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The ''San Francisco Chronicle'' is a newspaper serving primarily the
San Francisco Bay Area The San Francisco Bay Area, popularly referred to as the Bay Area, is a populous region surrounding the San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Pablo Bay, San Pablo, and Suisun Bay estuary, estuaries in Northern California. Although the exact bou ...
of
Northern California Northern California (colloquially known as NorCal) is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. Spanning the state's northernmost 48 counties, its main population centers incl ...

Northern California
. It was founded in 1865 as ''The Daily Dramatic Chronicle'' by teenage brothers
Charles de Young Charles de Young (January 8, 1846 – April 23, 1880), along with his younger brother M. H. de Young, founded the newspaper The Daily Dramatic Chronicle, which became the '' San Francisco Chronicle'', and was its editor-in-chief. He was murdered b ...

Charles de Young
and Michael H. de Young. The paper is owned by the
Hearst Corporation Hearst Communications, Inc., often referred to simply as Hearst, is an American multinational mass media and business informationBusiness information is one of the three main segments of the information industry. The other two segments are ''s ...

Hearst Corporation
, which bought it from the de Young family in 2000. It is the only major daily paper covering the city and county of San Francisco. The paper benefited from the growth of San Francisco and had the largest
newspaper circulation Print circulation is the average number of copies of a publication To publish is to make content Content or contents may refer to: Media * Content (media), information or experience provided to audience or end-users by publishers or media ...
on the
West Coast of the United States#REDIRECT West Coast of the United States The West Coast of the United States, also known as the Pacific Coast, Pacific states, and the western seaboard, is the coastline along which the Western United States The Western United States (also calle ...
by 1880. Like other newspapers, it has experienced a rapid fall in circulation in the early 21st century and was ranked 24th by circulation nationally for the six months to March 2010. In 1994, the newspaper launched the SFGate website, including both content from the paper and other sources. In 2013, the newspaper launched its own
namesake A namesake is a person, geographic location, building or other entity that has the same name as another or that is named after another entity that first had the name. The opposing term, referring to the original entity after which something els ...
website, SFChronicle.com, and began the separation of the SFGate and ''Chronicle'' brands, which today are two separately run entities.


History

The ''Chronicle'' was founded by brothers
Charles Charles is a masculine given name A given name (also known as a first name or forename) is the part of a personal name A personal name, or full name, in onomastic Onomastics or onomatology is the study of the etymology, histor ...

Charles
and M. H. de Young in 1865 as ''The Daily Dramatic Chronicle'', funded by a borrowed $20 gold piece. Their brother Gustavus was named with Charles on the masthead. Within 10 years, it had the largest circulation of any newspaper west of the
Mississippi River The Mississippi River is the second-longest river and chief river A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases, a river flows into the ground and b ...

Mississippi River
. The paper's first office was in a building at the corner of Bush and . The brothers then commissioned a building from
Burnham and Root Burnham and Root was one of Chicago's most famous architectural companies of the nineteenth century. It was established by Daniel Burnham, Daniel Hudson Burnham and John Wellborn Root. During their eighteen years of partnership, Burnham and Root ...
at 690
Market StreetMarket Street may refer to: *Market Street, Cambridge, England *Market Street, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia *Market Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia *Market Street, Manchester, England *Market Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia * ...
at the corner of Third and Kearney Streets to be their new headquarters, in what became known as
Newspaper Row A newspaper is a Periodical literature, periodical publication containing written News, information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background. Newspapers can cover a wide variety of fields such as po ...
. The new building, San Francisco's first skyscraper, was completed in 1889. It was damaged in the 1906 earthquake, but it was rebuilt under the direction of William Polk, Burnham's associate in San Francisco. That building, known as the "Old ''Chronicle'' Building" or the "DeYoung Building", still stands and was restored in 2007. It is a historic landmark and is the location of the
Ritz-Carlton Club and Residences The Ritz-Carlton Club and Residences is a luxury residential skyscraper in the Financial District, San Francisco, Financial District of San Francisco, California. The residences are built atop the historic Old Chronicle Building, sometimes called ...
. In 1924, the ''Chronicle'' commissioned a new headquarters at 901
Mission Street Mission Street is a north-south arterial thoroughfare in Daly City, California, Daly City and San Francisco, California that runs from Daly City's southern border to San Francisco's northeast waterfront. The street and San Francisco's Mission Distr ...
on the corner of 5th Street in what is now the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood of San Francisco. It was designed by Charles Peter Weeks and William Peyton Day in the
Gothic Revival architecture Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, neo-Gothic, or Gothick) is an that began in the late 1740s in England. The movement gained momentum and expanded in the first half of the 19th century, as increasingly serious and learned ad ...
style, but most of the Gothic Revival detailing was removed in 1968 when the building was re-clad with stucco. This building remains the ''Chronicle''s headquarters in 2017, although other concerns are located there as well. Between
World War II World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a global war A world war is "a war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literatur ...
and 1971, new editor
Scott Newhall Scott Newhall (January 21, 1914 – October 26, 1992) was a newspaper editor known for his stewardship of the ''San Francisco Chronicle The ''San Francisco Chronicle'' is a newspaper serving primarily the of . It was founded in 1865 as ''The ...
took a bold and somewhat provocative approach to news presentation. Newhall's ''Chronicle'' included investigative reporting by such journalists as
Pierre Salinger Pierre Emil George Salinger (June 14, 1925 – October 16, 2004) was an American journalist, author and politician. He served as the ninth press secretary A press secretary or press officer is a senior advisor who provides advice on how to ...

Pierre Salinger
, who later played a prominent role in national politics, and
Paul Avery Paul Avery (April 2, 1934December 10, 2000) was an American journalist, best known for his reporting on the serial killer known as the Zodiac Killer, Zodiac, and later for his work on the Patty Hearst kidnapping. Early life Avery was born in Ho ...
, the staffer who pursued the trail of the self-named "
Zodiac Killer The Zodiac Killer is the pseudonym of a serial killer who operated in Northern California in the late 1960s. The case has been described as the most famous unsolved murder case in American history, becoming a Zodiac Killer in popular culture, fi ...
", who sent a
cryptogram A cryptogram is a type of puzzle that consists of a short piece of encrypted In cryptography, encryption is the process of Code, encoding information. This process converts the original representation of the information, known as plaintext, i ...

cryptogram
in three sections in letters to the ''Chronicle'' and two other papers during his murder spree in the late 1960s. It also featured such colorful columnists as
Pauline Phillips Pauline Esther "Popo" Phillips (née Friedman; July 4, 1918 – January 16, 2013), also known as Abigail Van Buren, was an American advice columnist and radio show host who began the ''Dear Abby'' column in 1956. It became the most widely syndica ...
, who wrote under the name "
Dear Abby Dear Abby is an American advice column founded in 1956 by Pauline Phillips under the pen name "Abigail Van Buren" and carried on today by her daughter, Jeanne Phillips, who now owns the legal rights to the pen name. History According to Pauline ...
," "Count Marco" (Marc Spinelli),
Stanton Delaplane Stanton Hill ("Stan") Delaplane (12 October 1907 – 18 April 1988) was a travel writer The genre of travel literature encompasses outdoor literature, guide books, nature writing, and travel memoirs. One early travel memoirist in Western literatu ...
, Terence O'Flaherty,
Lucius Beebe Lucius Morris Beebe (December 9, 1902 – February 4, 1966) was an American author, gourmand A gourmand is a person who takes great pleasure and interest in consuming good food and drink. ''Gourmand'' originally referred to a person who was "a g ...
, Art Hoppe,
Charles McCabe Charles McCabe (1915–1983) was a columnist A columnist is a person who writes for publication in a series, creating an article that usually offers commentary and opinions. Columns A column or pillar in architecture File:Plan d'exéc ...
, and
Herb Caen Herbert Eugene Caen (; April 3, 1916 February 1, 1997) was a San Francisco humorist and journalist whose daily columnist, column of local goings-on and insider gossip, social and political happenings, and offbeat puns and anecdotes—"A continuo ...
. The newspaper grew in circulation to become the city's largest, overtaking the rival ''
San Francisco Examiner The ''San Francisco Examiner'' is a newspaper distributed in and around San Francisco, California, and published since 1863. The longtime "Monarch of the Dailies" and flagship of the Hearst Corporation chain, the ''Examiner'' converted to free di ...

San Francisco Examiner
''. The demise of other San Francisco dailies through the late 1950s and early 1960s left the ''Examiner'' and the ''Chronicle'' to battle for circulation and readership superiority.


Joint operating agreement

The competition between the ''Chronicle'' and ''Examiner'' took a financial toll on both papers until the summer of 1965, when a merger of sorts created a
Joint Operating Agreement The Newspaper Preservation Act of 1970 was an Act of the United States Congress, signed by President Richard Nixon, authorizing the formation of joint operating agreements among competing newspaper operations within the same market area. It exempte ...
under which the ''Chronicle'' became the city's sole morning daily while the ''Examiner'' changed to afternoon publication (which ultimately led to a declining readership). The newspapers were officially owned by the San Francisco Newspaper Agency, which managed sales and distribution for both newspapers and was charged with ensuring that one newspaper's circulation did not grow at the expense of the other.
Revenue In accounting Accounting or Accountancy is the measurement ' Measurement is the number, numerical quantification (science), quantification of the variable and attribute (research), attributes of an object or event, which can be used to comp ...
was split equally, which led to a situation widely understood to benefit the ''Examiner'', since the ''Chronicle'', which had a circulation four times larger than its rival, subsidized the afternoon newspaper.Gorney, Cynthia Gorney (January/February 1999)
"The State of The American Newspaper – The Battle Of the Bay"
ajr.org. ''
American Journalism Review The ''American Journalism Review'' (''AJR'') was an American magazine A magazine is a periodical publication Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of serial Serial may refer to: ...
''. Retrieved November 17, 2012.
The two newspapers produced a joint Sunday edition, with the ''Examiner'' publishing the news sections and the Sunday magazine, and the ''Chronicle'' responsible for the tabloid-sized entertainment section and the book review. From 1965 on the two papers shared a single classified-advertising operation. This arrangement stayed in place until the Hearst Corporation took full control of the ''Chronicle'' in 2000.


Push into the suburbs

Beginning in the early 1990s, the ''Chronicle'' began to face competition beyond the borders of San Francisco. The newspaper had long enjoyed a wide reach as the de facto "
newspaper of record A newspaper of record is a major newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of Serial (publishing), serial published, publications that appear ...
" in Northern California, with distribution along the Central Coast, the Central Valley, and even as far as
Honolulu Honolulu (; ) is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller lo ...

Honolulu
, Hawaii. There was little competition in the Bay Area suburbs and other areas that the newspaper served, but as Knight-Ridder consolidated the ''
Mercury News ''The Mercury News'' (formerly ''San Jose Mercury News'', often locally known as ''The Merc'') is a morning daily newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) ...
'' in 1975; purchased the ''Contra Costa Times'' (now ''
East Bay Times The ''East Bay Times'' is a daily broadsheet newspaper based in Walnut Creek, California, United States owned by the Bay Area News Group (BANG), as subsidiary of Digital First Media, that serves Contra Costa County, California, Contra Costa and ...
'') in 1995; and as the Denver-based
Media News Group MNG Enterprises, Inc., Trade name, doing business as Digital First Media and MediaNews Group, is a Denver, Colorado-based newspaper publisher owned by Alden Global Capital. The company has been growing its portfolio and as of May 2021, owns over 1 ...
made a rapid purchase of the remaining newspapers on the East Bay by 1985, the ''Chronicle'' realized it had to step up its suburban coverage. The ''Chronicle'' launched five zoned sections to appear in the Friday edition of the paper. The sections covered San Francisco and four different suburban areas. They each featured a unique columnist, enterprise pieces, and local news specific to the community. The newspaper added 40 full-time staff positions to work in the suburban bureaus. Despite the push to focus on suburban coverage, the ''Chronicle'' was hamstrung by the Sunday edition, which, being produced by the San Francisco-centric "un-''Chronicle''" ''Examiner'', had none of the focus on the suburban communities that the ''Chronicle'' was striving to cultivate.


Sale to Hearst

The de Young family controlled the paper, via the
Chronicle Publishing Company The Chronicle Publishing Company was a print and broadcast media corporation headquartered in San Francisco San Francisco (; Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigeno ...
, until July 27, 2000, when it was sold to , which owned the ''Examiner''. Following the sale, the Hearst Corporation transferred the ''Examiner'' to the Fang family, publisher of the ''
San Francisco Independent The ''San Francisco Independent'' was the largest non-daily newspaper in the United States. It helped to popularize the free newspaper as a business model at the beginning of the 21st century, and also rescued the ''San Francisco Examiner'' from b ...
'' and ''
AsianWeek ''AsianWeek'' was America's first and largest English language print and on-line publication serving Asian Americans. The news organization played an important role nationally and in the San Francisco Bay Area as the “Voice of Asian America”. ...
'', along with a $66-million subsidy. Under the new owners, the ''Examiner'' became a free
tabloid Tabloid may refer to: * Tabloid journalism, a type of journalism * Tabloid (newspaper format), a newspaper with compact page size ** Chinese tabloid * Tabloid (paper size), a North American paper size * Tabloid (film), ''Tabloid'' (film), a 2010 d ...
, leaving the ''Chronicle'' as the only daily
broadsheet A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format Newspaper formats vary substantially, with different formats more common in different countries. The size of a newspaper format refers to the size of the paper page; the printed area within that ...
newspaper in San Francisco. In 1949, the de Young family founded
KRON-TV KRON-TV, virtual channel 4 (Very high frequency, VHF digital terrestrial television, digital channel 7), is a MyNetworkTV-network affiliate, affiliated television station city of license, licensed to San Francisco, San Francisco, California, Uni ...
(Channel 4), the Bay Area's third television station. Until the mid-1960s, the station (along with KRON-FM), operated from the basement of the ''Chronicle'' Building, on Mission Street. KRON moved to studios at 1001 Van Ness Avenue (on the former site of St. Mary's Cathedral, which burned down in 1962). KRON was sold to
Young Broadcasting Young Broadcasting, LLC was an American media company that owned or operated 12 television station A television station is a set of equipment managed by a business, organisation or other entity, such as an amateur television (ATV) operator, t ...
in 2000 and, after years of being San Francisco's
NBC The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America (USA), c ...
affiliate, became an independent station on January 1, 2002, when NBC—tired of Chronicle's repeated refusal to sell KRON to the network and, later, Young's asking price for the station being too high—purchased
KNTV KNTV, virtual channel In most telecommunications Telecommunication is the transmission of information by various types of technologies over wire, radio, Optical system, optical, or other Electromagnetism, electromagnetic systems. It has ...
in San Jose from
Granite Broadcasting Corporation Granite Broadcasting Limited liability company, LLC is a broadcasting holding company in New York City which owns one television station in the United States, in Syracuse, New York. Granite was founded by W. Don Cornwell and Stuart Beck in 1988, a ...
for $230 million. Since the Hearst Corporation took ownership in 2000 the ''Chronicle'' has made periodic changes to its organization and design, but on February 1, 2009, as the newspaper began its 145th year of publication, the ''Chronicle'' Sunday edition introduced a redesigned paper featuring a modified logo, new section, and page organization, new features, bolder, colored section-front banners and new headline and text typography. The frequent bold-faced, all-capital-letter headlines typical of the ''Chronicle''s front page were eliminated. Editor Ward Bushee's note heralded the issue as the start of a "new era" for the ''Chronicle''. On July 6, 2009, the paper unveiled some alterations to the new design that included yet newer section fronts and wider use of color photographs and graphics. In a special section publisher, Frank J. Vega described new, state-of-the-art printing operations enabling the production of what he termed "A Bolder, Brighter ''Chronicle''." The newer look was accompanied by a reduction in size of the broadsheet. Such moves are similar to those made by other prominent American newspapers such as the ''
Chicago Tribune The ''Chicago Tribune'' is a daily newspaper based in Chicago (''City in a Garden''); I Will , image_map = , map_caption = Interactive maps of Chicago , coordinates = , coordinates_footnote ...

Chicago Tribune
'' and ''
Orlando Sentinel The ''Orlando Sentinel'' is the primary newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of serial Serial may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and med ...
'', which in 2008 unveiled radically new designs even as changing reader demographics and general economic conditions necessitated physical reductions of the newspapers. On November 9, 2009, the ''Chronicle'' became the first newspaper in the nation to print on high-quality glossy paper. The high-gloss paper is used for some section fronts and inside pages.


Staff

The current publisher of the ''Chronicle'' is Bill Nagel. Audrey Cooper was named editor-in-chief in January 2015 and was the first woman to hold the position. In June 2020 she left to be the editor-in-chief of WNYC, New York City. In August 2020, Hearst named Emilio Garcia-Ruiz the publication's editor in chief. Ann Killion has written for ''
Sports Illustrated ''Sports Illustrated'' (''SI'') is an American sports magazine owned by Authentic Brands Group, and was first published in August 1954. It was the first magazine with circulation over one million to win the National Magazine Award for General ...
''. Carl Nolte is a journalist and columnist. Tom Stienstra is a columnist.


Web

The newspaper's websites are at SFGate.com (free) and SFChronicle.com (premium). Originally ''The Gate'', SFGate was one of the earliest major market newspaper websites to be launched, on November 3, 1994, at the time of
The Newspaper Guild The NewsGuild-CWA is a trade union, labor union founded by newspaper journalists in 1933. In addition to improving wages and working conditions, its constitution says its purpose is to fight for honesty in journalism and the news industry's busi ...
strike Strike may refer to: People *Strike (surname)Strike is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: *Alice Strike (1896–2004), last surviving female Canadian military World War I veteran *Anne Wafula Strike (born 1969), British wheelcha ...
; the union published its own news website, ''San Francisco Free Press'', whose staff joined SFGate when the strike ended. SFChronicle.com launched in 2013 and since 2019 has been run separately from SFGate, whose staff are independent of the print newspaper. across all platforms the Chronicle has 34 million unique visitors each month, with SFGate receiving 135.9 million pageviews and 25.1 million unique visitors per month and SFChronicle.com 31.3 million pageviews and 31.3 million unique visitors per month globally.


Praise, criticism, and features

The paper has received the
Pulitzer Prize#REDIRECT Pulitzer Prize The Pulitzer Prize () is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature and musical composition within the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of Joseph ...
on a number of occasions. Despite an illustrious and long history, the paper's news reportage is not as extensive as in the past. The current day ''Chronicle'' has followed the trend of other American newspapers, devoting increasing attention to local and regional news and cultural and entertainment criticism to the detriment of the paper's traditionally strong national and international reporting, though the paper does maintain a Washington, D.C., bureau. This increased focus on local news is a response to the competition from other Bay Area newspapers including the resurrected ''
San Francisco Examiner The ''San Francisco Examiner'' is a newspaper distributed in and around San Francisco, California, and published since 1863. The longtime "Monarch of the Dailies" and flagship of the Hearst Corporation chain, the ''Examiner'' converted to free di ...

San Francisco Examiner
'', the ''
Oakland Tribune The ''Oakland Tribune'' is a weekly newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of serial Serial may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media ...
'', the ''East Bay Times'' (formerly ''Contra Costa Times'') and the ''
Mercury News ''The Mercury News'' (formerly ''San Jose Mercury News'', often locally known as ''The Merc'') is a morning daily newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) ...

Mercury News
''.
Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada co-authored the book ''Game of Shadows'' while they were reporters for the ''San Francisco Chronicle''. For their investigative work in the field of steroids, Williams and Fainaru-Wada were given the 2004 Georg ...
received the 2004 George Polk Award for Sports Reporting. Fainaru-Wada and Williams were recognized for their work on uncovering the
BALCO The Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative (BALCO) (1984–2003) was an American company led by founder and owner Victor Conte. In 2003, journalists Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada investigated the company's role in a drug sports scandal later re ...
scandal, which linked
San Francisco Giants The San Francisco Giants are an American professional baseball team based in San Francisco. The Giants compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) National League West, West division. Founded in 1883 as t ...
star
Barry Bonds Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. He received a record seven National Leagu ...
to performance-enhancing drugs. While the two above-named reporters broke the news, they are by no means the only sports writers of note at the ''Chronicle''. The ''Chronicle''s sports section, edited by Al Saracevic and called ''Sporting Green'' as it is printed on green-tinted pages, is staffed by a dozen writers. The section's best-known writers are its columnists: Bruce Jenkins, Ann Killion, Scott Ostler, Saracevic and Tom Stienstra. Its baseball coverage is anchored by Henry Schulman, John Shea, and Susan Slusser, the first female president of the
Baseball Writers' Association of America The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association A professional association (also called a professional body, professional organization, or professional society) usually seeks to further Further or Furthur may ...
(BBWAA). The ''Chronicle's'' Sunday arts and entertainment insert section is called ''Datebook'', and has for decades been printed on pink-tinted paper in a tabloid format. Movie reviews (for many years written by nationally known critic
Mick LaSalle Mick LaSalle (born May 7, 1959) is an American film critic Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories: journalistic criticism which appears regularl ...
) feature a unique rating system: instead of stars or a "thumbs up" system, the ''Chronicle'' has for decades used a small cartoon icon, sitting in a movie theater seat, known as the "Little Man," explained in 2008 by the ''
Chicago Sun-Times The ''Chicago Sun-Times'' is a daily newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of Serial (publishing), serial published, publications that a ...

Chicago Sun-Times
'' film critic
Roger Ebert Roger Joseph Ebert (; June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American Film criticism, film critic, film historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the ''Chicago Sun-Times'' from 1967 until his death in 2013. In ...

Roger Ebert
: "...the only rating system that makes any sense is the Little Man of the ''San Francisco Chronicle'', who is seen (1) jumping out of his seat and applauding wildly; (2) sitting up happily and applauding; (3) sitting attentively; (4) asleep in his seat; or (5) gone from his seat." Another area of note is the architecture column by John King; the ''Chronicle'' is still one of the few American papers to present a regular column on architectural issues. The paper also has regular weekly sections devoted to Food & Home and Style.


Challenges

Circulation has fallen sharply since the
dot-com boom The dot-com bubble, also known as the dot-com boom, the tech bubble, and the Internet bubble, was a stock market bubble Stock (also capital stock) is all of the Share (finance), shares into which ownership of a corporation is divided.Long ...
peaked from around 1997 to 2001. The ''Chronicle''s daily readership dropped by 16.6% between 2004 and 2005 to 400,906; The ''Chronicle'' fired one quarter of its newsroom staff in a cost-cutting move in May 2007. Newspaper executives pointed to growth of SFGate, the online website with 5.2 million unique visitors per month – fifth among U.S. newspaper websites in 2007. In February 2009, Hearst chief executive Frank A. Bennack Jr., and Hearst President Steven R. Swartz, announced that the ''Chronicle'' had lost money every year since 2001 and more than $50 million in 2008. Without major concessions from employees and other cuts, Hearst would put the papers up for sale and, if no buyer was found, shut the paper. San Francisco would have become the first major American city without a daily newspaper. The cuts were made. In spite of – or perhaps because of – the threats, the loss of readers and advertisers accelerated. On October 26, 2009, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported that the ''Chronicle'' had suffered a 25.8% drop in circulation for the six-month period ending September 2009, to 251,782 subscribers, the largest percentage drop in circulation of any major newspaper in the United States. ''Chronicle'' publisher Frank Vega said the drop was expected as the paper moved to earn more from higher subscription fees from fewer readers. In May 2013, Vega retired and was replaced as publisher by former ''
Los Angeles Times The ''Los Angeles Times'' (abbreviated as ''LA Times'') is a daily newspaper A newspaper is a containing written and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background. Newspapers can cover a wide variety of fields such as , ...

Los Angeles Times
'' publisher Jeffrey M. Johnson. SFGate, the main digital portal for the ''San Francisco Chronicle'', registered 19 million unique visitors in January 2015, making it the seventh-ranked newspaper website in the United States.


Publishers

* M. H. de Young, 1865–1925 * George T. Cameron, 1925–1955 * Charles de Young Thieriot, 1955–1977 * Richard Tobin Thieriot, 1977–1993 * John Sias, 1993–1999. (First publisher not to be a member of the de Young/Cameron/Thieriot family) * Steven Falk, 2003–2004 * Frank Vega, 2004–2013 * Jeffrey M. Johnson, 2013–2018 * Bill Nagel, 2018–present


See also

*'' San Francisco Chronicle Magazine'' *
Chronicle Publishing Company The Chronicle Publishing Company was a print and broadcast media corporation headquartered in San Francisco San Francisco (; Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigeno ...
*
Chronicle Books Chronicle Books is a San Francisco San Francisco (; Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigenous to Spain **Spanish language **Spanish cuisine Other places * Spanish, ...
* Chronicle Features *
KRON-TV KRON-TV, virtual channel 4 (Very high frequency, VHF digital terrestrial television, digital channel 7), is a MyNetworkTV-network affiliate, affiliated television station city of license, licensed to San Francisco, San Francisco, California, Uni ...


References


External links


SFGate: Online version of the newspaper
contains freely searchable archive of all articles since 1995

contains instructions on searching archived papers 1865–1922
"''Chronicle'' Sold to Hearst/''Examiner'' goes on sales block"


{{Authority control San Francisco Chronicle, 1865 establishments in California De Young family George Polk Award recipients Hearst Communications publications Daily newspapers published in the San Francisco Bay Area Publications established in 1865 South of Market, San Francisco Weeks and Day buildings Newspapers published in San Francisco