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George Lewis "Tex" Rickard (January 2, 1870 – January 6, 1929) was an American
boxing Boxing is a combat sport A combat sport, or fighting sport, is a competitive contact sport that usually involves one-on-one combat. In many combat sports, a contestant wins by scoring more points than the opponent or by disabling the opponent ...

boxing
promoter, founder of the
New York Rangers The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York City. They compete in the National Hockey League (NHL) as a member of the Metropolitan Division in the Eastern Conference (NHL), Eastern Conference. The team plays its home ...

New York Rangers
of the
National Hockey League The National Hockey League (NHL; french: Ligue nationale de hockey—LNH) is a professional ice hockey sports league, league in North America comprising 32 teams—25 in the United States and 7 in Canada. It is considered to be the premier pr ...
(NHL), and builder of the third incarnation of Madison Square Garden in New York City. During the 1920s, Tex Rickard was the leading promoter of the day, and he has been compared to
P. T. Barnum Phineas Taylor Barnum (; July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891) was an American showman, businessman, and politician, remembered for promoting celebrated hoaxes and founding the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, Barnum & Bailey Circus (1871 ...
and
Don King Don, don or DON and variants may refer to: Places *Don, Benin, a town in Benin *Don, Dang, a village and hill station in Dang district, Gujarat, India *Don, Nord, a ''commune'' of the Nord ''département'' in northern France *Don, Tasmania, a sma ...
. Sports journalist
Frank Deford Benjamin Franklin Deford III (December 16, 1938 – May 28, 2017) was an American sportswriter Sports journalism is a form of writing that reports on matters pertaining to sporting topics and competitions. Sports journalism started in th ...

Frank Deford
has written that Rickard "first recognized the potential of the star system." Rickard also operated several saloons, hotels, and casinos, all named Northern and located in Alaska, Nevada, and Canada.


Early years

Rickard was born in
Kansas City, Missouri Kansas City (abbreviated KC or KCMO) is the largest city in Missouri Missouri is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of Stat ...
. His youth was spent in
Sherman, Texas Sherman is a U.S. city in and the county seat of Grayson County, Texas. The city's population in 2020 was 44,002. It is one of the two principal cities in the Sherman–Denison metropolitan area, Sherman–Denison metropolitan statistical area, a ...
, where his parents had moved when he was four years old. His father died, and his mother then moved to
Henrietta, Texas Henrietta is a city in and the county seat of Clay County, Texas, Clay County, Texas, United States. It is part of the Wichita Falls metropolitan area, Wichita Falls metropolitan statistical area. The population was 3,141 at the 2010 United States ...
while he was still a young boy. Rickard became a
cowboy A cowboy is an animal herder A herder is a pastoral A pastoral lifestyle is that of shepherds herd A herd is a social group of certain animals of the same species, either wildness, wild or Domestication, domestic. The form of ...

cowboy
at age 11, after the death of his father. At age 23, he was elected marshal of Henrietta, Texas. He acquired the nickname "Tex" at this time. On July 2, 1894, Rickard married Leona Bittick, whose father was a physician in Henrietta. On February 3, 1895, their son, Curtis L. Rickard, was born. However, Leona Rickard died on March 11, 1895, and Curtis Rickard died on May 4, 1895.


Alaska

In November 1895, Rickard went to Alaska, drawn by the discovery of gold there. Thus he was in the region when he learned of the nearby
Klondike Gold Rush The Klondike Gold Rush was a migration Migration, migratory, or migrate may refer to: Human migration * Human migration, physical movement by humans from one region to another ** International migration, when peoples cross state boundaries an ...
of 1897. Along with most of the other residents of Circle City, Alaska, he hurried to the Klondike, where he and his partner, Harry Ash, staked claims. They eventually sold their holdings for nearly $60,000. They then opened the Northern, a saloon, hotel, and gambling hall in
Dawson City Dawson City, officially the City of Dawson, is a town in the Canadian territory A territory is an administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, administrative region, subnationa ...

Dawson City
,
Yukon Yukon ( ; ; formerly called Yukon Territory and sometimes referred to as The Yukon) is the smallest and westernmost of Canada's three territories. It also is the least populated province or territory in Canada, with a population of 35,874 peo ...

Yukon
, Canada. Rickard lost everything—including his share of the Northern—through gambling. While working as a poker dealer and bartender at the Monte Carlo saloon and gambling hall, he and
Wilson Mizner Wilson Mizner (May 19, 1876 – April 3, 1933) was an American playwright, raconteur, and entrepreneur. His best-known plays are ''The Deep Purple'', produced in 1910, and ''The Greyhound'', produced in 1912. He was manager and co-owner of The B ...

Wilson Mizner
began promoting boxing matches. In spring 1899, with only $35, Rickard (and many others) left to chase the gold strikes in Nome, Alaska. Rickard was a friend of
Wyatt Earp Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp (March 19, 1848 – January 13, 1929) was an Old West lawman and gambler in the American West The Western United States (also called the American West, the Far West, and the West) is the region In geography ...

Wyatt Earp
who was also a boxing fan and had officiated a number of matches during his life, including the infamous match between
Bob Fitzsimmons Robert James "Bob" Fitzsimmons (26 May 1863 – 22 October 1917) was a British professional boxer Boxing is a combat sport A combat sport, or fighting sport, is a competitive contact sport that usually involves one-on-one combat. In man ...

Bob Fitzsimmons
and
Tom Sharkey Thomas "Sailor Tom" Sharkey (November 26, 1873 – April 17, 1953) was a boxer who fought two fights with heavyweight champion James J. Jeffries. Sharkey's recorded ring career spanned from 1893 to 1904. He is credited with having won 40 fig ...

Tom Sharkey
in San Francisco on December 2, 1896. Rickard sent Earp a number of letters belittling Wyatt's steady but small income managing a store in St. Michael as "chickenfeed" and persuaded him to relocate to Nome. The two were lifelong friends, although for a brief period of time, they operated competing saloons in Nome. Earp and a partner owned the Dexter Saloon, and Rickard owned the Northern hotel and bar. In 1902, Rickard married Edith Mae Haig of
Sacramento, California ) , image_map = Sacramento County California Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Sacramento Highlighted.svg , mapsize = 250x200px , map_caption = Location within Sacramento ...

Sacramento, California
. They had a daughter, Bessie, who died in 1907. Edith Rickard died on October 30, 1925, at her home in New York City.


Nevada

By 1906, Rickard was running the Northern saloon and casino in
Goldfield, Nevada Goldfield is an unincorporated community and the county seat of Esmeralda County, Nevada. It is a census-designated place, with a resident population of 268 at the 2010 United States Census, 2010 census, down from 440 in 2000. Goldfield is locate ...

Goldfield, Nevada
. In Goldfield, he promoted professional boxing match between
Joe Gans Joe Gans (born Joseph Gant; November 25, 1874 – August 10, 1910) was an American professional boxer Professional boxing, or prizefighting, is regulated, sanctioned boxing Boxing is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing boxin ...
and
Battling Nelson Oscar Matthew "Battling" Nelson (June 5, 1882 – February 7, 1954), was a Danish-American professional boxer who held the World Lightweight championship. He was also nicknamed "the Durable Dane". Personal history Nelson was born Oscar Math ...

Battling Nelson
. The gate receipt of $69,715 set a record. A year later, Rickard opened the
Northern Hotel Northern Hotel is a historic hotel located at 19 North Broadway in the Downtown Core of Billings, Montana, United States. History Construction of the original three-story Northern Hotel was begun in 1902 by two of Billings' early business tycoo ...
in
Ely, Nevada Ely (, ) is the largest city and county seat of White Pine County, Nevada, White Pine County, Nevada, United States. Ely was founded as a stagecoach station along the Pony Express and Central Overland Route. In 1906 copper was discovered. Ely's m ...
. Rickard also organized the Ely Athletic club and was the owner of several mining properties in the Ely area. In December 1909, Rickard and John Gleason won the right to stage the world heavyweight championship fight between
James J. Jeffries James Jackson "Jim" Jeffries (April 15, 1875 – March 3, 1953) was an American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion. He was known for his enormous strength and stamina. Using a technique taught to him by his trainer, former Welte ...
and
Jack JohnsonJack Johnson may refer to: Entertainment * Jack Johnson (musician) (born 1975), American singer-songwriter, director, and surfer * Jack Johnson, member of the American pop-rap duo Jack & Jack * Big Jack Johnson (1940–2011), blues musician * Jack ...
. Rickard planned to hold the fight on July 4, 1910, in
San Francisco San Francisco (; Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigenous to Spain **Spanish language **Spanish cuisine Other places * Spanish, Ontario, Canada * Spanish River (dis ...

San Francisco
, however opposition from Governor
James Gillett James Norris Gillett (September 20, 1860 – April 20, 1937) was an American lawyer and politician. A Republican Party (United States), Republican involved in federal and state politics, Gillett was elected both a member of the United States Hous ...

James Gillett
and Attorney General
Ulysses S. Webb Ulysses Sigel Webb (September 29, 1864 – July 31, 1947) was an American lawyer A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, attorney at lawAttorney at law or attorney-at-law, usually abbreviated in everyday speech ...

Ulysses S. Webb
caused Rickard to move it to
Reno, Nevada Reno ( ) is a city in the northwest section of the U.S. state of Nevada, along the Nevada-California border, about from Lake Tahoe, known as "The Biggest Little City in the World". Known for its casino and tourism industry, Reno is the county ...
. Rickard and Gleason made a profit of about $120,000 on the fight, which was won by Johnson.


South America

On February 18, 1911, Rickard announced that he was "through with the business of prize fighting" and set sail for
Argentina Argentina (), officially the Argentine Republic ( es, link=no, República Argentina), is a country located mostly in the southern half of South America South America is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasse ...

Argentina
. There, he acquired between 270,000 and 327,000 acres in
Paraguay Paraguay (; ), officially the Republic of Paraguay ( es, República del Paraguay, links=no; gn, Tetã Paraguái, links=no), is a country in South America South America is a entirely in the and mostly in the , with a relatively sma ...

Paraguay
to start a cattle ranch. Rickard managed the ranch for the , whose land holdings in South America total over 5 million acres. At its peak, the ranch consisted of about 1 million acres and had between 20,000 and 50,000 head of cattle. In 1913, Rickard's ranch was involved in a political controversy between Paraguay, Argentina,
Bolivia Bolivia ; ay, Wuliwya ; Quechuan languages, Quechua: ''Puliwya'' , officially the Plurinational State of Bolivia, is a landlocked country located in western-central South America. The constitutional capital is Sucre, while the seat of g ...

Bolivia
, and
Brazil Brazil ( pt, Brasil; ), officially the Federative Republic of Brazil (Portuguese: ), is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers (3.2 million square miles) and with over 211 mill ...

Brazil
. Two of his employees were killed by Bolivian soldiers stationed in the disputed territory. That same year, Rickard accompanied
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ( ; October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or his initials T. R., was an American politician, statesman, conservationist, naturalist, historian, and writer who served as the 26th president o ...

Theodore Roosevelt
on part of the Roosevelt–Rondon Scientific Expedition. The cattle business failed by the end of 1915. Rickard's loss was stated to be about $1 million.


Hockey

According to NHL.com, in 1924 Tex Rickard was the first man to refer to the
Montreal Canadiens The Montreal CanadiensEven in English, the French spelling is always used instead of ''Canadians''. The French spelling of ''Montréal'' is also sometimes used in the English media. (french: link=no, Les Canadiens de Montréal), officially ' ...

Montreal Canadiens
as "the Habs." Rickard apparently told a reporter that the "H" on the Canadiens' sweaters was for "Habitants". At the time, this was a pejorative term equivalent to ''
redneck ''Redneck'' is a derogatory term chiefly, but not exclusively, applied to white Americans perceived to be crass and unsophisticated, closely associated with rural In general, a rural area or a countryside is a geographic area that is loca ...

redneck
'' in Canadian French.


Return to boxing

In 1916, Rickard returned to the United States. On February 3,
Jess Willard Jess Myron Willard (December 29, 1881 – December 15, 1968) was an American world heavyweight boxing champion billed as the Pottawatomie Giant who knocked out Jack Johnson (boxer), Jack Johnson in April 1915 for the heavyweight title. Willard wa ...
agreed to Rickard's offer to fight
Frank Moran Francis Charles Moran (18 March 1887 – 14 December 1967) was an American boxer and film actor who fought twice for the List of heavyweight boxing champions, Heavyweight Championship of the World, and appeared in over 135 movies in a 25-yea ...

Frank Moran
in
New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of ...

New York City
. The fight was held on March 17, 1916, at
Madison Square Garden Madison Square Garden, colloquially known as The Garden or by its initials MSG, is a multi-purpose indoor arena in New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state Stat ...
, then in its second incarnation, at 26th Street and
Madison Avenue Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough A borough is an administrative division in various English language, English-speaking countries. In principle, the term ''borough'' designates a self-governing walled town, although in ...
in
Manhattan Manhattan (), known regionally as ''The City'', is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs 5 is a number, numeral, and glyph. 5, five or number 5 may also refer to: * AD 5, the fifth year of the AD era ...

Manhattan
. The $152,000 in gate receipts set a new record for an indoor event and the purse was the largest ever awarded for a no decision. Rickard promoted the July 4, 1919 fight between world heavyweight champion Jess Willard and
Jack Dempsey William Harrison "Jack" Dempsey (June 24, 1895 – May 31, 1983), nicknamed Kid Blackie, and The Manassa Mauler, was an American professional boxer who competed from 1914 to 1927, and reigned as the world heavyweight champion from 1919 to 1926. ...

Jack Dempsey
in
Toledo, Ohio Toledo ( ) is a city in and the county seat A county seat is an administrative centerAn administrative centre is a seat of regional administration or local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public admin ...
. The fight only drew 20,000 to 21,000 spectators (the area seated 80,000) and the total receipts were estimated to be $452,000. After expenses, Rickard made a profit of $100,000. After the Willard–Dempsey fight, Rickard began bidding for a title match between Dempsey and
Georges Carpentier Georges Carpentier (; January 12, 1894 – October 28, 1975) was a French boxer Boxing is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing protective gloves and other protective equipment such as hand wraps and mouthguards, throw punches ...

Georges Carpentier
. The Jack Dempsey vs. Georges Carpentier fight took place on July 2, 1921, in a specially built arena in
Jersey City, New Jersey Jersey City is the second-most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark, New Jersey, Newark.
. The bout, which drew a record crowd of 90,000, was the first-ever boxing fight to produce a million dollar gate (at a then record of $1,789,238) as well as the first world title fight to be carried over on radio. Rickard's profit on the fight was reported to be $550,000. On July 12, 1920, shortly after the
Walker Law The Walker Law passed in 1920 was an early New York New York most commonly refers to: * New York City, the most populous city in the United States, located in the state of New York * New York (state), a state in the northeastern United States ...
reestablished legal boxing in the state of New York, Rickard secured a ten-year lease of Madison Square Garden from its owner, the
New York Life Insurance Company New York Life Insurance Company (NYLIC) is the third-largest life insurance Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations, generally known simply as the Commonwealth, is a polit ...
. He promoted a number of championship as well as amateur boxing bouts at the Garden. His largest gate at the Garden came from the Jack Dempsey– Bill Brennan fight on December 14, 1920. The
Benny Leonard Benny Leonard (born Benjamin Leiner; April 7, 1896 – April 18, 1947) was a Jewish Americans, Jewish American professional Boxing, boxer who held the world lightweight championship for eight years, from 1917 to 1925. Widely considered one of the ...
–Ritchie Mitchell and Johnny Wilson
Mike O'Dowd Michael Joseph O'Dowd (April 5, 1895 in St. Paul, Minnesota – July 28, 1957) was an American boxer who held the World Middleweight Championship from 1917 to 1920. Biography O'Dowd won the title on November 14, 1917 by knocking out Al McCoy ...
fights also drew well. In addition to boxing, Rickard hosted a number of other events, including six-day bicycle races, and constructed the world's largest indoor swimming pool at the Garden. On February 17, 1922, Rickard was indicted on charges of abducting and sexually assaulting four underage girls. He lost his license to make and promote boxing matches in New York State and gave up control of the Garden. Rickard was found not guilty on one of the indictments on March 29, 1922, and the others were dropped as a result. After the trial, Rickard's attorney, , accused two workers of the
New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children The New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children was founded in 1874 (and incorporated in 1875) as the world's first Child protection, child protective agency. It is sometimes called the Gerry Society after one of its co-founders, El ...
of demanding $50,000 from Rickard in exchange for the girls changing their testimony at trial; however, the district attorney could not find any evidence to corroborate this claim. On May 12, 1923, Rickard promoted the first boxing card at
Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium is a baseball park A baseball park, also known as a ballpark or diamond, is a stadium, venue where baseball is played. A baseball park consists of the baseball field, playing field and the surrounding spectator seating. While ...
. It drew 60,000 spectators (a then-record crowd for a boxing bout in New York state) and made $182,903.26, which was donated to
Millicent Hearst Millicent Veronica Hearst (née Willson; July 16, 1882 – December 5, 1974), was the wife of media tycoon William Randolph Hearst William Randolph Hearst Sr. (; April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, newspape ...
's Milk Fund. On September 14, 1923, Rickard promoted his second million dollar gate when around 100,000 people attended the Jack Dempsey vs. Luis Ángel Firpo fight at the
Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the name of three stadiums in Upper Manhattan, New York City, used mainly for professional baseball and American football from 1880 through 1963. The original Polo Grounds, opened in 1876 and demolished in 1889, was built f ...
. In September 1924, Rickard promoted the fight between and Harry Willis in Jersey City. The fight was attended by 60,000, but the paid attendance was only 48,500. Rickard lost $5,005 on the bout. On March 19, 1925, Rickard was convicted of violating a federal law that prevented the interstate transportation of fight films. He faced jail time, but was instead fined $7,000. In 1926, Rickard promoted the Jack Dempsey–
Gene Tunney James Joseph "Gene" Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was an American professional boxer Professional boxing, or prizefighting, is regulated, sanctioned boxing Boxing is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing boxing gl ...

Gene Tunney
fight at Sesquicentennial Stadium in
Philadelphia Philadelphia (colloquially known simply as Philly) is the largest city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is ...

Philadelphia
. The bout attracted a world record crowd of 135,000 and brought in a record gate of $1.895 million. He also promoted the rematch, now known as
The Long Count Fight The Long Count Fight, or the Battle of the Long Count, was a professional boxing 10-round rematch between world heavyweight champion Gene Tunney and former champion Jack Dempsey, which Tunney won in a unanimous decision. It took place on September ...

The Long Count Fight
, which was held on September 22, 1927, at
Soldier Field Soldier Field is a multi-purpose stadium A multi-purpose stadium is a type of stadium A stadium (plural stadiums or stadia) is a place or venue for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts, or other events and consists of a field or stage ei ...

Soldier Field
in Chicago. This fight brought in the first $2 million gate ($2.658 million) and was the first of feature a $1 million purse.


Madison Square Garden

On May 31, 1923, Rickard filed incorporation papers for the New Madison Square Garden Corporation, a company formed for the purpose of building and operating a new sports arena in New York City. In 1924 he purchased a car barn block on Eighth Avenue between 49th and 50th Streets. He acquired the rights to the name Madison Square Garden, as the building's owners planned on tearing it down and replacing it with an office building. Thomas W. Lamb was selected to design the new building. Destruction of the car barns began on January 9, 1925. The new arena opened on November 28, 1925. The first event was the preliminaries for the annual six-day bicycle race. It hosted its first major event on December 11, 1925, when a record indoor crowd of 20,000 attended the
Paul Berlenbach Paul Berlenbach (February 18, 1901 – September 30, 1985) was the world light heavyweight boxing champion from May 30, 1925, when he wrested the crown from Mike McTigue, until July 16, 1926, when he was defeated by his nemesis Jack Delaney. ''The ...
-
Jack Delaney Jack Delaney (March 19, 1900 – November 27, 1948) was a world light heavyweight boxing champion and contender for the heavyweight crown. One of the most popular fighters of the 1920s, the French Canadian was born Ovila Chapdelaine in Saint-Fr ...
fight. The $148,155 gate broke the record for an indoor boxing event. In January 1926, Rickard purchased WWGL radio, which he moved to the Garden and renamed WMSG. Following the success of the
New York Americans The New York Americans, colloquially known as the Amerks, were a professional ice hockey Ice hockey is a contact Contact may refer to: Interaction Physical interaction * Contact (geology)A geological contact is a boundary which separa ...
in the Garden's first year, the Madison Square Garden Corporation decided to establish a second team, this one controlled by the corporation itself. The new team was nicknamed "Tex's Rangers" and later became known as the
New York Rangers The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York City. They compete in the National Hockey League (NHL) as a member of the Metropolitan Division in the Eastern Conference (NHL), Eastern Conference. The team plays its home ...

New York Rangers
.


Other ventures

Rickard sought to repeat the success of the Madison Square Garden by building seven "Madison Square Gardens" around the country. In 1927, a group led by Rickard signed a 25-year lease for a sports arena at the new
North Station North Station is a commuter rail and intercity rail terminal station in Boston, Massachusetts. It is served by four MBTA Commuter Rail lines – the Fitchburg Line, Haverhill Line, Lowell Line, and Newburyport/Rockport Line – and the Amtrak i ...
facility in
Boston Boston (, ), officially the City of Boston, is the capital city, capital and List of municipalities in Massachusetts, most populous city of the Commonwealth (U.S. state), Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States and 21st List of Unit ...

Boston
. The
Boston Garden Boston Garden was an arena An arena is a large enclosed platform, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theatre Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of performing art that uses live performers, usually ac ...
opened on November 17, 1928. In 1929, Rickard and George R. K. Carter opened the Miami Beach Kennel Club greyhound track. They also planned a number of other ventures, including a jai-alai grounds adjacent to the kennel club and a horse track on an island in
Biscayne Bay Biscayne Bay () is a lagoon A lagoon is a shallow body of water separated from a larger body of water by a narrow , such as s, s, s, or . Lagoons are commonly divided into ''coastal lagoons'' and '' lagoons''. They have also been identifi ...
. Rickard also hoped to someday to build a hotel and casino that would rival those in
Monte Carlo Monte Carlo (; ; french: Monte-Carlo , or colloquially ''Monte-Carl'' ; lij, label= Monégasque, Munte Carlu; ) is officially an administrative area of the Principality of Monaco Monaco (; ), officially the Principality of Monaco (french: ...

Monte Carlo
.


Personal life

Rickard met Maxine Hodges, a former actress 33 years his junior at the Dempsey–Firpo fight. The couple married on October 7, 1926, in
Lewisburg, West Virginia Lewisburg is a List of cities in West Virginia, city in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, Greenbrier County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 3,830 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Greenbrier County. Geography Lewisbu ...
. On June 7, 1927, the couple's daughter, Maxine Texas Rickard, was born. On December 26, 1928, Rickard left New York for
Miami Beach, Florida Miami Beach is a coastal resort city ski resort, Slovakia A resort town, often called a resort city or resort destination, is an urban area where tourism or vacationing is the primary component of the local culture and economy. A typi ...

Miami Beach, Florida
, where he was completing arrangements for a fight between
Jack Sharkey Jack Sharkey (born Joseph Paul Zukauskas, lt, Juozas Povilas Žukauskas, October 26, 1902 – August 17, 1994) was a Lithuanian-American world heavyweight boxing champion. Early life Sharkey was born to Lithuanian immigrants, in Binghamto ...
and
Young Stribling William Lawrence Stribling Jr. (December 26, 1904 – October 3, 1933), known as Young Stribling, was an American professional boxing, boxer who fought from Featherweight to Heavyweight from 1921 until 1933. He was the elder brother of fellow b ...
and attending the opening of the Miami Beach Kennel Club. On New Year's Eve, Rickard was stricken with appendicitis and was operated on. Rickard died on January 6, 1929, due to complications from his appendectomy. He was interred at Woodlawn Cemetery,
Bronx The Bronx () is a Boroughs of New York City, borough of New York City, coextensive with Bronx County, in the U.S. state of New York (state), New York. It is south of Westchester County, New York, Westchester County; north and east of the New Yor ...

Bronx
, NY. Investigations into the untimely and suspicious nature of the death of not one but two wives remain unsolved.


References


External links

* {{DEFAULTSORT:Rickard, Tex 1870 births 1929 deaths American boxing promoters New York Rangers executives Businesspeople from Kansas City, Missouri
People of the Klondike Gold Rush Canadian gold prospectors American gold prospectors Klondike Gold Rush People of the American Old West People from Yukon 19th-century American people 19th-century Canadian people ...
Stanley Cup champions People from Henrietta, Texas Burials at Woodlawn Cemetery (Bronx, New York) Madison Square Garden Sports