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Gospel music is a genre of
Christian music Christian music is music Music is the art of arranging sounds in time to produce a composition through the elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the universal cultural Culture () is an umbrella term which en ...
. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to culture and social context. Gospel music is composed and performed for many purposes, including aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, and as an entertainment product for the marketplace. Gospel music often has dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) with Christian lyrics. Gospel music can be traced to the early 17th century.
Hymn A hymn is a type of song A song is a musical composition intended to be performed by the human voice. This is often done at melody, distinct and fixed pitches (melodies) using patterns of sound and silence. Songs contain various song form, ...

Hymn
s and sacred songs were often repeated in a
call and response Call and response is a form of interaction between a speaker and an audience in which the speaker's statements ("calls") are punctuated by responses from the listeners. This form is also used in music, where it falls under the general category of A ...
fashion. Most of the churches relied on hand clapping and foot stomping as rhythmic accompaniment. Most of the singing was done
a cappella A cappella (, also , ; ) music is group or solo performance without Musical instrument, instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. The term ''a cappella'' was originally intended to differentiate between Renaiss ...
.Jackson, Joyce Marie. "The changing nature of gospel music: A southern case study." ''African American Review'' 29.2 (1995): 185. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. October 5, 2010. The first published use of the term "gospel song" probably appeared in 1874. The original gospel songs were written and composed by authors such as George F. Root,
Philip Bliss Philip Paul Bliss (9 July 1838 – 29 December 1876) was an American composer, conductor, writer of hymns and a bass-baritone Gospel singer. He wrote many well-known hymns, including "Hold the Fort" (1870), "Almost Persuaded" (1871); "Hallelujah, ...

Philip Bliss
, Charles H. Gabriel,
William Howard Doane William Howard Doane (February 3, 1832 – February 23, 1915) was a manufacturer, inventor, hymn writer, choral director, church leader and philanthropist. He composed over 2000 church hymns. More than seventy patents are credited to him for inno ...
, and
Fanny Crosby Frances Jane van Alstyne (née Crosby; March 24, 1820 – February 12, 1915), more commonly known as Fanny Crosby, was an American mission worker, poet, lyricist, and composer. She was a prolific hymnist, writing more than 8,000 hymns and ...

Fanny Crosby
. Gospel music publishing houses emerged. The advent of radio in the 1920s greatly increased the audience for gospel music. Following
World War II World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It involved —including all of the great powers—forming two opposing s: the and the . In a total war directly involving m ...
, gospel music moved into major auditoriums, and gospel music concerts became quite elaborate. Black gospel, by far the best-known variant, emerged out of the
African-American music African-American music is an umbrella term covering a diverse range of music and musical genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions. It is to b ...
tradition and has evolved in various ways over the years, continuing to form the basis of
Black church The term Black Church refers to the body of Christianity, Christian Church (congregation), congregations and Christian denomination, denominations in the United States that minister predominantly to African Americans, African-Americans, as well as ...
worship even today. It has also come to be used in churches of various other cultural traditions (especially within
Pentecostalism Pentecostalism or classical Pentecostalism is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on the Life of Jesus in the New Testament, life ...
) and, via the gospel choir phenomenon spearheaded by Thomas Dorsey, has become a form of musical devotion worldwide.
Southern gospel#REDIRECT Southern gospel {{redirect category shell, {{R from other capitalisation{{R from move ...
used all male, tenor-lead-baritone-bass quartet make-up. Progressive Southern gospel is an American music genre that has grown out of Southern gospel over the past couple of decades.
Christian country music Christian country music (sometimes marketed as country gospel, gospel country, positive country or inspirational country) is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christianity, Christian life, as well as ( ...
, sometimes referred to as country gospel music, is a subgenre of gospel music with a country flair. It peaked in popularity in the mid-1990s. Bluegrass gospel music is rooted in American mountain music.
Celtic The words Celt and Celtic (also Keltic) may refer to: Ethno-linguistics *Celts The Celts (, see pronunciation of ''Celt'' for different usages) are. "CELTS location: Greater Europe time period: Second millennium B.C.E. to present ancestry: ...
gospel music infuses gospel music with a
Celtic The words Celt and Celtic (also Keltic) may refer to: Ethno-linguistics *Celts The Celts (, see pronunciation of ''Celt'' for different usages) are. "CELTS location: Greater Europe time period: Second millennium B.C.E. to present ancestry: ...
flair, and is quite popular in countries such as Ireland. British black gospel refers to Gospel music of the
African diaspora The African diaspora is the worldwide collection of communities descended from native Africans or people from Africa, predominantly in the Americas. The term is most commonly refers to the descendants of the West and Central Africans who were ...

African diaspora
produced in the UK.


History

According to Yale University music professor Willie Ruff, the singing of psalms in
Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic ( gd, Gàidhlig ), also known as Scots Gaelic and Gaelic, is a Goidelic language The Goidelic or Gaelic languages ( ga, teangacha Gaelacha; gd, cànanan Goidhealach; gv, çhengaghyn Gaelgagh) form one of the two groups of ...
by
Presbyterians Presbyterianism is a part of the Reformed tradition within Protestantism Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Criticism of the Cath ...
of the Scottish
Hebrides The Hebrides (; gd, Innse Gall, ; non, Suðreyjar) are an archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland Scotland ( sco, Scotland, gd, Alba ) is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. Coveri ...
evolved from "
lining out Lining out or hymn lining, called precenting the line in Scotland, is a form of a cappella hymn-singing or hymnody in which a leader, often called the clerk or precentor, gives each line of a hymn tune as it is to be sung, usually in a chanted for ...
"—where one person sang a solo and others followed—into the
call and response Call and response is a form of interaction between a speaker and an audience in which the speaker's statements ("calls") are punctuated by responses from the listeners. This form is also used in music, where it falls under the general category of A ...
of gospel music of the American South. Another theory notes foundations in the works of Dr.
Isaac Watts Isaac Watts (17 July 1674 – 25 November 1748) was an English Christian minister (Congregational), hymn A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a d ...

Isaac Watts
and others. Moreover, the genre arose during a time when literacy was not a guarantee, utilizing a great deal of repetition (which, unlike more traditional hymns, allowed those who could not read the opportunity to participate).


18th century

Perhaps the most famous gospel-based hymns were composed in the 1760s and 1770s by English writers
John Newton John Newton (; – 21 December 1807) was an English Anglican cleric, a captain of slave ships who later became an abolitionist, and an investor of trade. He served as a sailor in the Royal Navy The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom' ...

John Newton
("
Amazing Grace "Amazing Grace" is a Christian hymn A hymn is a type of song, usually religious and partially coincident with devotional song, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to ...
") and
Augustus Toplady Augustus Montague Toplady Augustus Montague Toplady (4 November 174011 August 1778) was an Anglican Anglicanism is a Western Christianity, Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Chur ...

Augustus Toplady
("Rock of Ages"), members of the
Anglican Church Anglicanism is a Western Christianity, Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation. Adherents of Anglicanism are called ''Anglicans''; th ...
. Starting out as lyrics only, it took decades for standardized tunes to be added to them. Although not directly connected with African-American gospel music, they were adopted by African-Americans as well as white Americans, and Newton's connection with the abolition movement provided cross-fertilization.


Holiness-Pentecostal era (19th century)

The first published use of the term "Gospel song" probably appeared in 1874 when
Philip Bliss Philip Paul Bliss (9 July 1838 – 29 December 1876) was an American composer, conductor, writer of hymns and a bass-baritone Gospel singer. He wrote many well-known hymns, including "Hold the Fort" (1870), "Almost Persuaded" (1871); "Hallelujah, ...

Philip Bliss
released a songbook entitled ''Gospel Songs. A Choice Collection of Hymns and Tunes''. It was used to describe a new style of church music, songs that were easy to grasp and more easily singable than the traditional church
hymns A hymn is a type of song A song is a musical composition intended to be performed by the human voice. This is often done at melody, distinct and fixed pitches (melodies) using patterns of sound and silence. Songs contain various song form, ...
, which came out of the mass revival movement starting with Dwight L. Moody, whose musician was Ira D. Sankey, as well as the
Holiness Sacred describes something that is dedicated or set apart for the service or worship of a deity A deity or god is a supernatural being considered divinity, divine or sacred. The ''Oxford Dictionary of English'' defines deity as "a God (male d ...
-
Pentecostal Pentecostalism or classical Pentecostalism is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on the Life of Jesus in the New Testament, life ...
movement. Prior to the meeting of Moody and Sankey in 1870, there was an American rural/frontier history of revival and
camp meeting The camp meeting is a form of Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Criticism of the Catholic Church, errors in the Catholic Ch ...

camp meeting
songs, but the gospel hymn was of a different character, and it served the needs of mass revivals in the great cities. The revival movement employed popular singers and song leaders, the most famous of them being Ira D. Sankey. The original "gospel" songs were written and composed by authors such as George F. Root,
Philip Bliss Philip Paul Bliss (9 July 1838 – 29 December 1876) was an American composer, conductor, writer of hymns and a bass-baritone Gospel singer. He wrote many well-known hymns, including "Hold the Fort" (1870), "Almost Persuaded" (1871); "Hallelujah, ...

Philip Bliss
, Charles H. Gabriel,
William Howard Doane William Howard Doane (February 3, 1832 – February 23, 1915) was a manufacturer, inventor, hymn writer, choral director, church leader and philanthropist. He composed over 2000 church hymns. More than seventy patents are credited to him for inno ...
, and
Fanny Crosby Frances Jane van Alstyne (née Crosby; March 24, 1820 – February 12, 1915), more commonly known as Fanny Crosby, was an American mission worker, poet, lyricist, and composer. She was a prolific hymnist, writing more than 8,000 hymns and ...

Fanny Crosby
. As an extension to his initial publication ''Gospel Songs'', Philip Bliss, in collaboration with Ira D. Sankey issued no's. 1 to 6 of ''Gospel Hymns'' in 1875. Sankey and Bliss's collection can be found in many libraries today. The popularity of revival singers and the openness of rural churches to this type of music (in spite of its initial use in city revivals) led to the late 19th and early 20th century establishment of gospel music publishing houses such as those of
Homer Rodeheaver Homer Rodeheaver, circa 1912 Homer Alvan Rodeheaver (October 4, 1880 – December 18, 1955) was an American evangelist, music director, music publisher, composer of gospel songs, and pioneer in the recording of sacred music. Early career Born in ...
, E. O. Excell, Charlie Tillman, and Charles Tindley. These publishers were in the market for large quantities of new music, providing an outlet for the creative work of many songwriters and composers. The advent of radio in the 1920s greatly increased the audience for gospel music, and James D. Vaughan used radio as an integral part of his business model, which also included traveling quartets to publicize the gospel music books he published several times a year. Virgil O. Stamps and Jesse R. Baxter studied Vaughan's business model and by the late 1920s were running heavy competition for Vaughan. The 1920s also saw the marketing of gospel records by groups such as the
Carter Family The Carter Family is a traditional American folk music group that recorded between 1927 and 1956. Their music had a profound impact on bluegrass, country A country is a distinct territory, territorial body or political entity. It is oft ...
.


Emergence of Black gospel (1920s–1970s)

The Pentecostal movement quickly made inroads with churches not attuned to the Europeanized Black church music that had become popular over the years since Emancipation. These congregations readily adopted and contributed to the gospel music publications of the early 20th century.
Sister Rosetta Tharpe Sister Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 – October 9, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter Songwriting partners Rodgers and Hart working on a song in 1936 A songwriter is a musician A musician is a person who composes, conducts, or per ...
, pioneer of
rock and roll Rock and roll (often written as rock & roll, rock 'n' roll, or rock 'n roll) is a genre of popular music Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and sty ...
, soon emerged from this tradition as the first great gospel recording artist. The first person to introduce ragtime to gospel (and the first to play piano on a gospel recording) was Arizona Dranes. The 1930s saw the rise of Black gospel quartets such as the
Five Blind Boys of Mississippi The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi was an American post-war gospel quartet. With lead singer Archie Brownlee, their single "Our Father" reached number ten on the Billboard R&B charts in early 1951. It was one of the first gospel records to do ...
and the Five Blind Boys of Alabama. In addition to these high-profile quartets, there were many Black gospel musicians performing in the 1920s and 30s, usually playing the guitar and singing in the streets of Southern cities. In the 1930s, in Chicago,
Thomas A. Dorsey Thomas Andrew Dorsey (July 1, 1899 – January 23, 1993) was an American musician, composer, and Evangelism, Christian evangelist influential in the development of early blues and 20th-century gospel music. He penned 3,000 songs, a third of them ...
turned to gospel music, establishing a publishing house. It has been said that 1930 was the year traditional black gospel music began, as the National Baptist Convention first publicly endorsed the music at its 1930 meeting. Dorsey was responsible for developing the musical careers of many African-American artists, such as Mahalia Jackson (best-known for her rendition of his " Precious Lord, Take My Hand"). Meanwhile, radio continued to develop an audience for gospel music, a fact that was commemorated in Albert E. Brumley's 1937 song, "Turn Your Radio On" (which is still being published in gospel song books). (In 1972, a recording of " Turn Your Radio On" by the Lewis Family was nominated for Gospel Song of the Year.) In 1964, the
Gospel Music Association The Gospel Music Association (GMA) is a nonprofit organization founded in 1964 for the purpose of supporting and promoting the development of all forms of Gospel music. As of 2011, there are about 4,000 members worldwide. The GMA's membership co ...
was established, which in turn began the
Dove Awards A Dove Award is an accolade by the Gospel Music Association (GMA) of the United States to recognize outstanding achievement in the Christian music industry. The awards are presented annually. Formerly held in Nashville, Tennessee Nashville is ...
(in 1969) and the
Gospel Music Hall of Fame The Gospel Music Hall of Fame, created in 1972 by the Gospel Music Association, is a Hall of Fame A hall, wall, or walk of fame is a list of individuals, achievements, or animals, usually chosen by a group of electors, to mark their fame in ...
(in 1972). Both of the latter two groups began primarily for Southern gospel performers, but in the late 1970s, began including artists of other subgenres, which brought in many Black artists. Also in 1969,
James Cleveland James Edward Cleveland (December 5, 1931 – February 9, 1991) was an American gospel Gospel originally meant the Christian message, but in the 2nd century it came to be used also for the books in which the message was set out; in this sense a ...
established the
Gospel Music Workshop of America Gospel Music Workshop of America is an international music convention founded by James Cleveland, Rev. James Cleveland. GMWA membership Active GMWA Membership ranges from professional and amateur Gospel vocalists to instrumentalists, composers, ar ...
, a Black gospel outlet. Late 20th-century musicians such as
Elvis Presley Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977) was an American singer and actor. Dubbed the "Honorific nicknames in popular music, King of Rock and Roll", he is regarded as Cultural impact of Elvis Presley, one of the most si ...

Elvis Presley
,
Jerry Lee Lewis Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. Nicknamed the Killer, he has been described as "rock n' roll Rock and roll (often written as rock & roll, rock 'n' roll, or rock 'n roll) is a genre of ...
, and the were also known for their gospel influences and recordings.


Contemporary Black gospel and gospel rap (1970s–present)

Urban contemporary gospel Urban/contemporary gospel is a modern subgenre of gospel music. Although the style developed gradually, early forms are generally dated to the 1970s, and the genre was well established by the end of the 1980s. The radio format is pitched prim ...
emerged in the late 70s, with artists such as the Clark Sisters and Andrae Crouch crossing over musically and gaining notoriety, and this pattern would repeat itself in subsequent decades, with new artists like
Yolanda Adams Yolanda Yvette Adams (born August 27, 1961) is an American gospel Gospel originally meant the Christian message ("the gospel In Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on th ...

Yolanda Adams
and
Kirk Franklin Kirk Dewayne Franklin (born January 26, 1970) is an American choir director, gospel music Gospel music is a genre of Christian music. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to cult ...
making increasingly more bold forays into the secular world with their musical stylings. The current sphere of Black gospel recording artists is almost exclusively of the urban contemporary bent. Also of note is the rise of Christian (or gospel) rap/hip-hop, which has gained increasing popularity since the days of the
Gospel Gangstaz Gospel Gangstaz is a Greater Los Angeles Area-based West Coast hip hop, West Coast Christian hip hop group. The group has featured members formerly affiliated with the Crips and Bloods gangs, Mr. Solo, Chilly Baby, DJ Dove and Tik Tokk. Biography ...
and
The Cross Movement The Cross Movement was a Christian hip hop group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Ministry The Cross Movement has three separate and distinct eponymous components which comprise its ministry: # CM: The first component is the Christian hip hop gro ...
. Often considered a subgenre of urban contemporary gospel, Christian rap has become dominated in present times by artists from
Reach Records Reach Records is an American independent record label A record label, or record company, is a brand A brand is a name, term, design, symbol or any other feature that identifies one seller's good or service as distinct from those of other ...
, who have seen perhaps the most commercial success of any artists in the gospel genre;
Lecrae Lecrae Devaughn Moore (born October 9, 1979), Mononymous person, mononymously known as Lecrae, is an American Christian hip hop, Christian rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer, record and film producer, record executive, actor, and entrepr ...
(the label's founder and preeminent artist) has charted in the top 10 of on the
Billboard 200 The ''Billboard'' 200 is a record chart A record chart, also called a music chart, is a ranking of Sound recording and reproduction, recorded music according to certain criteria during a given period. Many different criteria are used in wo ...
three times, with his 2014 album "Anomaly" debuting at #1.


Subgenres


Black gospel


Traditional

Traditional Black gospel Traditional black gospel is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding African American Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular mus ...
music is the most well-known form, often seen in Black churches, non-Black Pentecostal and
evangelical Evangelicalism (), evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism, is a worldwide trans-denominational movement within Protestant Christianity that maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salv ...
churches, and in entertainment spaces across the country and world. It originates from the
Southeastern United States The southeastern United States, also referred to as the American Southeast or simply the Southeast, is broadly the eastern portion of the southern United States The Southern United States, also referred to as the Southern States, the Ame ...
("the South"), where most Black Americans lived prior to the Great Migration. This music was highly influenced by the hymnody of the spirituals and of Watts and, later, the musical style and vision of Dorsey. Whereas northern Black churches did not at first welcome Dorsey's music (having become accustomed to their own more Eurocentric flavorings), after the Southern migrants' new churches became more popular, so did gospel music, gospel choirs, and the general trend toward exclusive use of this music in Black churches. Dorsey, Mahalia Jackson, the
Mississippi Mass Choir The Mississippi Mass Choir is an American gospel Gospel originally meant the Christian message, but in the 2nd century it came to be used also for the books in which the message was set out; in this sense a gospel can be defined as a loose-knit ...
, and the
Georgia Mass Choir The Georgia Mass Choir is an American Gospel music Gospel music is a genre of Christian music. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to culture and social context. Gospel music is com ...
are but a few notable examples.


Urban contemporary

Developing out of the fusion of traditional Black gospel with the styles of secular Black music popular in the 70s and 80s,
Urban Contemporary gospel Urban/contemporary gospel is a modern subgenre of gospel music. Although the style developed gradually, early forms are generally dated to the 1970s, and the genre was well established by the end of the 1980s. The radio format is pitched prim ...
is the most common form of recorded gospel music today. It relies heavily on rhythms and instrumentation common in the secular music of the contemporary era (often including the use of electronic beats), while still incorporating the themes and heritage of the traditional Black gospel genre.
Kirk Franklin Kirk Dewayne Franklin (born January 26, 1970) is an American choir director, gospel music Gospel music is a genre of Christian music. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to cult ...
is the foremost (and by far the best-selling) individual in this genre, while Andrae Crouch, the
Clark Sisters The Clark Sisters are an American gospel music, gospel vocal group consisting of five sisters: Jacky Clark Chisholm (born 1948), Denise "Niecy" Clark-Bradford (born 1953), Twinkie Clark, Elbernita "Twinkie" Clark (born 1954), Dorinda Clark-Cole ( ...
, and Yolanda Adams are also very popular and noteworthy.


British

British black gospel refers to gospel music of the
African diaspora The African diaspora is the worldwide collection of communities descended from native Africans or people from Africa, predominantly in the Americas. The term is most commonly refers to the descendants of the West and Central Africans who were ...

African diaspora
in the UK. It is also often referred to as "UK gospel". The distinctive sound is heavily influenced by UK street culture with many artists from the African and Caribbean majority black churches in the UK. The genre has gained recognition in various awards such as the GEM (Gospel Entertainment Music) Awards,
MOBO Awards The MOBO Awards (Music of Black Origin, also known as the MOBOs) are an annual music award presentation honouring achievements in "black music, music of black origin", including Hip hop music, hip hop, Grime (music genre), grime, R&B, soul musi ...
,
Urban Music Awards The Urban Music Awards (UMA) is a hip-hop, R&B, dance Dance is a performing art art form, form consisting of sequences of movement, either improvised or purposefully selected. This movement has aesthetic and often symbolism (arts), sym ...
and has its own
Official Christian & Gospel Albums Chart The Official Christian & Gospel Albums Chart is a music chart based on sales of albums of Contemporary Christian music, Contemporary Christian and gospel music, gospel music in the UK. It is compiled weekly by the Official Charts Company (OCC), with ...
.


Southern gospel music

Southern gospel#REDIRECT Southern gospel {{redirect category shell, {{R from other capitalisation{{R from move ...
music comes from the Southeastern United States and is similar in sound to Christian country music, but it sometimes known as "quartet music" for its traditional "four men and a piano" set up. The genre, while remaining predominantly White, began to integrate Black gospel stylings in the 1960s. It has evolved over the years into a popular form of music across the United States and overseas, especially among baby boomers and those living in the South. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of southern gospel varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace.


Christian country music

Christian country music Christian country music (sometimes marketed as country gospel, gospel country, positive country or inspirational country) is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christianity, Christian life, as well as ( ...
, sometimes referred to as country gospel music, is a subgenre of gospel music with a country flair, is also known as inspirational country. Christian country over the years has progressed into a mainstream country sound with inspirational or positive country lyrics. In the mid-1990s, Christian country hit its highest popularity. So much so that mainstream artists like
Larry Gatlin Larry Wayne Gatlin (born May 2, 1948) is an American country A country is a distinct territory, territorial body or political entity. It is often referred to as the land of an individual's birth, residence or citizenship. A country may be ...
,
Charlie Daniels Charles Edward Daniels (October 28, 1936 – July 6, 2020) was an American singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist known for his contributions to Southern rock, country, and bluegrass music. He was best known for his number-one cou ...
and
Barbara Mandrell Barbara Ann Mandrell (born December 25, 1948) is an American country music Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. The term also includes Western music (North ...
, just to name a few, began recording music that had this positive Christian country flair. These mainstream artists have now become award winners in this genre.


Comparison to other hymnody

Some proponents of "standard" hymns generally dislike gospel music of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For example, Patrick and Sydnor complain that commercial success led to a proliferation of such music, and "deterioration, even in a standard which to begin with was not high, resulted." They went on to say, "there is no doubt that a deterioration in taste follows the use of this type of hymn and tune; it fosters an attachment to the trivial and sensational which dulls and often destroys sense of the dignity and beauty which best befit the song that is used in the service of God." Gold reviewed the issue in 1958, and collected a number of quotations similar to the complaints of Patrick and Sydnor. However, he also provided this quotation: "Gospel hymnody has the distinction of being America's most typical contribution to Christian song. As such, it is valid in its inspiration and in its employment."Gold, Charles E. "The Gospel Song: Contemporary Opinion," '' The Hymn''. v. 9, no. 3 (July 1958), p. 70. Today, with historical distance, there is a greater acceptance of such gospel songs into official denominational hymnals. For example, the
United Methodist Church The United Methodist Church (UMC) is a worldwide mainline Protestant The mainline Protestant churches (also called mainstream Protestant and sometimes oldline Protestant) are a group of Protestantism in the United States, Protestant denominations ...

United Methodist Church
made this acceptance explicit in ''The Faith We Sing'', a 2000 supplement to the official denominational hymnal. In the preface, the editors say, "Experience has shown that some older treasures were missed when the current hymnals were compiled."Hickman, Hoyt L., ed. "Introduction," ''The Faith We Sing'' (Nashville, Tennessee: Abingdon Press, 2000).


See also

*
Gospel Music Hall of Fame The Gospel Music Hall of Fame, created in 1972 by the Gospel Music Association, is a Hall of Fame A hall, wall, or walk of fame is a list of individuals, achievements, or animals, usually chosen by a group of electors, to mark their fame in ...
*
List of gospel musicians This incomplete list is specifically for Christian music performers in the gospel music genres who have either been very important to the genre, or have had a considerable amount of exposure, such as in the case of one that has been on a major la ...
* Phillip Paul Bliss House *
Soul music Soul music (often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arranging sounds in time to produce a composition through the ...

Soul music
*
Stellar Awards A Stellar Award is an award presented by SAGMA to recognize achievements in the Gospel music, gospel music industry.Sagma


References


Bibliography

* * * *


Further reading

* Allen, Ray. ''Singing in the Spirit: African-American Sacred Quartets in New York City'', in series, ''Publication of the American Folklore Society: New Series''. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991. xx, 268 p., ill. with b&w photos. pbk. * Barlow, Sanna Morrison. ''Mountain Singing: the Story of Gospel Recordings in the Philippines''. Hong Kong: Alliance Press, 1952. 352 p. * Blackwell, Lois. ''The Wings of a Dove: The Story of Gospel Music in America.'' Norfolk: Donning, 1978. * Boyer, Horace Clarence. ''How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel''. Elliott and Clark, 1995. . * Broughton, Viv. ''Too Close to Heaven: The Illustrated History of Gospel Music''. Midnight Books, 1996. . * Albert E Brumley & Sons. ''The Best of Albert E. Brumley''. Gospel Songs, 1966, ISBN na, paperback Amazing Grace * Cleall, Charles. ''Sixty Songs From Sankey''. London: Marshall, Morgan and Scott, 1960. * * Cusic, Don. ''The Sound of Light: a History of Gospel Music''. Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1990. iv, 267 p. 0-87972-498-6 pbk. * Darden, Robert. ''People Get Ready: A New History of Black Gospel Music''. Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005, . * Downey, James C. ''The Gospel Hymn 1875–1930''. University of Southern Mississippi, MA, 1963. * Eskew, Harry. "Gospel Music, I" in ''
The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians ''The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians'' is an encyclopedic dictionary Title page from the 1894 four volume version of Robert Hunter's ''The Encyclopædic Dictionary''. An encyclopedic dictionary typically includes many short lis ...
'' (1980), VII, 549–554. * Hanson, Kenneth, ''The Hymnody and Hymnals of the Restoration Movement''. Butler University, BD, 1951. * Heilbut, Tony, ''The Gospel Sound: Good News and Bad Times'', Limelight Editions, 1997, . * McNeil, W. K., ed. ''Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music.'' Routledge, 2005. . * Marovich, Robert M., ''A City Called Heaven: Chicago and the Birth of Gospel Music.'' Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015. . * Mungons, Kevin and Douglas Yeo, ''Homer Rodeheaver and the Rise of the Gospel Music Industry.'' Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2021. . * Stevenson, Arthur L. ''The Story of Southern Hymnology.'' Roanoke, Virginia: Stone Printing and Manufacturing, 1931. * Zolten, Jerry. ''Great God A' Mighty!: The Dixie Hummingbirds—Celebrating The Rise of Soul Gospel Music.'' Oxford University Press, 2003. .


Archival sources


USC Gospel Music History Archive

Finding aid to Camille Taylor collection of Black Music Caucus Gospel Choir Competition recordings at Columbia University. Rare Book & Manuscript Library.


External links


Professional organizations


Gospel Music Association
– Acknowledges all forms of gospel/Christian music
Gospel Viu – Gospel Without Borders

Gospel Wire
– Primarily urban contemporary gospel
Pacific Gospel Music Association
– Known for Southern gospel
Southern Gospel Music Association

Gospel Music Information

Festival Lumen – the biggest gospel music festival in central Europe


Media outlets


Black Family Channel

Bobby Jones Gospel

Christian Broadcasting Network

Daystar Television Network

Gospel Music Channel

The Inspirational Network

Trinity Broadcasting NetworkKALO TV
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