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Circa 1900, Cycles And Voiturettes
A voiturette is a miniature automobile.Contents1 History 2 Renault's 1898 Voiturette 3 Other automobiles so described 4 See also 5 External linksHistory[edit] Voiturette
Voiturette
was first registered by Léon Bollée
Léon Bollée
in 1895 to name his new motor tricycle. The term became so popular in the early years of the motor industry that it was used by many makers to describe their small cars
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Léon Bollée
Léon Bollée
Léon Bollée
(1 April 1870 – 16 December 1913) was a French automobile manufacturer and inventor.Contents1 Life 2 Calculating machines 3 Steam locomotive 4 Automobiles4.1 Car manufacturing5 Family 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit]Léon Bollée's MultiplierLéon Bollées Tricar, Schlumpf Collection, Mulhouse, FranceCar of 1904, 7 SeatsBollée's family were well known bellfounders and his father, Amédée Bollée (1844–1917), was the major pioneer in the automobile industry who produced several steam cars. Both Léon Bollée
Léon Bollée
and his older brother Amédée-Ernest-Marie (1867–1926) became automobile manufacturers. Calculating machines[edit] In 1887 Bollée began work on three calculating machines: the Direct Multiplier, the Calculating Board and the Arithmographe
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Luxury Vehicle
Luxury vehicle
Luxury vehicle
is a marketing term for a vehicle that provides luxury—pleasant or desirable features beyond strict necessity—at increased expense. The term suggests a vehicle with higher quality equipment, better performance, more precise construction, comfort, higher design, technologically innovative modern, or features that convey an image, brand, status, or prestige, or any other 'discretionary' feature or combination of them. The term is also broad, highly variable and relative. It is a perceptual, conditional and subjective attribute that may be comprehended differently by different people; "What is a luxury car to some..
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Supermini
Supermini
Supermini
(also called B-segment
B-segment
across Europe)[2] is a class of car larger than a city car but smaller than a small family car.[3] Superminis are usually available in hatchback body styles
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Family Car
A family car is a car classification used in Europe
Europe
to describe normally-sized cars. The name comes from the suitability of these cars to carry a whole family locally or on vacations. Most family cars are hatchbacks or sedans, although there are MPVs, estates and cabriolets with the same structure as with the other body style. The term covers two types of family cars. Small family cars[edit] Main article: Compact carA Toyota Corolla, classified as a small family car.Small family cars are between 4.30 m (169 in) and 4.45 m (175 in) long if they are hatchbacks, or between 4.40 m (173 in) and 4.70 m (185 in) if they are saloon or estate models
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Compact Car
A compact car (North America), or small family car in British acceptation, is a classification of cars that are larger than a subcompact car but smaller than a mid-size car, roughly equivalent to the C-segment
C-segment
in Europe.[1]Luxgen S5 TurboContents1 Definitions 2 American market2.1 History of compact cars in the United States3 European market3.1 Upmarket options 3.2 Alternative body styles4 Japanese market 5 UK market5.1 1970s 5.2 1980s 5.3 1990s6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinitions[edit] Current compact car size, as defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for the US and for international models respectively, is approximately 4,100 mm (161 in) and 4,450 mm (175 in) long for hatchbacks, or 4,400 mm (173 in) and 4,750 mm (187 in) long for convertibles, sedans (saloon) or station wagons (estate car)[citation needed]
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Mid-size Car
A mid-size car (occasionally referred to as an intermediate) is the North American/Australian standard for an automobile with a size equal to or greater than that of a compact. In Europe
Europe
mid-sizers are referred to as D-segment
D-segment
or large family cars.Contents1 United States 2 Japan 3 Taiwan 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUnited States[edit]The "compact" Rambler that later became an "intermediate" car, while retaining its basic dimensionsThe automobile that defined this size in the United States
United States
was the Rambler Six
Rambler Six
that was introduced in 1956, although it was called "compact" car at that time.[1] The mid-size class then grew out of the compacts of the early-1960s
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Full-size Car
"Full-size car" is a marketing term used in North America
North America
for an automobile larger than a mid-size car. Traditional U.S. full-size passenger cars were designed to be comfortable for six occupants and their luggage for long-distance driving
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Custom Car
A custom car is a passenger vehicle that has been substantially altered to improve its performance, often by altering or replacing the engine and transmission; made into a personal "styling" statement, using paintjobs and aftermarket accessories to make the car look unlike any car as delivered from the factory; or some combination of performance modifying and appearance changes. Although the two are related, custom cars are distinct from hot rods. The extent of this difference has been the subject of debate among customizers and rodders for decades. Additionally, a street rod can be considered a custom.Contents1 History 2 Customization style 3 Features3.1 Paint 3.2 Engine
Engine
swaps4 Customizers 5 Awards 6 Notable customs 7 Language7.1 Types 7.2 Common terms8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] A development of hot rodding, the change in name corresponded to the change in the design of the cars being modified
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Hot Rod
Hot rods are typically old, classic American cars with large engines modified for linear speed. The origin of the term "hot rod" is unclear. For example, some claim that the term "hot" refers to the vehicle being stolen. Other origin stories include replacing the engine's camshaft or "rod" with a higher performance version. The term has broadened to apply to other items that are modified for a particular purpose, such as "hot-rodded amplifier".Contents1 Background 2 History2.1 Late 1930s–1950s 2.2 Post World War II
World War II
origins of organized rodding 2.3 1960s rise of the street rod 2.4 Modern rodding3 In modern culture3.1 Lifestyle 3.2 In the media 3.3 In Sweden
Sweden
and Finland4 Language4.1 Common terms5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBackground[edit] Some automotive historians say that the term originated with stolen vehicles being refitted with another engine and repainted
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Lead Sled
In automotive usage, a lead sled is a standard production automobile with a body heavily modified in particular ways (see below); especially, though not exclusively, a 1949, 1950 or 1951 model year Ford 'Shoebox' or Mercury Eight
Mercury Eight
car. Period auto body repair, by an auto body mechanic used to be achieved through a combination of re-shaping sheet metal using specialist hand tools and the application of molten lead to damaged body panels, fulfilling the role of more modern polyester fillers / bondo. The same techniques were also used in high end low volume car production (
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Lowrider
A lowrider (sometimes low rider) is a class or style of customized vehicle. Distinct from a regular lowered vehicle, these customized vehicles are generally individually painted with intricate, colorful designs, rolling on wire-spoke wheels with whitewall tires. Lowrider rims range from 13"-20". They are also fitted with hydraulic or air bag systems that allow the vehicle to be raised or lowered at the owner's command. Given these specific characteristics, while a lowrider is always a lowered car, a lowered car is not always a lowrider
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T-bucket
A T-bucket
T-bucket
(or Bucket T) is a hot rod, based on a Ford Model T[1] of the 1915 to 1927 era, but extensively modified. T-buckets were favorites for greasers.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Replicas 3 Show cars 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Model Ts were hot-rodded and customized from the 1920s on, but the T-bucket
T-bucket
was specifically created and named by Norm Grabowski in the 1950s.[citation needed] This car was named Lightning Bug,[citation needed] better known as the Kookie Kar, after being redesigned by Grabowski and appearing in the TV show 77 Sunset Strip, driven by character Gerald "Kookie" Kookson. The exposure it gained led to numerous copies being built. A genuine T-bucket
T-bucket
has the two-seater body of a Model T roadster (with or without the turtle deck or small pickup box), this "bucket"-shaped body shell giving the cars their name
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Compact Executive Car
A compact executive car is a premium car smaller than an executive car. In European classification, compact executive cars are part of the D-segment
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Kei Car
Kei car, K-car, or kei jidōsha (軽自動車, lit. "light automobile") (pronounced [keːdʑidoːɕa]), is a Japanese category of small vehicles, including passenger cars (kei cars or kei-class cars), microvans, and pickup trucks (kei trucks or kei-class trucks). They are designed to comply with Japanese government tax and insurance regulations, and in most rural areas are exempted from the requirement to certify that adequate parking is available for the vehicle.[2][3][4] This especially advantaged class of cars was developed to popularize motorization in the postwar era
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Executive Car
Executive car
Executive car
is a British term for an automobile larger than a large family car. In official use, the term is adopted by Euro NCAP, a European organization founded to test for car safety. It is a passenger car classification defined by European Commission.[1]Contents1 Background 2 History in Europe2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Italy 2.4 Sweden 2.5 United Kingdom3 Overview3.1 Body styles 3.2 Market situation4 Other corresponding classes 5 Cars bigger than executive in Europe 6 Compact executive cars 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] The term was coined in the 1960s to describe cars targeted at successful professionals and middle-to-senior managers. It was often a company car, but retained enough performance and comfort to be desirable to private motorists. The executive car was seen as aspirational and a business tool enabling its users to exploit Britain and Europe's tax schemes as a company owned vehicle
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