons" before losing their power in civil wars or invasions
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Gwynedd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Viking
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
[...More...]

"Viking" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
was an independent kingdom in South Wales
South Wales
in the Early Middle Ages. It often acted as a buffer state between England to the east and the powerful south Welsh kingdom of Deheubarth
Deheubarth
to the west. It was conquered and pacified by the Normans
Normans
between 1088 and 1095, though it remained Welsh in character. It was transformed into the Lordship of Brecknock and later formed the southern and larger part of the historic county of Brecknockshire. To its south was the Kingdom of Morgannwg. The main legacy of the kingdom of Brycheiniog
Brycheiniog
is etymological
[...More...]

"Brycheiniog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kingdom Of Gwent
Gwent (Old Welsh: Guent) was a medieval Welsh kingdom, lying between the Rivers Wye and Usk. It existed from the end of Roman rule in Britain in about the 5th century until the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. Along with its neighbour Glywyssing, it seems to have had a great deal of cultural continuity with the earlier Silures,[1] keeping their own courts and diocese separate from the rest of Wales
Wales
until their conquest by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Gwent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Deheubarth
Deheubarth
Deheubarth
(Welsh pronunciation: [dɛˈhəɨbarθ]; lit. "Right-hand Part", thus "the South")[4] was a regional name for the realms of south Wales, particularly as opposed to Gwynedd (Latin: Venedotia)
[...More...]

"Deheubarth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kingdom Of Strathclyde
Strathclyde (lit. " Strath
Strath
of the River Clyde"), originally Cumbric: Ystrad Clud or Alclud (and Strath-Clota in Anglo-Saxon), was one of the early medieval kingdoms of the Britons in Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
("the Old North"), the Brythonic-speaking parts of what is now southern Scotland and northern England. The kingdom developed during the post-Roman period. It is also known as Alt Clut, a Brittonic term for Dumbarton Castle, the medieval capital of the region. It may have had its origins with the Brythonic Damnonii
Damnonii
people of Ptolemy's Geography. The language of Strathclyde, and that of the Britons in surrounding areas under non-native rulership, is known as Cumbric, a dialect or language closely related to Old Welsh, and in modern terms to Welsh, Cornish and Breton
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Strathclyde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bamburgh
Bamburgh
Bamburgh
(/ˈbæmbrə/ BAM-brə) is a village and civil parish on the coast of Northumberland, England. It had a population of 454,[1] decreasing to 414 at the 2011 census.[2] The village is notable for the nearby Bamburgh
Bamburgh
Castle, a castle which was the seat of the former Kings of Northumbria, and for its association with the Victorian era
Victorian era
heroine Grace Darling, who is buried there. The extensive beach by the village was awarded the Blue Flag rural beach award in 2005. The Bamburgh
Bamburgh
Dunes, a Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest, stand behind the beach
[...More...]

"Bamburgh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bernicia
Bernicia
Bernicia
(Old English: Bernice, Bryneich, Beornice; Latin: Bernicia) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern Scotland
Scotland
and North East England. The Anglian territory of Bernicia
Bernicia
was approximately equivalent to the modern English counties of Northumberland
Northumberland
and Durham, and the Scottish counties of Berwickshire
Berwickshire
and East Lothian, stretching from the Forth to the Tees
[...More...]

"Bernicia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Humber
The Humber
Humber
/ˈhʌmbər/ is a large tidal estuary on the east coast of Northern England. It is formed at Trent Falls, Faxfleet, by the confluence of the tidal rivers Ouse and Trent
[...More...]

"Humber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Battle Of Tettenhall
The Battle of Tettenhall
Tettenhall
(sometimes called the Battle of Wednesfield or Wōdnesfeld) took place, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, near Tettenhall
Tettenhall
on 5 August 910
[...More...]

"Battle Of Tettenhall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Battle Of The Holme
Coordinates: 52°28′33″N 0°14′33″W / 52.47588°N 0.242472°W / 52.47588; -0.242472 The Battle of the Holme took place in East Anglia
East Anglia
on 13 December 902 between the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
men of Kent
Kent
and the East Anglian Danes.[1] Its location is unknown but may have been Holme in Huntingdonshire
Huntingdonshire
(now part of Cambridgeshire).[2] Following the death of Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
in 899, his son Edward the Elder became king, but his cousin Æthelwold, the son of Alfred's elder brother, King Æthelred, claimed the throne
[...More...]

"Battle Of The Holme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battle Of Edington
Coordinates: 51°15′50″N 02°08′34″W / 51.26389°N 2.14278°W / 51.26389; -2.14278Battle of EdingtonPart of the Viking invasions of EnglandMemorial to the Battle of Ethandun erected in 2000 near Bratton Castle.[1]Date May 878Location Probably Edington, WiltshireResult Decisive West Saxon victoryBelligerentsWest Saxons Danelaw
Danelaw
VikingsCommanders and leadersAlfred the Great
[...More...]

"Battle Of Edington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Great Heathen Army
The Great Viking Army or Great Danish[a] Army, known by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
as the Great Heathen Army
Great Heathen Army
(OE: mycel hæþen here), was a coalition of Norse warriors, primarily originating from Denmark
Denmark
but with elements from Sweden and Norway, who came together under a unified command to invade the four Anglo-Saxon kingdoms that constituted England in AD 865. Since the late 8th century, the Vikings had settled for mainly "hit-and-run" raids on centres of wealth, such as monasteries. However, the intent of the Great Army was different. It was much larger and its purpose was to conquer. The name Great Heathen Army
Great Heathen Army
is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 865
[...More...]

"Great Heathen Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Benedictine
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
[...More...]

"Benedictine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cuthbert Of Lindisfarne
The Holy Island of Lindisfarne, also known simply as Holy Island,[2] is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England, which constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumberland.[3] Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD; it was an important centre of Celtic Christianity
Celtic Christianity
under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne
Eadfrith of Lindisfarne
and Eadberht of Lindisfarne. After the Viking
Viking
invasions and the Norman conquest of England, a priory was reestablished
[...More...]

"Cuthbert Of Lindisfarne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.