HOME

TheInfoList




''The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling'', often known simply as ''Tom Jones'', is a comic novel by English playwright and novelist
Henry Fielding Henry Fielding (22 April 1707 – 8 October 1754) was an English novelist, ironist and dramatist known for earthy humour and satire. His comic novel ''The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Tom Jones'' is still widely appreciated. He and Samuel ...

Henry Fielding
. It is a ''
Bildungsroman In literary criticism Literary criticism (or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical analysis, philosophical d ...
'' and a
picaresque novel The picaresque novel (Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigenous to Spain **Spanish language **Spanish cuisine Other places * Spanish, Ontario, Canada * Spanish River (dis ...
. It was first published on 28 February 1749 in London and is among the earliest English works to be classified as a novel. It is the earliest novel mentioned by W. Somerset Maugham in his 1948 book '' Great Novelists and Their Novels'' among the ten best novels of the world. The novel is highly organised despite its length.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge Samuel Taylor Coleridge (; 21 October 177225 July 1834) was an , , and who, with his friend , was a founder of the in England and a member of the . He also shared volumes and collaborated with , , and . He wrote the poems ' and ', as well ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
argued that it has one of the "three most perfect plots ever planned", alongside ''
Oedipus Tyrannus ''Oedipus Rex'', also known by its Greek title, ''Oedipus Tyrannus'' ( grc, Οἰδίπους Τύραννος, ), or ''Oedipus the King'', is an Classical Athens, Athenian tragedy by Sophocles that was first performed around 429 BC. Originally, ...
'' and '' The Alchemist''. It became a best seller with four editions published in its first year alone. It is generally regarded as Fielding's greatest book and as an influential English novel.


Plot

The novel's events occupy eighteen books. The book opens with the narrator stating that the purpose of the novel will be to explore "human nature". The kindly and wealthy Squire Allworthy and his sister Bridget are introduced in their wealthy estate in
Somerset ( en, All The People of Somerset) , locator_map = , coordinates = , region = South West England South West England is one of nine official regions of England The regions, formerly known as the government office regions, are the ...

Somerset
. Allworthy returns from London after an extended business trip and finds an abandoned baby sleeping in his bed. He summons his housekeeper, Mrs Deborah Wilkins, to take care of the child. After searching the nearby village Mrs Wilkins is told about a young woman called Jenny Jones, a servant of a schoolmaster and his wife, as the most likely person to have committed the deed. Jenny is brought before the Allworthys and admits being put that baby in the bed, but she refuses to reveal the father's identity. Mr Allworthy mercifully removes Jenny to a place where her reputation will be unknown and tells his sister to raise the boy, whom he names Thomas, in his household. Two brothers, Dr Blifil and Captain Blifil, regularly visit the Allworthy estate. The doctor introduces the captain to Bridget in the hope of marrying into Allworthy's wealth. The couple soon marries. After the marriage, Captain Blifil begins to show a coldness to his brother, who eventually feels obliged to leave the house for London. He does, and, soon after, he dies "of a broken heart". Captain Blifil and his wife start to grow cool towards one another, and the former is found dead from
apoplexy Apoplexy () is bleeding Bleeding, also known as a hemorrhage, haemorrhage, or simply blood loss, is blood Blood is a body fluid Body fluids, bodily fluids, or biofluids are liquid A liquid is a nearly incompressible fluid In phy ...
one evening after taking his customary evening stroll before dinner. By then, he has fathered a boy who grows up with the bastard Tom. Captain Blifil's son, known as Master Blifil, is a miserable and jealous boy who conspires against Tom. Tom grows into a vigorous and lusty yet honest and kind-hearted youth. He tends to be closer friends with the servants and gamekeepers than with members of the gentry. He is close friends with Black George, who is the gamekeeper. His first love is Molly, Black George's second daughter and a local beauty. She throws herself at Tom, who gets her pregnant and then feels obliged to offer her his protection. After some time, however, Tom finds out that Molly is somewhat promiscuous. He then falls in love with a neighbouring squire's lovely daughter, Sophia Western. Tom and Sophia confess their love for each other after Tom breaks his arm rescuing Sophia. Tom's status as a bastard causes Sophia's father and Allworthy to disapprove their love. This class friction gives Fielding an opportunity for biting
social commentary Social commentary is the act of using rhetoric Rhetoric () is the Art (skill), art of persuasion, which along with grammar and logic (or dialectic – see Martianus Capella), is one of the Trivium, three ancient arts of discourse. Rh ...
. The inclusion of prostitution and sexual promiscuity in the plot was also novel for its time, and it was the foundation for criticism of the book's "lowness". Squire Allworthy falls ill and is convinced that he is dying. His family and servants gather around his bed as he disposes his wealth. He gives a favourable amount of his wealth to Tom Jones, which displeases Master Blifil. Tom doesn't care about what he has been given, since his only concern is Allworthy's health. Allworthy's health improves, and we learn that he will live. At the same time, Mrs. Bridget Allworthy dies in London. Tom Jones is so excited that he begins to get drunk and gets into a fight with Master Blifil. Sophia wants to conceal her love for Tom, so she gives a majority of her attention to Blifil when the three of them are together. This leads to Sophia's aunt, Mrs Western, believing that Sophia and Blifil are in love. Squire Western wants Sophia to marry Blifil in order to gain property from the Allworthy estate. Blifil learns of Sophia's true affection for Tom Jones and is angry. Blifil tells Allworthy that, on the day he almost died, Tom was out drinking and singing and celebrating his coming death. This leads Tom to be banished. Tom's banishment seems to ensure that Sophia will be forced to marry Blifil, whom she finds odious, so she flees to avoid that fate. After Tom is expelled from Allworthy's estate he begins his adventures across Britain, eventually ending up in
London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller lowerc ...

London
. On the way, he meets a barber, Partridge, who was banished from town because he was thought to be Tom's father. He becomes Tom's faithful companion in the hope of restoring his reputation. During their journey, they end up at an inn. While they are there, a lady and her maid arrive. An angry man arrives, and the chambermaid points him in the direction she thinks he needs to go. He bursts in on Tom and Mrs Waters, a woman whom Tom rescued, in bed together. The man, however, was looking for Mrs Fitzpatrick and leaves. Sophia and her maid arrive at the same inn, and Partridge unknowingly reveals the relationship between Tom and Mrs Waters. Sophia leaves with Mrs Fitzpatrick, who is her cousin, and heads for London. They arrive at the home of Lady Bellaston, followed by Tom and Partridge. Eventually, Tom tells Sophia that his true love is for her and no one else. Tom ends up getting into a duel with Mr Fitzpatrick, which leads to his imprisonment. Eventually, the secret of Tom's birth is revealed after a brief scare involving Mrs Waters. Mrs Waters is really Jenny Jones, Tom's supposed mother, and Tom fears that he has committed
incest Incest ( ) is between family members or close . This typically includes sexual activity between people in (blood relations), and sometimes those related by ( or ), adoption, or . The is one of the most widespread of all cultural s, both in ...
. This, however, is not the case, as Tom's mother is in fact Bridget Allworthy, who conceived him after an affair with a schoolmaster. Tom is thus Squire Allworthy's nephew. After finding out about the intrigues of Blifil, who is Tom's half-brother, Allworthy decides to bestow most of his inheritance on Tom. After Tom's true parentage is revealed, he and Sophia marry, as Squire Western no longer harbours any misgivings about Tom marrying his daughter. Sophia bears Tom a son and a daughter, and the couple live on happily with the blessings of Squire Western and Squire Allworthy.


Style

The highly visible narrator is a central feature of ''Tom Jones''. Each book begins with a prefatory chapter directly addressing the reader, and the narrator provides a continuous commentary on characters and events. According to Wayne C. Booth, the reader's relationship with the narrator is something like a subplot. The reader becomes more attached to the narrator over the course of the book, culminating in a heartfelt farewell. Fielding presents a panorama of contemporary British life, drawing characters from many different classes and occupations. But
Ian Watt Ian Watt (9 March 1917 – 13 December 1999) was a literary critic, literary historian and professor of English at Stanford University. His ''The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding'' (1957) is an important work in the hi ...
argues in ''The Rise of the Novel'' that Fielding did not aim at the "realism of presentation" of lifelike detail and psychology practiced by authors such as
Richardson Richardson may refer to: People * Richardson (surname), an English and Scottish surname * Richardson Dilworth, Mayor of Philadelphia (1956-1962) Places Australia *Richardson, Australian Capital Territory Canada *Richardson Islands, Nunavut *R ...

Richardson
. Watt claims that Fielding was more focused on the "realism of assessment", the way in which the novel engages a broad range of topics with intelligence and "a wise assessment of life".


Themes

The main theme of the novel is the contrast between Tom Jones's good nature, flawed but eventually corrected by his love for
virtuous Virtue ( la, virtus) is a morality, moral excellence. A virtue is a trait or quality that is deemed to be morally good and thus is Value (ethics), valued as a foundation of principle and good moral being. Personal virtues are characteristics Va ...

virtuous
Sophia Western, and his half-brother Blifil's
hypocrisy Hypocrisy is the practice of engaging in the same behavior or activity for which one criticizes another or the practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one's own behavior does not conform. In moral psychologyMoral psycho ...
. Secondary themes include several other examples of virtue (especially that of Squire Allworthy), hypocrisy (especially that of Thwackum) and
villain A villain (also known as a "black hat Black hat, blackhats, or black-hat refers to: Arts, entertainment, and media * Black hat (computer security), a hacker who violates computer security for little reason beyond maliciousness or for person ...
y (for example, that of Mrs Western and Ensign Northerton), sometimes tempered by repentance (for instance Square and Mrs Waters ''née'' Jones). Both introductory chapters to each book and interspersed commentary introduce a long line of further themes. For instance, introductory chapters dwell extensively on bad writers and critics, quite unrelated to the plot but apologetic to the author and the novel itself; and authorial commentary on several characters shows strong opposition to
Methodism Methodism, also called the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations Denomination may refer to: * Religious denomination, such as a: ** Christian denomination ** Jewish denomination ** Islamic denomination ** Hindu d ...
, calling it
fanatical Fanaticism (from the Latin adverb ''fānāticē'' ren-''fānāticus''; enthusiastic, ecstatic; raging, fanatical, furious is a belief or behavior involving uncritical zeal (disambiguation), zeal or an obsessive enthusiasm. Philosopher George ...
and
heretical Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. The term is usually used in reference to violations of important religi ...
, and implying an association between Methodism and hypocrites such as the younger Blifil. The novel takes place against the backdrop of the
Jacobite rising of 1745 The Jacobite rising of 1745, also known as the Forty-five Rebellion or simply the '45 ( gd, Bliadhna Theàrlaich, , ), was an attempt by Charles Edward Stuart Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart (20 Decembe ...
. Characters take different sides over the rebellion, which was an attempt to restore
Roman Catholicism The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian r ...

Roman Catholicism
as the
established religion A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a religious Religion is a social system, social-cultural system of designated religious behaviour, behaviors and practices, morality, morals, beliefs, worldviews ...
of England and to undo the
Glorious Revolution The Glorious Revolution of November 1688 ( ga, An Réabhlóid Ghlórmhar; gd, Rèabhlaid Ghlòrmhor; cy, Chwyldro Gogoneddus), the invasion also known as the ''Glorieuze Overtocht'' or Glorious Crossing by the Dutch, was the deposition of ...
. At one point Sophia Western is even mistaken for Jenny Cameron, the supposed lover of
Bonnie Prince Charlie Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart (20 December 1720 – 30 January 1788) was the elder son of James Francis Edward Stuart James Francis Edward Stuart (10 June 16881 January 1766), nicknamed the ...

Bonnie Prince Charlie
. Good-natured characters are often moderately
loyalist Loyalism, in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdo ...
and
Anglican Anglicanism is a Western Christianity, Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation. Adherents of Anglicanism are called ''Anglicans''; t ...
, or even supporters of the
House of Hanover The House of Hanover (german: Haus von Hannover), whose members are known as Hanoverians, is a German German(s) may refer to: Common uses * of or related to Germany * Germans, Germanic ethnic group, citizens of Germany or people of German ...
, while ill-natured characters (Mrs Western) or mistaken ones (Partridge) can be
Jacobites Jacobite may refer to: Religion * Jacobites, Jacob Baradaeus (died 578). Churches in the Jacobite tradition and sometimes called Jacobite include: ** Jacobite Syrian Christian Church, autonomous branch of the Syriac Orthodox Church in Kerala, Ind ...
, or (like Squire Western) anti-Hanoverian.


List of characters

* Master Thomas "Tom" Jones, a bastard and Squire Allworthy's ward * Miss Sophia "Sophy" Western , Western's only daughter, the model of virtue, beauty and all good qualities * Master William Blifil , the son of Captain Blifil and Bridget; a hypocrite and Tom Jones's rival * Squire Allworthy, the wealthy squire of an estate in Somerset and Tom's guardian; of irreproachable character and good nature * Squire Western, a wealthy squire and huntsman who owns an estate bordering on Squire Allworthy's; a simpleton who wants to marry his daughter Sophia to Allworthy's heir (first Blifil and then Jones) * Miss Bridget Allworthy (later Mrs Blifil), Allworthy's sister * Lady Bellaston, Tom's lover and a leading figure in London society, who tries to force Sophia into marriage to a lord by having her raped by him, so that she can have Jones to herself * Mrs Honour Blackmore, Sophia's maid; egotistical and inconstant to her employer * Dr Blifil, Captain Blifil's brother; dies of a broken heart at his brother's rejection * Captain John Blifil, a captain in the army and Bridget Allworthy's husband; with Methodist tendencies * Lawyer Dowling, a lawyer * Lord Fellamar, a peer and socialite; unsuccessfully conspires with Lady Bellaston to rape Sophia so as to force her into marriage * Brian Fitzpatrick, an Irishman who abuses his wife, Harriet Fitzpatrick * Harriet Fitzpatrick, Mrs Western's former ward and Fitzpatrick's wife; a cousin and friend of Sophia, but lacking her virtue * Miss Jenny Jones (later Mrs Waters), the Partridges' servant, a very intelligent woman who is believed to be Tom's mother * Mrs Miller, mother of Nancy and Betty Miller * Miss Betty Miller, pre-adolescent daughter of Mrs Miller * Miss Nancy Miller (later Nightingale), a good-natured girl who is imposed on by Mr Nightingale and is ruined by him, together with her family, by lack of constancy in virtue * Mr Nightingale, a young gentleman of leisure; saved from ruining his first true love by Jones's entreaties * Mr Benjamin "Little Benjamin" Partridge, a teacher, barber, and surgeon, suspected to be Tom Jones's father * Mrs Partridge, Partridge's extremely ill-natured first wife * Mr George "Black George" Seagrim, Allworthy and later Western's gamekeeper; a poor man and the object of Tom's charity * Miss Molly "Moll" Seagrim, Black George's second daughter and Tom Jones's first lover; has a bastard son, possibly not by Tom * Mr Thomas Square, a humanist philosopher and tutor to Tom and Master Blifil; a hypocrite who hates Jones and favors Blifil, but eventually repents * The Rev. Mr Roger Thwackum, tutor to Tom and Master Blifil, a hypocrite who hates Tom Jones, favors Master Blifil and conspires with the latter against the former * Miss Western, Squire Western's unmarried sister, who wrongly believes herself to "know the World" (both international and national politics and social mores) * Mrs Deborah Wilkins, Bridget's servant


Adaptations and influences

The book was made into the 1963 film '' Tom Jones'' written by
John Osborne John James Osborne (12 December 1929 – 24 December 1994) was an English playwright A playwright or dramatist is a person who writes play Play most commonly refers to: * Play (activity), an activity done for enjoyment * Play (theatre), a w ...

John Osborne
, directed by
Tony Richardson Cecil Antonio "Tony" Richardson (5 June 1928 – 14 November 1991) was an English theatre and film director and producer whose career spanned five decades. In 1964 he won the Academy Award for Best Director for the film ''Tom Jones (1963 film) ...
, and starring
Albert Finney Albert Finney (9 May 1936 – 7 February 2019) was an English actor. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and worked in the theatre before attaining prominence on screen in the early 1960s, debuting with ''The Entertainer (film), T ...
as Tom. In 1964, a studio cast recording of a musical adaptation produced by Theatre Productions Records featured Clive Revill (as the narrator), Bob Roman (Tom), Karen Morrow (Mrs. Waters); music by Bob Roberts, lyrics by Ruth Batchelor, arranged and conducted by ''
Peter Matz Peter Matz (November 6, 1928 – August 9, 2002) was an American musician, composer, arranger and conductor. His musical career in film, theater, television and studio recording spanned fifty years, and he worked with a number of prominent ...
''). It inspired the 1976 film ''
The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones ''The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones'' is a 1976 British British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people The British people, or Britons, are the citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Irel ...
''. It has also been the basis of operas by François-André Philidor ( ''Tom Jones'', 1765); by
Edward German Sir Edward German (17 February 1862 – 11 November 1936) was an English musician and composer of Welsh descent, best remembered for his extensive output of incidental music for the stage and as a successor to Arthur Sullivan in the field of En ...

Edward German
( ''Tom Jones'', 1907); and by Stephen Oliver in 1975. A BBC
adaptation In , adaptation has three related meanings. Firstly, it is the dynamic evolutionary process that fits s to their environment, enhancing their . Secondly, it is a state reached by the population during that process. Thirdly, it is a or adapti ...
dramatised by Simon Burke was broadcast in 1997 with
Max Beesley Maxton Gig Beesley Jr. (born 16 April 1971) is an English actor and musician. He has appeared in a variety of television shows such as ''Bodies (TV series), Bodies'', ''The History of Tom Jones: a Foundling (TV series), The History of Tom Jone ...
in the title role. The book has also been adapted for the stage by Joan Macalpine. In 2014,
Jon Jory Jon Jory is a theatrical director instrumental in the development of Actors Theatre of Louisville; he is also widely rumored to be the writer behind the pseudonym Jane Martin. Childhood Jory is a child of cinema of the United States, Hollywood char ...
adapted the novel for the stage. In 2020, it was announced that the book will also be adapted into a jukebox musical called ''What's New Pussycat?'' featuring songs by the singer Tom Jones setting the story in the 1960s. A TV miniseries will star Solly McLeod and Sophie Wilde in mid-2022.


See also

*
Illegitimacy in fiction This is a list of fictional stories in which illegitimacy features as an important plot (narrative), plot element. Passing mentions are omitted from this article. Many of these stories explore the social pain and exclusion felt by illegitimate "na ...


Bibliography


Editions

* Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (London:
Andrew Millar Andrew Millar (17058 June 1768) was a Scottish publisher in the eighteenth century. Biography In 1725, as a twenty-year-old bookseller apprentice, he evaded Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital cit ...
, 1749). The first edition. * Fielding, Henry "Tom Jones" (New York: The Modern Library, 1931). First Modern Library Edition. * Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (Wesleyan University Press, 1975) . Edited by Martin Battestin and Fredson C. Bowers. Widely taken to be the authoritative version. * Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (New York: W. W. Norton, 1995) . Edited with notes by Sheridan Baker. This edition includes a collection of critical essays; it is based on the fourth and final edition of the novel, though it also includes the version of The Man of the Hill episode found in the 3rd edition in an appendix. * Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (London: Everyman's Library, 1998) . Edited with an introduction and notes by Douglas Brooks-Davies. * Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2005) . Edited with an introduction and notes by Tom Keymer and Alice Wakely. * Fielding, Henry ''Tom Jones'' (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985). Edited with an introduction and notes by Reginald P. C. Mutter.


Critical collections

* Compton, Neil (ed.) ''Henry Fielding: Tom Jones, A Casebook'' (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1987) . Includes essays by
William Empson Sir William Empson (27 September 1906 – 15 April 1984) was an English literary critic Literary criticism (or literary studies) is the study, evaluation Evaluation is a system A system is a group of Interaction, interacting or in ...

William Empson
,
Ian Watt Ian Watt (9 March 1917 – 13 December 1999) was a literary critic, literary historian and professor of English at Stanford University. His ''The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding'' (1957) is an important work in the hi ...
, and Claude Rawson, amongst others. ;Monographs * Battestin, Martin C. ''The Providence of Wit'' (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970) . Includes a chapter on ''Tom Jones''. * Ewers, Chris. ''Mobility in the English Novel from Defoe to Austen'' (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2018) . Includes a chapter on ''Tom Jones''. * Power, Henry. ''Epic into Novel'' (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015) . Includes two chapters on ''Tom Jones''. * Rogers, Pat ''The Augustan Vision'' (London: Methuen, 1978) . Includes a chapter on Fielding, which treats ''Tom Jones'' briefly. * Watt, Ian ''The Rise of the Novel'' (London: Pimlico, 2000) . Includes a chapter on ''Tom Jones'', preceded by one titled 'Fielding and the epic theory of the novel'.


References


Sources

* . * . * Battestin, Martin. ''The Providence of Wit: Aspects of Form in Augustan Literature and the Arts''. Oxford: Clarendon, 1974. * Hunter, J. Paul. ''Before Novels: The Cultural Context of Eighteenth-Century English Fiction''. New York: WW Norton and Co., 1990. * McKeon, Michael. ''The Origins of the English Novel, 1600–1740''. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987. * Paulson, Ronald. ''Satire and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century''. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967. * Richetti, John. "Representing an Under Class: Servants and Proletarians in Fielding and Smollett." ''The New Eighteenth Century: Theory, Politics, English Literature''. Eds.
Felicity Nussbaum Felicity A. Nussbaum (born 1944) is Distinguished Research Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include 18th-century literature and culture, critical theory, gender studies and postcolonial and ...
and Laura Brown. London: Routledge, 1987. * Richetti, John.
The Old Order and the New Novel of the Mid-Eighteenth Century: Narrative Authority in Fielding and Smollett.
''Eighteenth-Century Fiction'' 2 (1990): 99–126. * Smallwood, Angela J. ''Fielding and the Woman Question''. New York: St. Martin's, 1989. * Spacks, Patricia Meyer. ''Desire and Truth: Functions of Plot in Eighteenth-Century English Novels''. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990. * Watt, Ian. ''The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding''. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957.


External links

*
''The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling''
from
Project Gutenberg Project Gutenberg (PG) is a volunteer Volunteering is a voluntary act of an individual or group freely giving time and labour for community service. Many volunteers are specifically trained in the areas they work, such as medicine, educati ...
(plain text and HTML) *
''Tom Jones'' Map
*
''Tom Jones the Musical''
full album audio at
Internet Archive The Internet Archive is an American digital library A digital library, also called an online library, an internet library, a digital repository, or a digital collection is an online databaseAn online database is a database In computing ...
{{DEFAULTSORT:History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, The 1749 novels British novels adapted into films British novels adapted into plays Novels adapted into operas Novels by Henry Fielding 18th-century British novels Picaresque novels English novels Novels set in Somerset