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(That which you wish to be secret, tell to nobody) , named_for =
The Holy Trinity The Christian Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ (title), Christ'' and ''Christian ...

The Holy Trinity
, established = , sister_college =
Churchill College, Cambridge Churchill College is a constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) educat ...
, president = Dame
Hilary Boulding Dame Hilary Boulding, (born 25 January 1957) is a British academic administrator Academic administration is a branch of university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, highe ...
, location =
Broad StreetBroad Street may refer to: United Kingdom *Broad Street railway station (England), in London *Broad Street (ward), in London *Broad Street, Birmingham *Broad Street, Bristol *Broad Street, Oxford *Broad Street, Reading *Broad Street, Suffolk, hamle ...

Broad Street
, Oxford , coordinates = , location_map = Oxford (central) , undergraduates = 308 (2011/2012) , graduates = 125 , shield = , blazon = '' Per pale or and azure, on a chevron between three griffins' heads erased four fleurs-de-lis all counter-changed'' (arms of Sir Thomas Pope, Founder) , homepage = , boat_club
Boat Club
Trinity College (full name: The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)) is one of the constituent colleges of the
University of Oxford The University of Oxford is a collegiate university, collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the List of oldest universit ...
in England. The college was founded in 1555 by Sir
Thomas Pope Sir Thomas Pope (c. 150729 January 1559), was a prominent public servant in mid-16th-century England, a Member of Parliament, a wealthy landowner, and the founder of Trinity College, Oxford. Early life Pope was born at Deddington, near Ban ...

Thomas Pope
, on land previously occupied by
Durham College Durham College of Applied Arts and Technology is located in the Durham Region The Regional Municipality of Durham (), informally referred to as Durham Region, is a regional municipality#REDIRECT Regional municipality A regional municip ...
, home to
Benedictine The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a Christian monasticism, monastic Religious order (Catholic), religious order of the Catholic Church following the Rule of Saint Be ...
monks from
Durham Cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly known as Durham Cathedral and home of the Shrine of St Cuthbert, is a cathedral A cathedral is a church (building), church that contains the ...

Durham Cathedral
. Despite its large physical size, the college is relatively small in terms of student numbers at approximately 400. It was founded as a men's college and has been coeducational since 1979. As of 2018, Trinity had a
financial endowment A financial endowment is a legal structure for managing, and in many cases indefinitely perpetuating, a pool of financial Finance is the study of financial institutions, financial markets and how they operate within the financial system. It is ...
of £138.0 million. Trinity has produced three
British prime ministers#REDIRECT List of prime ministers of the United Kingdom {{Redirect category shell, {{R from move ...
, placing it third after
Christ Church Jesus; he, יֵשׁוּעַ, ''Yeshua, Yēšū́aʿ''; ar, عيسى, ʿĪsā ( 4 BC AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jews, Jewish preacher and religious leader. He is the central figu ...

Christ Church
and in terms of former students who have held that office.


History


Durham College

The site where Trinity College now stands was originally occupied by Durham College, built for
Benedictine The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a Christian monasticism, monastic Religious order (Catholic), religious order of the Catholic Church following the Rule of Saint Be ...
monks from
Durham Cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly known as Durham Cathedral and home of the Shrine of St Cuthbert, is a cathedral A cathedral is a church (building), church that contains the ...

Durham Cathedral
. This college had been founded after land was bought in 1291, though monks had been sent to Oxford for a few years previous to this. The site was surrendered to the crown in March 1545, being granted to private owners in 1553. They were then acquired by civil servant
Thomas Pope Sir Thomas Pope (c. 150729 January 1559), was a prominent public servant in mid-16th-century England, a Member of Parliament, a wealthy landowner, and the founder of Trinity College, Oxford. Early life Pope was born at Deddington, near Ban ...

Thomas Pope
on 20 February 1555 (February 1554 as then was), who used them to found Trinity College 16 days later. Durham College was originally dedicated to the Virgin Mary,
St Cuthbert Cuthbert (c. 634 – 20 March 687), possibly Cutimbetas/ Stombast, was an Anglo-Saxon The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United King ...
, and the Trinity, and it is thought that Trinity College took its name from the last element of this dedication.


Trinity College

Trinity College was founded in 1555 by Sir
Thomas Pope Sir Thomas Pope (c. 150729 January 1559), was a prominent public servant in mid-16th-century England, a Member of Parliament, a wealthy landowner, and the founder of Trinity College, Oxford. Early life Pope was born at Deddington, near Ban ...

Thomas Pope
, on land bought following the abolition of Durham College during the period of
Protestant Reformation The Reformation (alternatively named the Protestant Reformation or the European Reformation) was a major movement within Western Christianity Western Christianity is one of two sub-divisions of Christianity Christianity is an Abra ...
, whose buildings housed the original foundation. Pope was a
Catholic The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian ...

Catholic
who had no surviving children, and he hoped that by founding a college he would be remembered in the prayers of its students. His remains are still encased beside the chapel altar. The original foundation provided for a president, 12
fellowsFellows may refer to Fellow, in plural form. Fellows or Fellowes may also refer to: Places *Fellows, California, USA *Fellows, Wisconsin, ghost town, USA Other uses *Fellows Auctioneers, established in 1876. *Fellowes, Inc., manufacturer of worksp ...
, and 12 scholars, and for up to 20 undergraduates. The fellows were required to take
Holy Orders In certain Christian churches Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Criticism of the Catholic Church ...
and to remain unmarried. The college remained an all-male institution until 1979, when (in common with a number of other Oxford colleges) it admitted its first women undergraduates. It is now fully
co-educational Mixed-sex education, also known as mixed-gender education, co-education, or coeducation (abbreviated to co-ed or coed), is a system of education Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills ...
and co-residential. Between 2015 and 2017, 41.1% of UK undergraduates admitted to Trinity came from state schools. Trinity was one of the locations used for filming of the original series ''
Brideshead Revisited ''Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder'' is a novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (; 28 October 1903 – 10 April 1966) was an English writer of novels, biographies, ...
''; its grounds were also, in part, the basis for Fleet College in ''
The Last Enchantments ''The Last Enchantments'' is a novel by American author Charles Finch. It was published by St. Martin’s Press and released on January 28, 2014. Plot ''The Last Enchantments'' tells the story of American graduate student Will Baker, and his relati ...
''. Trinity has also featured heavily in episodes of ''
Inspector Morse Detective A detective is an investigator, usually a member of a law enforcement agency. They often collect information to solve crimes by talking to witnesses and informants, collecting physical evidence, or searching records in databases. ...
'', ''
Lewis Lewis may refer to: Names * Lewis (given name), including a list of people with the given name * Lewis (surname), including a list of people with the surname Music * Lewis (musician), Canadian singer * "Lewis (Mistreated)", a song by Radiohead ...
'' and ''
Endeavour Endeavour or endeavor may refer to: * Action (philosophy) An action is an event that an agent performs for a purpose, that is guided by the person's intention Intentions are mental states in which the agent commits themselves to a course o ...
''. Dame
Hilary Boulding Dame Hilary Boulding, (born 25 January 1957) is a British academic administrator Academic administration is a branch of university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, highe ...
, formerly principal of the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, succeeded Sir Ivor Roberts as president in August 2017.


Trinity–Balliol rivalry

For many years, there has been a traditional and fierce rivalry shown between the students of Trinity and those of its immediate neighbour to the west,
Balliol College Balliol College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford The University of Oxford , mottoeng = The Lord is my light , established = , endowment = £6.1 billion (including colleges) (2019) , budget = ...

Balliol College
. It has manifested itself on the sports field and the river; in the form of songs (of greater or less offensiveness) sung over the dividing walls; and in the form of "raids" on the other college. The rivalry is also reflected in that which exists between
Trinity College, Cambridge Trinity College is a constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) education ...
and Balliol's sister college,
St John's College, Cambridge St John's College is a constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) educatio ...

St John's College, Cambridge
though the two Trinities are not themselves sister colleges. In college
folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the tradition A tradition is a belief A belief is an attitude Attitude may refer to: Philosophy and psychology * Attitude (psycholog ...

folklore
, the rivalry goes back to the late 17th century, when
Ralph Bathurst Ralph Bathurst, Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS (1620 – 14 June 1704) was an England, English theologian and physician. Early life He was born in Hothorpe Hall, Hothorpe, Northamptonshire in 1620 and educated at King Henry VIII School, Covent ...

Ralph Bathurst
, president of Trinity, was supposedly observed throwing stones at Balliol's windows. In fact, although the first antagonism was recorded in 1583, the rivalry in its modern form appears to date from the late 1890s, when the chant or song known as a "Gordouli" began to be sung from the Balliol side. The traditional words run: Although these words are now rarely heard, the singing of songs over the wall is still known as "a Gordouli". The traditional Gordouli is said to have been sung by Balliol and Trinity men in the trenches of
Mesopotamia Mesopotamia ( grc, Μεσοποταμία ''Mesopotamíā''; ar, بِلَاد ٱلرَّافِدَيْن ; syc, ܐܪܡ ܢܗܪ̈ܝܢ, or , ) is a historical region of Western Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in th ...
during the
First World War World War I, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war A world war is "a war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainmen ...

First World War
. The rivalry was given an extra edge in the early 20th century by the contrast between the
radical Radical may refer to: Arts and entertainment Music *Radical (mixtape), ''Radical'' (mixtape), by Odd Future, 2010 *Radical (Every Time I Die album), ''Radical'' (Every Time I Die album), 2021 *Radical (Smack album), ''Radical'' (Smack album), 1988 ...
tendencies of many Balliol students and Trinity's traditional conservatism and social exclusivity. The president of Trinity between 1907 and 1938 was Herbert Blakiston, who became notorious for his reluctance to admit non-white students. Notably, he stubbornly resisted pressure from the
India Office 275px, The western or park end of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's building in 1866. It was then occupied by the Foreign and India Offices, while the Home and Colonial Offices occupied the Whitehall Whitehall is a road and area in the C ...
to admit undergraduates from
British India The Provinces of India, earlier Presidencies of British India and still earlier, Presidency towns, were the administrative divisions of British governance in the Indian subcontinent. Collectively, they have been called British India. In one ...

British India
, something that government department was attempting to promote. Balliol in contrast did admit a number of Indian and Asiatic students which gave many of the taunts from the Trinity side a distinctly
racist Racism is the belief that groups of humans possess different behavioral traits corresponding to inherited attributes and can be divided based on the superiority Superior may refer to: *Superior (hierarchy), something which is higher in a hi ...

racist
tone: Balliol students, for example, were sometime referred to as " Basutos". In ''
Five Red Herrings ''The Five Red Herrings'' (also ''The 5 Red Herrings'') is a 1931 novel by Dorothy L. Sayers, her sixth featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. In the United States it was published in the same year under the title ''Suspicious Characters''. Foreword The ...
'' (1931), a
Lord Peter Wimsey Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey (later 17th Duke of Denver) is the fictional protagonist in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers (and their continuation by Jill Paton Walsh). A dilettante Dilettante or dilettant ...
novel by
Dorothy L. Sayers Dorothy Leigh Sayers (; 13 June 1893 – 17 December 1957) was an English crime writer and poet. She was also a student of classical and modern languages. She is best known for her mysteries, a series of novels and short stories set between the F ...

Dorothy L. Sayers
, Lord Peter (a Balliol man) is asked whether he remembers a certain contemporary from Trinity. "'I never knew any Trinity men,' said Wimsey. 'The Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans.'" Sayers also alludes to the rivalry in ''
Murder Must Advertise ''Murder Must Advertise'' is a 1933 mystery novel by Dorothy L. Sayers, the eighth in her series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. Most of the action of the novel takes place in an advertising agency, a setting with which Sayers was familiar as she ...
'' (1933): Mr Ingleby, a Trinity man, comments, "If there is one thing more repulsive than another it is Balliolity." One of the wittier raids from Balliol, in 1962 or 1963, involved the turfing of the whole of Trinity JCR (complete with daffodils). One of the most famous incidents was perpetrated by three Trinity students (Richard Todd, Richard Cohen and Deidrie Small) on the new intake of freshers to Balliol in October 1985. They sent personally addressed letters to each of Balliol's new freshers on Balliol headed notepaper. It enclosed a narrow neck 100ml screw-top receptacle. The attached letter read, "Dear Welcome to Balliol. As you are aware the university requires a short medical check-up as part of your Coming-Up. Could you therefore please provide a urine sample in the attached sample bottle and return it to your college tutor's office by no later than 5.00 PM on Wednesday." The letters were sent out on that Wednesday evening. Balliol admitted to some 57 being returned. The incident was subsequently reported in the ''Daily Express'' under the headline, "students play wee joke on neighbours". The incident concluded with Todd and Cohen unfurling a banner over Balliol reading, "We are Balliol. Please Don't Take The Piss!". The last incident suspected to relate to the feud was the vandalism of Trinity's SCR pond in 2010, which led to the death of all but one of the fish.


Buildings

The main entrance to the college is on
Broad StreetBroad Street may refer to: United Kingdom *Broad Street railway station (England), in London *Broad Street (ward), in London *Broad Street, Birmingham *Broad Street, Bristol *Broad Street, Oxford *Broad Street, Reading *Broad Street, Suffolk, hamle ...

Broad Street
, located between
Balliol College Balliol College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford The University of Oxford , mottoeng = The Lord is my light , established = , endowment = £6.1 billion (including colleges) (2019) , budget = ...

Balliol College
and
Blackwell's Blackwell UK, also known as Blackwell's and Blackwell Group, is a British academic An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary education, secondary or tertiary education, tertiar ...
bookshop, and opposite
Turl Street Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) ...
. It is enclosed by an iron palisade rather than a wall, and the college's distinctive blue gates provide it with a more open and accessible appearance than many others in Oxford. The rear of the college backs onto St John's College, and has entrances on both St Giles' and
Parks Road Parks Road is a road in Oxford, England, with several Oxford University colleges along its route. It runs north–south from the Banbury Road and Norham Gardens at the northern end, where it continues into Bradmore Road, to the junction with Broa ...
. As well as its four major quadrangles, the college also boasts a large lawn and gardens, which include a small area of woodland.


Durham quadrangle

Durham College was built around a single quadrangle, now known as the Durham quadrangle.


Chapel

The chapel, though relatively modest in size compared to some of its Oxford counterparts, was the first college chapel to be designed entirely in the
Baroque The Baroque (, ; ) is a style Style is a manner of doing or presenting things and may refer to: * Architectural style, the features that make a building or structure historically identifiable * Design, the process of creating something * Fashi ...

Baroque
style. It was designed by
Henry Aldrich Henry Aldrich (1647 – 14 December 1710) was an English theologian, philosopher, and composer. Life Aldrich was educated at Westminster School (God Gives the Increase) , established = Earliest records date from the 14th century, ref ...
, with advice from
Christopher Wren Sir Christopher Wren PRS FRS FRS may also refer to: Government and politics * Facility Registry System, a centrally managed Environmental Protection Agency database that identifies places of environmental interest in the United States * Fa ...

Christopher Wren
, and was consecrated in 1694. On the top of the west tower sit four female statues, which represent Astronomy, Geometry, Medicine and Theology.


Garden Quadrangle

The north side of the quad was designed by Christopher Wren and built in 1665–1668 as a freestanding block to the north of the Durham quad. The west side was added to the same plan in 1682.


Front quadrangle

The front quadrangle between the Durham quadrangle and Broad Street was formed by the new buildings (1883–1885) and the president's lodgings (1885–1887), both designed by
Thomas Graham Jackson Sir Thomas Graham Jackson, 1st Baronet (21 December 1835 – 7 November 1924) was one of the most distinguished British architect An architect is a person who plans, designs and oversees the construction of buildings. To practice architec ...

Thomas Graham Jackson
. It also includes some older buildings on Broad Street: four old cottages and Kettell Hall, a stone house built by President
Ralph Kettell Ralph Kettell (1563–1643) was an English college head, the third President of Trinity College, Oxford. In a long tenure he built up the college both in terms of architecture and its academic reputation. Life He was the third son of John Kettell, ...
in around 1620.


Library quadrangle

The library quadrangle is located between Jackson's new buildings and the new library of 1925–1928, built as a memorial to members of the college who perished in
World War I World War I, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war A world war is "a war engaged in by all or most of the principal nations of the world". The term is usually reserved for ...

World War I
. The building was designed by architect Mr. J. Osborne Smith, with the ornate barrel roof created by the leading architectural designer
Leonard Shuffrey Leonard Shuffrey (1852–1926) was a British architect and architectural designer of the late Victorian and Edwardian period. Shuffrey was a leading figure of the aesthetic movement that had a significant impact on the development of buildings a ...

Leonard Shuffrey
. The Cumberbatch buildings to the north and south were designed by Maguire and Murray and built in 1964–1966. The Norrington Room (named after Sir Arthur Norrington, a former president of the college) of Blackwells bookshop lies underneath the quad. In 2018 the college gained planning permission for a new building, designed by
ADAM Architecture ADAM Architecture is an architecture upright=1.45, alt=Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Brionne (dessin) De Cotte 2503c – Gallica 2011 (adjusted), Plan of the second floor (attic storey) of the Hôtel de Brionne in Paris ...
, to the north of the library quadrangle and the university's
Weston Library The Weston Library is part of the Bodleian Library The Bodleian Library () is the main research library A research library is a library A library is a collection of materials, books or media that are easily accessible for use and not ...
, which would open in 2021 and replace the northern Cumberbatch building.


Student life

The college offers accommodation to all undergraduate students. First and second years are housed on the college's main site, and third and fourth years in college buildings on the Woodstock Road.


Chapel Choir

The Trinity College Chapel Choir consists of up to eight choral scholars and over thirty voluntary singers. The college has one of the largest chapel choirs in the university with the majority of members from within the college. The choir sing a weekly
Evensong Evensong is a church service traditionally held near sunset focused on singing psalms and other biblical canticles. In origin, it is identical to the canonical hour of vespers. Old English speakers translated the Latin word as , which became ' ...
on a Sunday with occasional weekly services to mark college events. Trinity College has no music director, and responsibility falls to the
organ scholar An organ scholar is a young musician employed as a part-time assistant organist An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ Organ may refer to: Biology * Organ (anatomy) An organ is a group of Tissue (biology), tissues with simil ...
s and is overseen by the
chaplain A chaplain is, traditionally, a cleric Clergy are formal leaders within established religion Religion is a social system, social-cultural system of designated religious behaviour, behaviors and practices, morality, morals, beliefs, wo ...

chaplain
. The choir goes on annual tours, recent tours include Dublin in 2008, where they sang concerts and a Sung Eucharist in , Rome in Summer 2009, Paris in 2010, Barcelona in 2011 and Vienna in 2012. In 2009, the choir released a CD, called 'A Voice from Afar', directed by then-organ scholar, Catherine Wallace.


Notable former students

In over four centuries of its history, Trinity has produced a number of notable students who have led careers in fields such as; academia, politics, science, religions and the arts. File:John Henry Newman by Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Bt.jpg,
St John Henry Newman John Henry Newman, Congregation of the Oratory, C.O. (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was an English theologian, scholar and poet, first an Anglican ministry, Anglican priest and later a Catholic priest and Cardinal (Catholic Church ...

St John Henry Newman
, theologian, poet and Cardinal of the Catholic Church File:William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham by William Hoare.jpg,
William Pitt the Elder William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, (15 November 170811 May 1778) was a British statesman of the Whig Whig or Whigs may refer to: Parties and factions In the British Isles * A pejorative nickname for the Kirk Party The Kirk Party were ...
, former
Prime Minister of Great Britain The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government The head of government is either the highest or second-highest official in the executive Executive may refer to: Role, title, or function * Executive (government), b ...
File:Nathaniel Dance Lord North.jpg,
Frederick North, Lord North Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (13 April 17325 August 1792), better known by his courtesy title Courtesy (from the word ''courteis'', from the 12th century) is gentle politeness and courtly manners. In the Middle Ages I ...
, former
Prime Minister of Great Britain The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government The head of government is either the highest or second-highest official in the executive Executive may refer to: Role, title, or function * Executive (government), b ...
File:Portrait of Henry G.J. Moseley, 1887-1915, in lab holding a glass globe, from Nature magazine (cropped).jpg,
Henry Moseley Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (; 23 November 1887 – 10 August 1915) was an English physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empir ...
, physicist and discoverer of
Moseley's law Moseley's law is an empirical law concerning the characteristic X-ray#Physics, x-rays emitted by atoms. The law had been discovered and published by the English physicist Henry Moseley in 1913-1914. Until Moseley's work, "atomic number" was merely ...
File:Spencer Compton 1st Earl of Wilmington.jpg,
Spencer Compton, 1st Earl of Wilmington Spencer Compton, 1st Earl of Wilmington, (2 July 1743) was a British Whig statesman who served continuously in government from 1715 until his death. He sat in the House of Commons of England, English and British House of Commons between 1698 a ...
, former
Prime Minister of Great Britain The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government The head of government is either the highest or second-highest official in the executive Executive may refer to: Role, title, or function * Executive (government), b ...
File:Jacob Rees-Mogg MP.jpg,
Jacob Rees-Mogg Jacob William Rees-Mogg (born 24 May 1969) is a British politician serving as Leader of the House of Commons The Leader of the House of Commons is generally a member or attendee of the cabinet of the United Kingdom. The House of Commons dev ...
,
Leader of the House of Commons The leader of the House of Commons is generally a member or attendee of the cabinet of the United Kingdom. The House of Commons devotes approximately three-quarters of its time to debating and explaining government business, such as Bill (law), ...
and
Lord President of the Council The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State (United Kingdom), Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal, Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal. ...
File:RichardFrancisBurton.jpeg,
Sir Richard Burton Sir Richard Francis Burton (; 19 March 1821 – 20 October 1890) was a British explorer, writer, scholar, and soldier. He was famed for his travels and explorations in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, as well as his extraordinary knowledge of ...
, explorer and writer File:Ronald Syme.jpg, Sir Ronald Syme, Roman historian File:Koning Filip van België.jpg,
Philippe of Belgium Philippe or Filip ( nl, Filip Leopold Lodewijk Maria ; french: Philippe Léopold Louis Marie ; born 15 April 1960) is King of the Belgians. He is the eldest child of Albert II of Belgium, King Albert II and Queen Paola. He succeeded his father upo ...
,
King of the Belgians Belgium is a Constitutional monarchy, constitutional, Inheritance, hereditary, and popular monarchy. The monarch is titled king or queen of the Belgians ( nl, Koning(in) der Belgen, french: Roi / Reine des Belges}, german: König(in) der Be ...
as of 2013


Gallery

Back Lawns, Trinity College, Oxford.jpg, Back Lawns of Trinity looking towards Garden Quad File:Front Quad, Trinity College, Oxford.jpg, Front Quad looking towards Staircase VII File:Bust of Cardinal Newman, Trinity College, Oxford.jpg, Bust of
Cardinal Newman John Henry Newman, Congregation of the Oratory, C.O. (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was an English theologian, scholar and poet, first an Anglican ministry, Anglican priest and later a Catholic priest and Cardinal (Catholic Church ...
outside Garden Quad File:'The Wilderness' - Trinity College, Oxford.jpg, 'The Wilderness' File:High table at trinity college oxford.jpg, Dining hall at Trinity College File:Chapel at Trinity college oxford.jpg, Alternative view inside the Chapel File:Lawn - trinity college Oxford.jpg, From the lawn looking towards
Wadham College Wadham College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford The University of Oxford is a collegiate university, collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making ...
File:Residential building at trinity college oxford.jpg, The Jackson Building (Staircase VI in Front Quadrangle)


References

Bibliography * * Kemp, Martin (2014). ''The Chapel of Trinity College, Oxford''. With photographs by
Tim Rawle Tim Rawle is an English architectural photographer File:Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Brionne (dessin) De Cotte 2503c – Gallica 2011 (adjusted).jpg, upright=1.45, alt=Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Br ...
. London: Scala Arts & Heritage Publishers. 88 pp.


External links


History of the College''Google Streetview'' Tour of TrinityVirtual Tour of TrinityTrinity College JCRTrinity College MCRTrinity College Boatclub
{{Authority control Colleges of the University of Oxford 1555 establishments in England Educational institutions established in the 1550s Grade I listed buildings in Oxford Grade I listed educational buildings Buildings and structures of the University of Oxford