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The New School is a
private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly two decades from the charts. Both "In Pri ...
research university A research university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in v ...
in
New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of ...

New York City
. It was founded in 1919 as The New School for Social Research with an original mission dedicated to academic freedom and intellectual inquiry and a home for progressive thinkers. Since then, the school has grown to house five divisions within the university. These include the
Parsons School of Design Parsons School of Design, known colloquially as Parsons, is a Private school, private art and design college located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is one of the five colleges of The New School. Th ...
, the
Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, commonly referred to as Lang, is the seminar A seminar is a form of academic instruction, either at an academic institution Academic institution is an educational institution An educational institution is a ...
, the College of Performing Arts which consists of the
Mannes School of Music Mannes School of Music is a Music school, music conservatory in The New School, a private research university in New York City. In the fall of 2015, Mannes moved from its previous location on Upper West Side, Manhattan's Upper West Side to join t ...
, the
School of Drama A drama school, stage school or theatre school is an undergraduate and/or graduate school or academic department, department at a college or university; or a free-standing institution (such as the Drama section at the Juilliard School); which sp ...
, and the School of Jazz and Contemporary Music,
The New School for Social Research The New School for Social Research (NSSR) is an educational institution that is part of The New School The New School is a private research university A research university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an e ...
, and the Schools of Public Engagement. In addition, the university maintains the
Parsons Paris Parsons Paris is a degree-granting school of art and design in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. It is the European branch campus of Parsons School of Design and part of The New School, a comprehensive university in New York City. Academi ...
campus and has also launched or housed a range of institutions, such as the international research institute World Policy Institute, the Philip Glass Institute, the
Vera List Center for Art and Politics The Vera List Center for Art and Politics (the Center) is a nonprofit research organization and public forum for art, culture, and politics. Established at The New School in 1992 during a time of rousing public debates about freedom of speech, the ...
, the India China Institute, the Observatory on Latin America, and the Center for New York City Affairs. It is classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity". Approximately 10,000 students are enrolled in
undergraduate Undergraduate education ieducationconducted after secondary education and prior to postgraduate education. It typically includes all postsecondary programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry-level ...
and
postgraduate Postgraduate education (graduate education in North America North America is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasses. Generally identified by convention (norm), convention rather than any strict criteria, u ...
programs and disciplines including
design A design is a plan or specification for the construction of an object or system or for the implementation of an activity or process, or the result of that plan or specification in the form of a prototype A prototype is an early sample, mode ...

design
,
social science Social science is the branch A branch ( or , ) or tree branch (sometimes referred to in botany Botany, also called , plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist o ...

social science
s,
music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elements such as (which governs and ), (and its associated concepts , , and ...

music
,
liberal arts Liberal arts education (from Latin "free" and "art or principled practice") is the traditional academic program in Western higher education. ''Liberal arts'' takes the term ''Art (skill), art'' in the sense of a learned skill rather than spec ...
,
humanities Humanities are academic disciplines An academic discipline or academic field is a subdivision of knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity or awareness, of someone or something, such as facts A fact is an occurrence in the real world. ...

humanities
,
architecture upright=1.45, alt=Plan d'exécution du second étage de l'hôtel de Brionne (dessin) De Cotte 2503c – Gallica 2011 (adjusted), Plan of the second floor (attic storey) of the Hôtel de Brionne in Paris – 1734. Architecture (Latin ''archi ...

architecture
,
fine arts In European academic traditions, fine art is developed primarily for aesthetics Aesthetics, or esthetics (), is a branch of philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is the study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about e ...
,
design A design is a plan or specification for the construction of an object or system or for the implementation of an activity or process, or the result of that plan or specification in the form of a prototype A prototype is an early sample, mode ...

design
, drama, finance,
psychology Psychology is the scientific Science () is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity or awareness, of someone or something, such as facts A fact is an occurrence in the real world. ...

psychology
, and
public policy Public policy is an institutionalized proposal to solve relevant and real-world problems, guided by a conception and implemented by programs as a course of action created and/or enacted, typically by a government A government is th ...
. Its faculty and alumni include numerous notable businesspeople, political figures, fashion designers, journalists, musicians, and artists. Notable students and alumni who have achieved prominence in political and business fields include economist
Heather Boushey Heather Marie BousheyThe New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New Yo ...
, a member of President
Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. ( ; born November 20, 1942) is an American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of th ...

Joe Biden
's
Council of Economic Advisers The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) is a United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North Ame ...

Council of Economic Advisers
;
Chris Hughes Chris Hughes (born November 26, 1983) is an American entrepreneur Entrepreneurship is the creation or extraction of value. With this definition, entrepreneurship is viewed as change, generally entailing risk beyond what is normally encount ...

Chris Hughes
, co-founder of
Facebook Facebook is an American online social media and social networking service owned by Meta Platforms. Founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg with fellow Harvard College students and roommates Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, an ...

Facebook
; Douglas Cliggott, former chief investment strategist for
JPMorgan Chase JPMorgan Chase & Co. is an American multinational Multinational may refer to: * Multinational corporation, a corporate organization operating in multiple countries * Multinational force, a military body from multiple countries * Multinational ...

JPMorgan Chase
; entrepreneur Stewart Krentzman, formerly an executive at
Oki Electric Industry , commonly referred to as OKI, OKI Electric or the OKI Group, is a Japanese information and communications technology Information and communications technology (ICT) is an extensional term for information technology (IT) that stresses the role ...
; former
President of Israel President most commonly refers to: *President (corporate title) A president is a leader of an organization, company, community, club, trade union, university or other group. The relationship between a president and a chief executive officer ...
Shimon Peres Shimon Peres (; he, שמעון פרס ; born Szymon Perski; 2 August 1923 – 28 September 2016) was an Israeli politician who served as the ninth In music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, ...

Shimon Peres
; and former Brazilian
Minister of Finance A finance minister is an executive or cabinet Cabinet or The Cabinet may refer to: Furniture * Cabinetry, a box-shaped piece of furniture with doors and/or drawers * Display cabinet, a piece of furniture with one or more transparent glass she ...
Nelson Barbosa. In the arts, notable alumni include the artist-activist
Harry Belafonte Harry Belafonte (born Harold George Bellanfanti Jr., March 1, 1927) is an American singer, songwriter, activist, and actor. One of the most successful Jamaican-American pop stars, as he popularised the Trinbagonian Caribbean The Caribbean ( ...

Harry Belafonte
; fashion designers Alexander Wang,
Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs (born April 9, 1963) is an American fashion designer. He is the head designer for his own fashion label, ''Marc Jacobs'', and formerly ''Marc by Marc Jacobs'', a diffusion lineA diffusion line (also known as a bridge line) is a seco ...

Marc Jacobs
, and
Donna Karan Donna Karan (, born Donna Ivy Faske; October 2, 1948), also known as "DK", is an American fashion designer and the creator of the Donna Karan New York and DKNY clothing labels. Early life Karan was born Donna Ivy Faske to mother Helen "Queenie" ...
; actors
Marlon Brando Marlon Brando Jr. (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004) was an American actor with a career spanning 60 years, during which he won many accolades, including two Academy Awards for Best Actor, three BAFTA Awards for Best Foreign Actor and two Go ...
,
Tony Curtis Tony Curtis (born Bernard Schwartz; June 3, 1925September 29, 2010) was an American actor whose career spanned six decades, achieving the height of his popularity in the 1950s and early 1960s. He acted in more than 100 films in roles covering a ...

Tony Curtis
,
Rod Steiger Rodney Stephen Steiger (April 14, 1925July 9, 2002) was an American actor, known for his portrayal of offbeat, often volatile and crazed characters. Cited as "one of Hollywood's most charismatic and dynamic stars," he is closely associated with t ...

Rod Steiger
,
Bea Arthur Beatrice Arthur (born Bernice Frankel; May 13, 1922 – April 25, 2009) was an American actress, comedian and activist. Arthur began her career on stage in 1947. She won the 1966 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical The Tony ...

Bea Arthur
, and
Bradley Cooper Bradley Charles Cooper (born January 5, 1975) is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been nominated for various awards, including eight Academy Awards The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are awards for artistic an ...
; jazz legend
Bill Evans William John Evans (August 16, 1929 – September 15, 1980) was an American jazz Jazz is a music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arranging sounds in ...

Bill Evans
; trumpeter/composer
Roy Hargrove Roy Anthony Hargrove (October 16, 1969 – November 2, 2018) was an American jazz trumpeter. He won worldwide notice after winning two Grammy Awards for differing types of music in 1997 and in 2002. Hargrove primarily played in the hard bop st ...

Roy Hargrove
; songwriter
Burt Bacharach Burt Freeman Bacharach ( ; born May 12, 1928) is an American composer, songwriter, record producer, and pianist thumb The thumb is the first digit of the hand A hand is a prehensile, multi- fingered appendage located at the end of the fo ...

Burt Bacharach
; soprano
Frederica von Stade Frederica "Flicka" von Stade Gorman Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, OAL (born June 1, 1945) is a semi-retired American opera singer. Since her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1970, she has performed in operas, musicals, concerts and recitals in venues ...

Frederica von Stade
; playwright
Lorraine Hansberry Lorraine Vivian Hansberry (May 19, 1930 – January 12, 1965) was a playwright and writer. She was the first African-American African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group An ethnic gro ...
; composer
John Cage John Milton Cage Jr. (September 5, 1912 – August 12, 1992) was an American composer A composer (Latin wikt:compono, ''compōnō''; literally "one who puts together") is a person who writes musical composition, music, especially classical ...
; and painter
Norman Rockwell Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was an American painter and illustrator. His works have a broad popular appeal in the United States for their reflection of American culture The culture of the United States ...
.


History


Name

From its founding in 1919 by
progressive Progressive may refer to: Politics * Progressivism is a political philosophy in support of social reform Political organizations * Congressional Progressive Caucus, members within the Democratic Party in the United States Congress dedicated to th ...
New York educators, largely former
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a Private university, private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of ...

Columbia University
faculty that objected to a mandatory loyalty oath, and for most of its history, the university was known as The New School for Social Research. Between 1997 and 2005 it was known as New School University. The university and each of its colleges were renamed in 2005. The New School established the University in Exile and the École libre des hautes études in 1933 as a graduate division to serve as an academic haven for scholars escaping from
Nazi Germany Nazi Germany, (lit. "National Socialist State"), ' (lit. "Nazi State") for short; also ' (lit. "National Socialist Germany") officially known as the German Reich from 1933 until 1943, and the Greater German Reich from 1943 to 1945, was ...

Nazi Germany
among other adversarial regimes in
Europe Europe is a continent A continent is any of several large landmass A landmass, or land mass, is a large region In geography Geography (from Greek: , ''geographia'', literally "earth description") is a field of scienc ...

Europe
.Ira Katznelson, "Reflections on the New School's Founding Moments, 1919 and 1933". ''Social Research'' (2009) 76#2 pp: 395-410
online
In 1934, the University in Exile was chartered by
New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspaper in Col ...
and its name was changed to the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science. In 2005, it adopted what had initially been the name of the whole institution, the New School for Social Research, while the larger institution was renamed The New School.NSSR, About Us, History
retrieved 9 January 2017.


Founding

The New School for Social Research was founded by a group of university professors and intellectuals in 1919 as a modern, progressive, free school where adult students could "seek an unbiased understanding of the existing order, its genesis, growth and present working"."Research School to Open". ''
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
'' (30 September 1919).
Founders included economist and literary scholar Alvin Johnson, historians Charles A. Beard and
James Harvey Robinson James Harvey Robinson (June 29, 1863 in Bloomington, Illinois Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of McLean County, Illinois, McLean County, Illinois, United States. It is adjacent to Normal, Illinois, Normal, and is the more populous of ...
, economist
Thorstein Veblen Thorstein Bunde Veblen (July 30, 1857 – August 3, 1929) was a Norwegian-American economist and Sociology, sociologist who, during his lifetime, emerged as a well-known Criticism of capitalism, critic of capitalism. In his best-known book, ''T ...
, and philosophers Horace M. Kallen and
John Dewey John Dewey (; October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher A philosopher is someone who practices philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is the study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about reason, Meta ...
. Several founders were former professors at
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a Private university, private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of ...

Columbia University
. In October 1917, after Columbia University imposed a
loyalty oath A loyalty oath is a pledge of allegiance to an organization An organization, or organisation (Commonwealth English The use of the English language English is a of the , originally spoken by the inhabitants of . It is name ...
to the United States upon the entire faculty and student body, it fired several professors. Charles A. Beard, Professor of Political Science, resigned his professorship at Columbia in protest. His colleague
James Harvey Robinson James Harvey Robinson (June 29, 1863 in Bloomington, Illinois Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of McLean County, Illinois, McLean County, Illinois, United States. It is adjacent to Normal, Illinois, Normal, and is the more populous of ...
resigned in 1919 to join the faculty at the New School. The New School plan was to offer the rigorousness of postgraduate education without degree matriculation or degree prerequisites. It was theoretically open to anyone, as the adult division today called Schools of Public Engagement remains. The first classes at the New School took the form of lectures followed by discussions, for larger groups, or as smaller conferences, for "those equipped for specific research". In the first semester, 100 courses, mostly in economics and politics, were offered by an ad hoc faculty that included , Charles A. Beard, Horace M. Kallen,
Harold Laski Harold Joseph Laski (30 June 1893 – 24 March 1950) was an English political theorist and economist. He was active in politics and served as the chairman of the British Labour Party from 1945 to 1946 and was a professor at the London School of ...
,
Wesley Clair Mitchell Wesley Clair Mitchell (August 5, 1874 – October 29, 1948) was an American economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the branch The branches and leaves of a tree. A branch ...

Wesley Clair Mitchell
,
Thorstein Veblen Thorstein Bunde Veblen (July 30, 1857 – August 3, 1929) was a Norwegian-American economist and Sociology, sociologist who, during his lifetime, emerged as a well-known Criticism of capitalism, critic of capitalism. In his best-known book, ''T ...
,
James Harvey Robinson James Harvey Robinson (June 29, 1863 in Bloomington, Illinois Bloomington is a city in and the county seat of McLean County, Illinois, McLean County, Illinois, United States. It is adjacent to Normal, Illinois, Normal, and is the more populous of ...
,
Graham Wallas Graham Wallas (31 May 1858 – 9 August 1932) was an English Socialism, socialist, social psychologist, educationalist, a leader of the Fabian Society and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Biography Born in Monkwearmouth, Sunderla ...

Graham Wallas
, Charles B. Davenport,
Elsie Clews Parsons Elsie Worthington Clews Parsons (November 27, 1875 – December 19, 1941) was an American anthropologistAn anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology. Anthropology is the study of aspects of humans within past and present ...
, and
Roscoe Pound Nathan Roscoe Pound (October 27, 1870 – June 30, 1964) was an American legal scholar and educator. He served as Dean of the University of Nebraska College of Law The University of Nebraska College of Law is one of the professional graduate scho ...
. Only after did the New School begin to offer degrees in line with the traditional university model.
John Cage John Milton Cage Jr. (September 5, 1912 – August 12, 1992) was an American composer A composer (Latin wikt:compono, ''compōnō''; literally "one who puts together") is a person who writes musical composition, music, especially classical ...
later pioneered the subject of Experimental Composition at the school.


Motto

The New School uses "To the Living Spirit" as its motto. In 1937,
Thomas Mann Paul Thomas Mann ( , ; ; 6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and the 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature ) , image = Nobel Prize.png , caption = , awarded_ ...
remarked that a plaque bearing the inscription "be the Living Spirit" had been torn down by the Nazis from a building at the
University of Heidelberg } Heidelberg University, officially the Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg, (german: Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; la, Universitas Ruperto Carola Heidelbergensis) is a public university, public research university in Heidelberg, B ...
. He suggested that the University in Exile adopt that inscription as its motto, to indicate that the 'living spirit,' mortally threatened in Europe, would have a home in this country. Alvin Johnson adopted that idea, and the motto continues to guide the division in its present-day endeavors


University in Exile

The Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science was founded in 1933 as the University in Exile for scholars who had been dismissed from teaching positions by the Italian
fascist Fascism () is a form of far-right Far-right politics, also referred to as the extreme right or right-wing extremism, are politics further on the right of the left–right political spectrum than the standard political right, particular ...

fascist
s or had to flee
Nazi Nazism ( ), officially National Socialism (german: Nationalsozialismus, ), is the ideology An ideology () is a set of belief A belief is an Attitude (psychology), attitude that something is the case, or that some proposition about th ...
Germany. The University in Exile was initially founded by the director of the New School, Alvin Johnson, through the financial contributions of Hiram Halle and the
Rockefeller Foundation '' The Rockefeller Foundation is an American private foundation A private foundation is a charitable organization that, while serving a good cause, might or might not qualify as a public charity by government standards. The Bill & Melinda Gates ...
. The University in Exile and its subsequent incarnations have been the intellectual heart of the New School. Notable scholars associated with the University in Exile include psychologists
Erich Fromm Erich Seligmann Fromm (; ; March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was a German social psychologist Social psychology is the scientific study of how the thoughts, feelings, and behavior Behavior (American English) or behaviour (Britis ...

Erich Fromm
,
Max Wertheimer Max Wertheimer (April 15, 1880 – October 12, 1943) was an Austro-Hungarian Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy, was a constitutional monarchy A constitutional monarchy is a form of ...
and Aron Gurwitsch, political theorists
Hannah Arendt Hannah Arendt (, also , ; 14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975) was a German-born American political theorist. Her many books and articles have had a lasting influence on political theory and philosophy. Arendt is widely considered one of ...
and
Leo Strauss Leo Strauss (, ; September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973) was a German-American German Americans (german: Deutschamerikaner, ) are Americans who have full or partial Germans, German ancestry. With an estimated size of approximately 43 million ...
, and philosopher
Hans Jonas Hans Jonas (; ; 10 May 1903 – 5 February 1993) was a Germany, German-born American Jewish philosopher, from 1955 to 1976 the Alvin Johnson Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York City. Biography Image:Mo ...
. In 1934, the University in Exile was chartered by
New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspaper in Col ...
and its name was changed to the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science. In 2005 the Graduate Faculty was again renamed, this time taking the original name of the university, The New School for Social Research.


École libre des hautes études

The New School played a similar role with the founding of the
École Libre des Hautes Études École may refer to: * an elementary school in the French educational stages normally followed by Secondary education in France, secondary education establishments (collège and lycée) * École (river), a tributary of the Seine flowing in région ...
after the Nazi invasion of France. Receiving a charter from
de Gaulle Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (; ; 22 November 18909 November 1970) was a French army officer and statesman who led Free France Free France and its Free French Forces (french: France Libre et les ) was the government-in-exile ...
's
Free French Free France (french: France Libre) was the government-in-exile A government in exile (abbreviated as GiE) is a political group which claims to be a country A country is a distinct territory, territorial body or political entity. It ...
government in exile, the École attracted refugee scholars who taught in French, including philosopher
Jacques Maritain Jacques Maritain (; 18 November 1882 – 28 April 1973) was a French Catholic The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from t ...

Jacques Maritain
, anthropologist
Claude Lévi-Strauss Claude Lévi-Strauss (, ; 28 November 1908 – 30 October 2009) was a French anthropologist An anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology Anthropology is the of ity, concerned with , , , and , in both the presen ...
, and linguist
Roman Jakobson Roman Osipovich Jakobson (russian: Рома́н О́сипович Якобсо́н; October 11, 1896Kucera, Henry. 1983. "Roman Jakobson." ''Language: Journal of the Linguistic Society of America'' 59(4): 871–883. – July 18,
. The ''École Libre'' gradually evolved into one of the leading institutions of research in Paris, the ''
École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales The School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (french: École des hautes études en sciences sociales; also known as EHESS) is one of the most selective and prestigious ''grandes écoles Grandes may refer to: *Agustín Muñoz Grandes, S ...
'', with which the New School maintains close ties.


Dramatic Workshop/School of Drama

Between 1940 and 1949, The New School included the "
Dramatic Workshop Dramatic Workshop was the name of a drama and acting school associated with the New School for Social Research The New School for Social Research (NSSR) is an educational institution that is part of The New School The New School is a private Pr ...
," a groundbreaking theater education program and predecessor of
School of Drama A drama school, stage school or theatre school is an undergraduate and/or graduate school or academic department, department at a college or university; or a free-standing institution (such as the Drama section at the Juilliard School); which sp ...
that was founded by German emigrant theatre director
Erwin Piscator Erwin Friedrich Maximilian Piscator (17 December 1893 – 30 March 1966) was a German theatre director A theatre director or stage director is a professional in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a theatre produc ...
. Important acting teachers during this period were
Stella Adler Stella or STELLA may refer to: Art, entertainment, and media Comedy *Stella (comedy group) Stella is a comedy trio consisting of Michael Showalter, Michael Ian Black, and David Wain. The group formed in 1997 as a weekly nightclub comedy attract ...
and
Elia Kazan Elia Kazan (; born Elias Kazantzoglou ( el, Ηλίας Καζαντζόγλου); September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was an American film and theatre director, producer, screenwriter and actor, described by ''The New York Times '' ...
. Among the famous students of the Dramatic Workshop were
Beatrice Arthur Beatrice Arthur (born Bernice Frankel; May 13, 1922 – April 25, 2009) was an American actress, comedian and activist. Arthur began her career on stage in 1947. She won the 1966 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for playin ...
,
Harry Belafonte Harry Belafonte (born Harold George Bellanfanti Jr., March 1, 1927) is an American singer, songwriter, activist, and actor. One of the most successful Jamaican-American pop stars, as he popularised the Trinbagonian Caribbean The Caribbean ( ...

Harry Belafonte
,
Marlon Brando Marlon Brando Jr. (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004) was an American actor with a career spanning 60 years, during which he won many accolades, including two Academy Awards for Best Actor, three BAFTA Awards for Best Foreign Actor and two Go ...
,
Tony Curtis Tony Curtis (born Bernard Schwartz; June 3, 1925September 29, 2010) was an American actor whose career spanned six decades, achieving the height of his popularity in the 1950s and early 1960s. He acted in more than 100 films in roles covering a ...

Tony Curtis
, Ben Gazzara, Michael V. Gazzo,
Rod Steiger Rodney Stephen Steiger (April 14, 1925July 9, 2002) was an American actor, known for his portrayal of offbeat, often volatile and crazed characters. Cited as "one of Hollywood's most charismatic and dynamic stars," he is closely associated with t ...

Rod Steiger
, Elaine Stritch, Shelley Winters and Tennessee Williams.


Organization

The New School is divided into autonomous colleges called "divisions". Each one is led by a dean and has its own scholarships, standards of admission, and acceptance rates.


Major Colleges


Former divisions


2005 rebranding

In June 2005, the university was rebranded with a new logo and all schools were officially renamed to include "The New School" within their formal names. Some faculty, students, and alumni expressed concern over the rebranding of the university, and especially the dramatic redesign of the logo from a six-sided shield against a green background to a spray-painted graffiti mark reading simply, in capital letters, "THE NEW SCHOOL" with, in smaller letters beneath, "A UNIVERSITY". They claimed that the university's new identity campaign, while maintaining a slick urban edge, did little to suggest academic rigor or collegiate legacy.''Business Week''
" A Bad Move on a New Logo"
Retrieved April 17, 2007.


2015 rebranding

In 2015 the New School rebranded using elements designed by Paula Scher of Pentagram (design studio), Pentagram using a bespoke font called "Neue". In addition to the new logo, the school announced that it was combining Mannes College of Music, New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, and New School for Drama into a College of Performing Arts in fall 2015, relocating most of the performing arts to Arnhold Hall at 55 West 13th St., where the School of Jazz had occupied two floors since the early 90s.


Academics

Unlike most U.S. universities, The New School's Lang College has a "student-directed curriculum," which does not require its undergraduates to take general education courses. Instead, students are encouraged to explore before focusing on a major, selecting topics that are of interest to them. An exception to this is in the performing arts, where students must declare majors at enrollment. Although all "New Schoolers" are required to complete rigorous core training—usually of a literary, conservatory, or artistic nature—students are expected to be the primary designers of their own curriculum. The university offers 81 degree/diploma programs and majors, with a student:faculty ratio of 9:1. Small class sizes allow The New School to teach most of its classes seminar style—especially at Eugene Lang College, which consistently ranks at the top of The Princeton Review's "class discussions encouraged" national listing.


Dual degree programs

The university offers a range of dual degree programs. These include a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts (colloquially called the "BA/FA pathway") program or a Bachelor of Arts and Master's degree, master's program. The former is a comprehensive five-year program that allows students to obtain their B.A. from Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, Eugene Lang College and their B.F.A. from either Parsons School of Design, Parsons or The School of Jazz and Contemporary Music. The latter is also a five-year program that allows students at Eugene Lang to obtain their masters from the New School For Social Research. The university also offers a Master of Arts Management and Entrepreneurship program, which can be obtained along with either a Bachelor of Music (Mannes) or a Bachelor of Fine Arts (drama or jazz) in five-years.


Institutes and research centers

Various institutes and research centers at The New School focus on specific fields of study: * International affairs and global perspectives * Philosophy and intellectual culture * Humanities Action Lab * Politics, policy, and society * Art, design, and theory * Environment * Urban and community development * Center for New York City Affairs * Center for Public Scholarship The New School's College of Performing Arts is home to the influential experimental music venue, The Stone, offering 240 concerts a year.


Enrollment demographics

Thirty-three percent of New School students are international, with 112 foreign countries being represented at the university. U.S. students come from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Forty-three percent of them are people of color, and 5% of American students identify as more than one race. Of the entire student population, 63% receive financial aid, and 17% study abroad before graduating.


Campus

The New School's campus is composed of many buildings, most of which are minutes from Union Square (New York City), Union Square. The university's Parsons division also has affiliations with schools that operate independently but embrace Parsons' philosophy and teaching methodology, including Parsons Paris (2013), Parsons Paris in France, India School of Design and Innovation in Mumbai, and La Escuela de Diseño at Altos de Chavón in La Romana, Dominican Republic. ;The New School campus


University Center

The New School opened the 16-story The New School University Center, University Center ("UC") at 65 5th Avenue in January 2014. While the 65 Fifth Avenue plans were initially controversial among students and Village residents (spurring in 2009 a major student occupation that was held at The New School's previous building on that site), plans for the University Center were adjusted in response to community concerns and have since been well received. In a review of the University Center's final design, ''
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
'' architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff called the building "a celebration of the cosmopolitan city". The UC serves as a central hub for all university students. The tower, which was designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill's Roger Duffy, is the biggest capital project the university has ever undertaken. The building added classrooms, new residences, computer labs, event facilities, and a cafeteria to the downtown New York City campus in addition to a library, and lecture hall.


Historical significance

Several of the university buildings are New York City designated landmarks. Among these is the egg-shaped Tishman Auditorium, an interior landmark. It was designed by architect Joseph Urban, along with the entirety of The New School's 66 West 12th Street building, the last major project Urban designed. Thousands of writer's forums, author visits, political debates, award ceremonies, academic lectures, performances, and public hearings are held for both the academic community and general public throughout the year in Tishman. Newer buildings have garnered a multitude of awards. Among these is The Sheila Johnson Design Center, which attracted media attention for its revolutionary design. In 2009, it won the SCUP's Excellence in Architecture Renovation/Adaptive Reuse Award. In addition to being a Parsons core academic building, the Center also serves as a public art gallery. The New School Welcome Center, located on 13th Street and Fifth Avenue, won the American Institute of Architects, New York Chapter's Interiors Merit Award in 2010. In October 2019, the university celebrated its centennial with ''The Festival of New.''


Libraries

The New School owns several libraries throughout New York City and is a member of the Research Library Association of South Manhattan. In 2009, its libraries counted a total of 1,906,046 holdings. * Fogelman Social Sciences and Humanities Library, Fogelman Social Sciences and Humanitie''s Library'' ''(migrated to the List Center)'' *''Kellen Archives – design and Parsons' history (migrated to Archives & Special Collections)'' *''Visual Resource Center (no longer active)'' *''Adam and Sophie Gimbel Design Library (migrated to University Center Library in 2013)'' * Alexis Gregory Library for the Performing Arts * Archives & Special Collections * University Center Library – art and design * List Center Library – humanities and social sciences


Art collection

In 1931 the New School commissioned two mural cycles: José Clemente Orozco's "A Call for Revolution" and "Universal Brotherhood" and Thomas Hart Benton's epic America Today. The New School Art Collection was established in 1960 with a grant from the Albert A. List Foundation. The collection, now grown to approximately 1,800 postwar and contemporary works of art, includes examples in almost all media. Parts of it are exhibited throughout the campus. Notable artists such as Andy Warhol, Kara Walker, Richard Serra, and Sol LeWitt all have pieces displayed in New School's academic buildings.


Publications


Academic journals

The New School publishes the following journals: * ''Constellations (journal), Constellations'' * ''Social Research'' * ''The Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal'' * ''International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society'' * ''New School Economic Review'' * ''New School Psychology Bulletin'' * ''The Journal of Design Strategies'' * ''The Parsons Journal for Information Mapping (PJIM)'', a quarterly publication by the Parsons Institute for Information Mapping


Other university publications

* ''The New School Free Press'', The New School's only student-run newspaper, with a monthly print edition distributed around campus and continually updated online content * '' Public Seminar,'' an independent project of The New School Publishing Initiative, produced by The New School faculty, students and staff and supported by colleagues and collaborators around the globe''.'' * ''LIT'', a nationally distributed literary journal – contains works selected by the MFA Creative Writing Program * ''12th Street'', a nationally distributed literary journal from The New School's Riggio Honor Program that contains work from undergraduate writers at the university * ''Voices'', the literary journal of New School's The Institute For Retired Professionals * ''Eleven and a Half'', the literary journal of Eugene Lang College * ''NEW_S'', an e-newsroom showcasing The New School in major media, major student and alumni achievements, university programs, and other news * ''Canon Magazine'', a quarterly publication of student writings published by The New School for Social Research * ''re:D'', the magazine for Parsons alumni and the wider Parsons community, published by the New School Alumni Association. * ''Scapes'', the annual journal of the School of Constructed Environments * ''BIAS: Journal of Dress Practice'', a journal published by the MA Fashion Studies Dress Practice Collective started in the spring of 2013 that aims to join elements of "visual culture, fashion theory, design studies and personal practice through a variety of media". * ''The Weekly Observer'', an online newsletter showcasing major student and alumni achievements, special program announcements, and other university-wide news. Distributed via MyNewSchool web portal


Student life


Student organizations

The New School houses over 50 recognized student organizations, most of which are geared towards artistic endeavors or civic engagement. Notable among these are The Theatre Collective, which stages numerous dramatic productions throughout the year, Narwhals on Broadway, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the New School Debate Team (intercollegiate competition in Policy/Cross Examination style debate), ReNew School (sustainability and environmental advocacy group) Moxie (feminist alliance), the New Urban Grilling Society (NUGS), and The Radical Student Union (RSU).


Student-run media

;Print A noted student newspaper, ''The New School Free Press'', also known as ''NSFP'' is widely distributed throughout the campus. Hard print copies are available in most academic buildings, while an online edition is available as well. Students at Eugene Lang College publishes ''Release'', a student-run literary magazine. ;CoPA Radio The online radio station spans a wide range of genres, and features more than 400 artists, 500 albums, and 3,840 individual tracks and songs, all by students, faculty, alumni, and staff from throughout CoPA including the School of Drama, School of Jazz and Contemporary Music, and Mannes School of Music, as well as alumni from the wider New School community ;WNSR radio WNSR, a student-run, faculty-advised online-only radio station, also operates at the university. It is a station for all divisions of The New School.


Athletics and recreation

Former Athletics and Recreation Director Diane Yee joined The New School in August 2012. On October 25, 2012 a school-wide election was held to select a mascot, where The New School Narwhals were born. On January 25, 2013 the athletics logo was launched, designed by Parsons’ student Matthew Wolff (Graphic Design '14). The department began in December 2008 under its original name Recreation and Intramural sports. The initial director, Michael McQuarrie, held the position for four years. He built a relationship with the McBurney YMCA where intramurals continue to be held on Wednesday nights and created the ongoing New School Olympics and charitable 5K Turkey Trot. The Narwhals feature several intercollegiate teams: basketball (2009), cross country (2010), cycling (2013), soccer (2013), tennis (2014), ultimate Frisbee (2014). The New School Narwhals are an independent school, unaffiliated with the NCAA, but regularly compete against NCAA Division III schools. Basketball – competes regularly against Cooper Union, Culinary Institute of America, Pratt Institute, and Vaughn College Cross Country – competes in CUNYAC and HVIAC conference invitationals as an unaffiliated school Cycling – a member of the Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference Soccer – competes against Cooper Union, Culinary Institute of America, St. Joseph's College, and Vaughn College In addition to sports, the recreation department offers a myriad of free fitness classes to its community including boxing, dance, High-intensity interval training, HIIT, Pilates, tai chi, yoga, and Zumba. Personal training is also offered at an affordable rate ranging from $16.50 to $40 per session. Outdoor Adventure trips are offered several times/week and what started to be wilderness in nature (camping, hiking, rafting) has expanded to include excursions such as archery, biking, horseback riding, skiing/snowboarding, surfing, rock climbing and trapeze. Yee has increased programming to include a second charitable race that takes place annually in April called the 5K Rabbit Run. She has also started the Urban Hunt (a scavenger hunt around campus and the Village) and Club New (a dance party for first-year students the weekend before first day of classes).


Activist culture and social change

Historically, The New School has been associated with leftist politics, campus activism, civic engagement, and social change. It is a "Periclean University", or member Project Pericles, meaning that it teaches "education for social responsibility and participatory citizenship as an essential part of their educational programs, in the classroom, on the campus, and in the community". The New School is one of nine American universities to be inducted into Ashoka's "Changemaker" consortium for social entrepreneurship. In 2010, NYC Service awarded New School special recognition in The College Challenge, a volunteer initiative, for the "widest array of [civic] service events both on and off campus". Miriam Weinstein also cites the Eugene Lang division in her book, ''Making a Difference Colleges: Distinctive Colleges to Make a Better World''.


Kerrey presidency and opposition

Former United States Senate, U.S. Senator Bob Kerrey became president of The New School in 2000. Kerrey drew praise and criticism for his streamlining of the university, as well as censure for his support of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, generally opposed by the university's faculty. In 2004, Kerrey appointed Arjun Appadurai as Provost (education), provost. Appadurai resigned as provost in early 2006, but retained a tenured faculty position. He was succeeded by Joseph W. Westphal, yet on December 8, 2008 Kerrey announced that Westphal was stepping down to accept a position in President Barack Obama's United States Department of Defense, Department of Defense transition team. Kerrey then took the highly unorthodox step of appointing himself to the provost position while remaining president. This decision was strongly criticised by faculty and other members of the university community as a power-grab involving potential conflicts of interest. This was seen as a threat to scholarly integrity since the role of provost in overseeing the academic functions of a university has traditionally been insulated from fundraising and other responsibilities of a college president. After a series of rifts including protests involving student occupations of university buildings, Kerrey later appointed Tim Marshall, Dean of
Parsons School of Design Parsons School of Design, known colloquially as Parsons, is a Private school, private art and design college located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is one of the five colleges of The New School. Th ...
, as Interim Provost through June 2011. Marshall has since been reappointed in this role. On December 10, 2008, 74 of the New School's senior professors gave a vote of no confidence for the New School's former president, Bob Kerrey. By December 15, 98% of the university's full-time faculty had voted no confidence. On December 17, over 100 students Occupation (protest), barricaded themselves in at a dining hall on the campus while hundreds more waited on the streets outside. They considered the current school administration opaque and harmful. Their chief demand, among others, was that Bob Kerrey resign. The students soon enlarged their occupied area, blocking security and police from entering the building. At 3 AM the next morning, the students left the building after Kerrey agreed to some of their demands (the most important elements on their first list of demands were not agreed to), including increased study space and amnesty from any actions performed during the protest. He did not, however, concede to resignation. In total, the occupation lasted 30 hours. The following year, on April 10, 2009, students, mostly from New School but also from other New York colleges, reoccupied the building at 65 Fifth Avenue, this time holding the entire building for about six hours. Once again, the students demanded the resignation of Bob Kerrey. The New York Police Department arrested the occupiers; the New School students involved were then suspended. The next month, Kerrey announced he would fulfill his presidency at the university through the end of his term and expressed his intent to leave office in June 2011. However, he ended up resigning a semester early, on January 1, 2011. In August, the board of trustees appointed David E. Van Zandt, Dr. David E. Van Zandt the university's president.


Environmental sustainability

In 2010, The Princeton Review gives the university a sustainability rating of 94 out of 99. In 2010, the organization also named The New School one of America's "286 Green Colleges". The New School has a student-led environment and sustainability group, called Renew School, as well as full-time employees devoted to the school's sustainability. The university signed the Presidents' Climate Commitment and PlaNYC. The institution's sustainability website outlines many goals and projects for the future which will hopefully help The New School receive a good rating in the 2010 College Sustainability Report Card. The New School had the lowest reported carbon footprint of any college and university submitting inventories under the Green Report Card program, totaling about 1.0 metric tons CO2 per student. Subsequently, with the completion of the LEED certified but large University Center, The New School's carbon footprint increased to about 1.5 metric tons.


Labor movement

Academic student workers are represented by SENS-UAW, clerical employees and librarians are represented by Teamsters Local 1205, professional employees are represented by Teamsters Local 1205 Professional, student health employees are represented by SHENS-UAW Local 7902, maintenance workers and security are represented by SEIU 32BJ, engineers are represented by IUOE Local 94, part-time faculty is represented by ACT-UAW Local 7902, and part-time jazz faculty is represented by AFM Local 802. In 2003, Professor, adjunct faculty in several divisions of the New School began to form a labor union chapter under the auspices of the United Auto Workers. Though the university at first tried to contest the unionization, after several rulings against it by regional and national panels of the National Labor Relations Board the university recognized the local chapter, ACT-UAW, as the bargaining agent for the faculty. As a result of a near strike in November 2005 on the part of the adjunct faculty, the ACT-UAW union negotiated its first contract which included the acknowledgment of previously unrecognized part-time faculty at Mannes College of Music, Mannes College The New School for Music, the only division of The New School where a majority of the faculty did not vote to support unionization. In October 2018, graduate students received a tentative union contract from the administration after months of negotiations.


Notable people

According to the university, The New School has a living alumni pool of over 56,000 and graduates live in 112 different countries.


Notable alumni

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Musician
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Novelist and poet
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Actress File:Elaine Stritch.jpg, Elaine Stritch
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Artist


Notable faculty

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Modern dancer and choreographer File:Aaron Copland 1970.JPG, Aaron Copland
Composer and conductor File:Hannah Arendt 1975 (cropped).jpg,
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Painter


See also

* Education in New York City * National Book Award * The New York Foundation * The New York Intellectuals * Project Pericles * Free University of New York


References


Further reading

* Magg, P. "Education for the Age of Labor", ''The Kenyon Review,'' vol. 6, no. 4 (Autumn 1944), pp. 632–644. * Rutkoff, Peter M. and Scott, William B. ''New School: A History of the New School for Social Research''. New York: Free Press, 1986.


External links

*
WNSR New School Radio
{{DEFAULTSORT:New School, The The New School, Universities and colleges in New York City Greenwich Village Private universities and colleges in New York City, The New School Educational institutions established in 1919 1919 establishments in New York City Universities and colleges in Manhattan University art museums and galleries in New York City