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The Quirinal Hill (; la, Collis Quirinalis; it, Quirinale ) is one of the
Seven Hills of Rome The seven hills of Rome ( la, Septem colles/montes Romae, it, Sette colli di Roma ) east of the river Tiber File:Rome flood marker.jpg, Rome Historical marker, flood marker, 1598, set into a pillar of the Ospedale di Santo Spirito in Sassia, ...

Seven Hills of Rome
, at the north-east of the city center. It is the location of the official residence of the Italian head of state, who resides in the
Quirinal Palace The Quirinal Palace ( it, Palazzo del Quirinale ) is a historic building in Rome, Italy, one of the three current official residences of the President of Italy, President of the Italian Republic, together with Villa Rosebery in Naples and the Ten ...
; by
metonymy Metonymy () is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is referred to by the name of something closely associated with that thing or concept. Etymology The words ''metonymy'' and ''metonym'' come from the Greek language, Greek , , "a cha ...
"the Quirinal" has come to stand for the Italian president. The Quirinal Palace has an extension of 1.2 million square feet.


History

According to Roman legend, the Quirinal Hill was the site of a small village of the
Sabines The Sabines (; lat, Sabini; grc, Σαβῖνοι ''Sabĩnoi''; it, Sabini, all exonyms) were an Italic peoples, Italic people that lived in the central Apennine Mountains of the ancient Italian Peninsula, also inhabiting Latium north of the An ...
, and king
Titus Tatius 300px, ''The Intervention of the Sabine Women'', by Jacques-Louis David, depicts Titus Tatius at the left According to the Foundation of Rome, Roman foundation myth, Titus Tatius was the king of the Sabines from Cures, Sabinum, Cures and joint-ru ...
would have lived there after the peace between Romans and Sabines. These Sabines had erected
altar An altar is a structure upon which offerings such as sacrifice Sacrifice is the offering of material possessions or the lives of animals or humans to a deity A deity or god is a supernatural The supernatural encompasses supposed phe ...

altar
s in the honour of their
god In monotheism, monotheistic thought, God is conceived of as the supreme being, creator deity, creator, and principal object of Faith#Religious views, faith.Richard Swinburne, Swinburne, R.G. "God" in Ted Honderich, Honderich, Ted. (ed)''The Oxfo ...

god
''
Quirinus In Roman mythology Roman mythology is the body of myths Myth is a folklore genre Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or ...

Quirinus
'' (naming the hill by this god). Tombs from the 8th century BC to the 7th century BC that confirm a likely presence of a Sabine settlement area have been discovered; on the hill, there was the tomb of Quirinus, which
Lucius Papirius Cursor Lucius Papirius Mugillanus Cursor (c.365–after 310 BC) was a celebrated politician and general of the early Roman Republic, who was five times consul Consul (abbrev. ''cos.''; Latin plural ''consules'') was the title of one of the two chief Ro ...
transformed into a
temple A temple (from the Latin ) is a building reserved for spiritual rituals and activities such as prayer and sacrifice. Religions which erect temples include Christianity (whose temples are typically called church (building), churches), Hinduism (w ...
for his triumph after the third
SamniteSamnite is an adjective meaning "having to do with ancient Samnium." Samnite may also refer to: * Samnites, the people of ancient Samnium * Samnite (gladiator type), a gladiator who fought with the equipment and in the manner of a Samnite soldier * ...

Samnite
war. Some authors consider it possible that the cult of the ''
Capitoline Triad The Capitoline Triad was a group of three deities who were worshipped in Religion in ancient Rome, ancient Roman religion in an elaborate temple on Rome's Capitoline Hill (Latin ''Capitolium''). It comprised Jupiter (mythology), Jupiter, Juno (my ...
'' (
Jove Jupiter ( la, Iūpiter or , from Proto-Italic The Proto-Italic language is the ancestor of the Italic languages The Italic languages form a branch of the Indo-European language family, whose earliest known members were spoken in the I ...
,
Minerva Minerva (; ett, Menrva) is the Roman goddess Roman mythology is the body of of as represented in the and . One of a wide variety of genres of , ''Roman mythology'' may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to ...

Minerva
,
Juno Juno commonly refers to: *Juno (mythology), the Roman goddess of marriage and queen of the gods *Juno (film), ''Juno'' (film), 2007 Juno may also refer to: Arts, entertainment and media Fictional characters *Juno, in the film ''Jenny, Juno'' *Jun ...
) could have been celebrated here well before it became associated with the
Capitoline Hill The Capitolium or Capitoline Hill ( ; it, Campidoglio ; la, Mons Capitolinus ), between the Forum Forum (plural forums or fora) may refer to: Common uses * Forum (legal), designated space for public expression in the United States *For ...
. The sanctuary of
Flora Flora is all the plant Plants are predominantly photosynthetic Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to Energy transformation, convert light energy into chemical energy that, through cellular respiration, ca ...
, an
Osco The National Iranian South Oil Company (NISOC) ( fa, شرکت ملی مناطق نفت‌خیز جنوب ایران) is a government-owned corporation under the direction of the Ministry of Petroleum of Iran, and operates as a subsidiary of Nation ...
-Sabine
goddess A goddess is a female Female (symbol: ♀) is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, that produces non-mobile ovum, ova (egg cells). Barring rare medical conditions, most female mammals, including female humans, have two X chromo ...

goddess
, was here too. According to
Livy Titus Livius (; 59 BC – AD 17), known in English as Livy ( ), was a Ancient Rome, Roman historian. He wrote a monumental history of Rome and the Roman people, titled , covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome before the traditiona ...
, the hill first became part of the city of Rome, along with the
Viminal Hill The Viminal Hill (; la, Collis Vīminālis ; it, Viminale ) is the smallest of the famous Seven Hills of Rome The seven hills of Rome ( la, Septem colles/montes Romae, it, Sette colli di Roma ) east of the river Tiber form the geographical ...
, during the reign of
Servius Tullius Servius Tullius was the legendary sixth king of Rome The king of Rome ( la, rex Romae) was the chief magistrate Chief magistrate is a public official, executive or judicial, whose office is the highest in its class. Historically, the two d ...
, Rome' sixth king, in the 6th century BC. In 446 BC, a temple was dedicated on the Quirinal in honour of ''
Semo Sancus Dius Fidius In ancient Roman religion Religion in ancient Rome includes the ethnic religion of Ancient Rome that the ancient Romans, Romans used to define themselves as a people, as well as the religious practices of peoples brought under Roman rule, in ...
,'' and it is possible that this temple was erected over the ruins of another temple.
Augustus Caesar Augustus (23 September 63 BC19 August AD 14) was the first Roman emperor The Roman emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC). The emperors used a variety of different titles through ...

Augustus
, too, ordered the building of a temple, dedicated to
Mars Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System, being larger than only Mercury (planet), Mercury. In English, Mars carries the name of the Mars (mythology), Roman god of war and is often referred to ...
. On a slope of the Quirinal were the extensive
gardens of Sallust The Gardens of Sallust ( la, Horti Sallustiani) was an ancient Roman estate including a landscaping, landscaped pleasure garden developed by the historian Sallust in the 1st century BC. It occupied a large area in the northeastern sector of Rome ...
. On the Quirinal Hill
Constantine Constantine most often refers to: * Constantine the Great Constantine I ( la, Flavius Valerius Constantinus; ; 27 February 22 May 337), also known as Constantine the Great, was a Roman emperor from 306 to 337. Born in Naissus, Dacia Mediterra ...
ordered the erection of his baths, the last ''
thermae , Budapest File:Les mosaïques des thermes 2.JPG, The mosaics of the thermal baths In ancient Rome, (from Greek , "hot") and (from Greek ) were facilities for bathing. usually refers to the large Roman Empire, imperial public bath, bath ...
'' complex erected in
imperial Rome The Roman Empire ( la, Imperium Rōmānum ; grc-gre, Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, Basileía tôn Rhōmaíōn) was the post-Roman Republic, Republican period of ancient Rome. As a polity it included large territorial holdings ar ...

imperial Rome
. These are now lost, having been incorporated into Renaissance Rome, with only some drawings from the 16th century remaining. In the
Middle Ages In the history of Europe The history of Europe concerns itself with the discovery and collection, the study, organization and presentation and the interpretation of past events and affairs of the people of Europe since the beginning of ...
, the ''
Torre delle Milizie
Torre delle Milizie
'' and the
convent A convent is a community of either priest A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the Sacred rite, sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deity, deities. They also have th ...

convent
of St. Peter and Domenic were built, and above Constantine's building was erected the Palazzo Rospigliosi; the two famous colossal marble statues of the "
Horse Tamers by Giovanni Battista Piranesi: the colossal "Horse Tamers" are shadowed in the foreground, but the obelisk from the Mausoleum of Augustus (erected 1783–1786) has not yet been set up between them. Image:RomaObeliscoQuirinale.JPG, An equivalent view ...
", generally identified as the
Dioscuri Castor; grc, Κάστωρ, Kástōr, beaver. and Pollux. (or in Greek, Polydeukes.) are twin half-brothers in Greek mythology, Greek and Roman mythology, known together as the Dioscuri.; grc, Διόσκουροι, Dióskouroi, sons of Zeus, li ...
with horses, which now are in the Piazza Quirinale, were originally in this Palazzo. They gave to the Quirinal its medieval name Monte Cavallo, which lingered into the 19th century, when the hill was transformed beyond all recognition by urbanization of an expanding capital of a united Italy. In the same palazzo were also the two statues of river gods that
Michelangelo Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (; 6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564), known simply as Michelangelo (), was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet of the High Renaissance In art history, the High Renaissance was ...

Michelangelo
moved to the steps of Palazzo Senatorio on the Capitoline Hill. According to the political division of the center of Rome, the Hill belongs to the
rione A (; plural: ) is a neighbourhood in several Italian cities. A is a territorial subdivision. The larger administrative subdivisions in Rome are the , with the being used only in the historic centre. The word derives from the Latin , the 14 sub ...

rione
Trevi TREVI was an intergovernmental network, or forum, of national officials from ministries of justice and the interior outside the European Community The European Economic Community (EEC) was a regional organization and Turkey Turk ...
.


''Palazzo del Quirinale''

The Quirinal Hill is today identified with the ''
Palazzo del Quirinale The Quirinal Palace ( it, Palazzo del Quirinale ) is a historic building in Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus , image_map = Map of comune of Rome (metropol ...
'', the official residence of the
President of the Italian Republic The president of Italy, officially denoted as President of the Italian Republic ( it, Presidente della Repubblica Italiana) is the head of state A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona who officially embodies a state (po ...
and one of the symbols of the State. Before the abolition of the Italian monarchy in 1946, it was the residence of the king of Italy, and before 1871 it was, as originally, a residence of the Pope. The healthy cool air of the Quirinal Hill attracted aristocrats and papal families that built villas where the
gardens of Sallust The Gardens of Sallust ( la, Horti Sallustiani) was an ancient Roman estate including a landscaping, landscaped pleasure garden developed by the historian Sallust in the 1st century BC. It occupied a large area in the northeastern sector of Rome ...
had been in antiquity. A visit to the villa of Cardinal
Luigi d'EsteLuigi d'Este (21 December 1538 – 30 December 1586) was an Italian Catholic cardinal, the second son of the five children of Ercole II d'Este, duchy of Modena, Duke of Modena and Ferrara, and Renée, daughter of Louis XII of France. Image:Cardinale ...
in 1573 convinced
Pope Gregory XIII Pope Gregory XIII ( la, Gregorius XIII; 7 January 1502 – 10 April 1585), born Ugo Boncompagni, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the , with 1.3 billion Catholics . ...

Pope Gregory XIII
to start the building of a summer residence the following year, in an area considered healthier than the
Vatican Hill Vatican Hill (; la, Mons Vaticanus; it, Colle Vaticano) is a hill located across the Tiber river Rome Historical marker, flood marker, 1598, set into a pillar of the Ospedale di Santo Spirito in Sassia, Santo Spirito Hospital near Basilica di ...
or
Lateran , completed after a competition for the design by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 Image:St John Lateran Basilica and Palace.jpg, 250px, View showing Archbasilica and Palace 250px, Basilica and Palace - side view Lateran and Laterano are the shared name ...
: His architects were
Flaminio Ponzio Flaminio Ponzio (1560–1613) was an Italian architect An architect is a person who plans, designs and oversees the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and th ...
and
Ottaviano NonniOttaviano Nonni (1536 – 6 August 1606), called Il Mascherino, was an Italian architect, sculptor, and painter born in Bologna. Apprentice of Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola, he was active in Emilia (region of Italy), Emilia and in Rome, where he had bee ...
, called Mascherino; under
Pope Sixtus V Pope Sixtus V (13 December 1521 – 27 August 1590), born Felice Piergentile, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the , with 1.3 billion Catholics . As the world's old ...

Pope Sixtus V
, works were continued by
Domenico Fontana Image:Federico Zuccari, Ritratto di Domenico Fontana.jpg, 200px, Domenico Fontana by Federico Zuccari Domenico Fontana (154328 June 1607) was an Italians, Italian architect of the late Renaissance, born in today's Ticino. He worked primarily in It ...

Domenico Fontana
(the main facade on the Piazza) and
Carlo Maderno from Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus , image_map = Map of comune of Rome (metropolitan city of Capital Rome, region Lazio, Italy).svg , map_caption ...
, and by
Gian Lorenzo Bernini Gian Lorenzo (or Gianlorenzo) Bernini (, , ; Italian Giovanni Lorenzo; 7 December 159828 November 1680) was an Italian Italian may refer to: * Anything of, from, or related to the country and nation of Italy ** Italians, an ethnic group or simp ...
for
Pope Clement XII Pope Clement XII ( la, Clemens XII; 7 April 16526 February 1740), born Lorenzo Corsini, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number ...

Pope Clement XII
. Gardens were conceived by Maderno. In the 18th century,
Ferdinando Fuga Ferdinando Fuga (11 November 1699 – 7 February 1782) was an Italian architect who was born in Florence Florence ( ; it, Firenze ) is a city in Central Italy and the capital city of the Tuscany Regions of Italy, region. It is the most popu ...

Ferdinando Fuga
built the long wing called the ''Manica Lunga'', which stretched 360 meters along via del Quirinale. In front lies the sloping ''Piazza del Quirinale'' where the pair of gigantic Roman marble "Horse Tamers" representing
Castor and Pollux Castor; grc, Κάστωρ, Kástōr, beaver. and Pollux. (or Polydeukes). are twin half-brothers in Greek mythology, Greek and Roman mythology, known together as the Dioscuri.; grc, Διόσκουροι, Dióskouroi, sons of Zeus, links=no, f ...

Castor and Pollux
, found in the Baths of Constantine, were re-erected in 1588. In Piranesi's view, the vast open space is unpaved. The ''Palazzo del Quirinale'' was the residence of the popes until 1870, though Napoleon deported both
Pius VI Pope Pius VI (born Count Giovanni Angelo Braschi, 25 December 171729 August 1799) was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the , with 1.3 billion Catholics . As the world's ...

Pius VI
and
Pius VII Pope Pius VII (14 August 1742 – 20 August 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by numb ...

Pius VII
to France, and declared the Quirinale an imperial palace. When Rome was united to the
Kingdom of Italy The Kingdom of Italy ( it, Regno d'Italia) was a state that existed from 1861—when King Victor Emmanuel II en, Victor Emmanuel Mario Albert Eugene Ferdinand Thomas , house = House of Savoy, Savoy , father = Charles Albert o ...

Kingdom of Italy
, the Quirinale became the residence of the kings until 1946. Today, the Palazzo hosts the offices and the apartments of the Head of State and, in its long side along ''via XX Settembre'' (the so-called ''Manica Lunga''), the apartments that were furnished for each visit of foreign monarchs or dignitaries. Several collections are in this Palazzo, including
tapestries Tapestry is a form of textile arts, textile art, traditionally Weaving, woven by hand on a loom. Tapestry is weft-faced weaving, in which all the warp (weaving), warp threads are hidden in the completed work, unlike most woven textiles, where bo ...

tapestries
, paintings,
statue A statue is a free-standing sculpture in which the realistic, full-length figures of persons or animals are carved or Casting (metalworking), cast in a durable material such as wood, metal or stone. Typical statues are life-sized or close to ...

statue
s, old
carriage A carriage is a private four-wheeled vehicle for people and is most commonly horse-drawn A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels an ...

carriage
s (''carrozze''), watches, furniture, and
porcelain Porcelain () is a ceramic A ceramic is any of the various hard, brittle, heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant Corrosion is a Erosion, natural process that converts a refined metal into a more chemically stable form such as oxide, ...

porcelain
. In Piranesi's view, the palazzo on the right is the ''Palazzo della Sacra Consulta'', originally a villa built upon the ruins of the Baths of Constantine, which was adapted by Sixtus V as a civil and criminal court. The present façade was built in 1732–1734 by the architect Ferdinando Fuga on the orders of
Pope Clement XII Pope Clement XII ( la, Clemens XII; 7 April 16526 February 1740), born Lorenzo Corsini, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number ...

Pope Clement XII
Corsini, whose coat-of-arms, trumpeted by two ''Fames'', still surmounts the roofline balustrade, as in Piranesi's view. It formerly housed Mussolini's ministry of colonial affairs.


Other monuments

The hill is the site of other important monuments and buildings. Many of those built during the
baroque The Baroque (, ; ) is a style Style is a manner of doing or presenting things and may refer to: * Architectural style, the features that make a building or structure historically identifiable * Design, the process of creating something * Fashi ...

baroque
period reflect the personal and spiritual aspirations of powerful local families: *The church of
Sant'Andrea al Quirinale
Sant'Andrea al Quirinale
was designed by
Gian Lorenzo Bernini Gian Lorenzo (or Gianlorenzo) Bernini (, , ; Italian Giovanni Lorenzo; 7 December 159828 November 1680) was an Italian Italian may refer to: * Anything of, from, or related to the country and nation of Italy ** Italians, an ethnic group or simp ...
(1658–1671), for Cardinal Camillo Pamphilii (nephew of
Pope Innocent X Pope Innocent X ( la, Innocentius X; 6 May 1574 – 7 January 1655), born Giovanni Battista Pamphilj (or Pamphili), was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 15 September 1644 to his death in 1655. Born in Rome of a f ...

Pope Innocent X
); it is one of the most elegant samples of
baroque The Baroque (, ; ) is a style Style is a manner of doing or presenting things and may refer to: * Architectural style, the features that make a building or structure historically identifiable * Design, the process of creating something * Fashi ...

baroque
architecture in Rome, with its splendid interior of marble, stuccoes, and gilded decorations. *The four fountains (''
Quattro Fontane The Quattro Fontane (the Four Fountains) is an ensemble of four Late Renaissance Fountain, fountains located at the intersection of Via delle Quattro Fontane and Via del Quirinale in Rome. They were commissioned by Pope Sixtus V and built at the d ...

Quattro Fontane
'') with reclining river gods (1588–93) commissioned by
Pope Sixtus V Pope Sixtus V (13 December 1521 – 27 August 1590), born Felice Piergentile, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the , with 1.3 billion Catholics . As the world's old ...

Pope Sixtus V
. *
Borromini
Borromini
's church of
San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane The church of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane (Saint Charles at the Four Fountains), also called , is a Roman Catholic Roman or Romans usually refers to: *Rome, the capital city of Italy *Ancient Rome, Roman civilization from 8th century BC to 5th ...

San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane
(or San Carlino – originally ''Chiesa della Santissima Trinità e di San
Carlo Borromeo Charles Borromeo ( it, Carlo Borromeo; la, Carolus Borromeus; 2 October 1538 – 3 November 1584) was the Archbishop of Milan The Archdiocese of Milan ( it, Arcidiocesi di Milano; la, Archidioecesis Mediolanensis) is a metropolitan see of the C ...

Carlo Borromeo
''), the first and last work of this architect (the façade was completed after his death) commissioned by the
Barberini The Barberini are a family of the Nobility of Italy, Italian nobility that rose to prominence in 17th century Rome. Their influence peaked with the election of Cardinal Maffeo Barberini to the papal throne in 1623, as Pope Urban VIII. Their urban ...
. *The
Piazza A town square (or square, plaza, public square, city square, urban square, or piazza) is an open public space A public space is a place that is generally open and accessible to people. Roads (including the sidewalk, pavement), public squar ...
and
Palazzo Barberini The Palazzo Barberini ( en, Barberini Palace) is a 17th-century palace in Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus Romulus was the legendary founder and first king of R ...

Palazzo Barberini
, built by
Bernini Gian Lorenzo (or Gianlorenzo) Bernini (, US English , ; Italian Giovanni Lorenzo; 7 December 159828 November 1680) was an Italians, Italian sculptor and architect. While a major figure in the world of architecture, he was more prominently the lea ...
and Maderno, which now houses the
Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica (GNAA), or National Gallery of Ancient Art, is an art gallery in Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus , image_map = ...
. *Palazzo Volpi di Misurata, across from San Carlino, built in the 18th century. *Palazzo Albani del Drago, built by
Domenico Fontana Image:Federico Zuccari, Ritratto di Domenico Fontana.jpg, 200px, Domenico Fontana by Federico Zuccari Domenico Fontana (154328 June 1607) was an Italians, Italian architect of the late Renaissance, born in today's Ticino. He worked primarily in It ...

Domenico Fontana
and enlarged with an added belvedere, by
Alessandro Specchi Image:PzaFarnesePalGallo.JPG, 250px, The Palazzo Pichini-Gallo, Rome built by Alessandro Specchi Alessandro Specchi (1668 – 16 November 1729) was an Italy, Italian architect and engraver. Biography Born in 1668 in Rome, he trained as an arch ...
for the Albani
Pope Clement XI Pope Clement XI ( la, Clemens XI; 23 July 1649 – 19 March 1721), born Giovanni Francesco Albani, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 23 November 1700 to his death in 1721. Clement XI was a patron of the arts ...

Pope Clement XI
; with the decline in the fortunes of Cardinal
Alessandro Albani Alessandro Albani (15 October 1692 – 11 December 1779) was a Roman Catholic cardinal, but should be best remembered as a leading collector of antiquities, dealer and art patron in Rome. He supported the art historian, Johann Joachim Winckelmann ...
, it was sold to the del Drago, who occupy it still. *Palazzo Baracchini, built 1876–83, now housing the Ministry of Defense. *The church of San Silvestro al Quirinale, which was described for the first time circa 1000, rebuilt in the 16th century and restructured (façade) in the 19th. *The Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, ''Angelicum'' *The
Palazzo Colonna The Palazzo Colonna () is a palatial block of buildings in central Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus , image_map = Map of comune of Rome (metropolitan city ...

Palazzo Colonna
(17th century), in front of Palazzo Rospigliosi, contains some remains of
Caracalla Caracalla ( ; 4 April 188 – 8 April 217), formally known as Antoninus (Marcus Aurelius Antoninus), was Roman emperor from 198 to 217. He was a member of the Severan dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler ...

Caracalla
's temple of
Serapis Serapis ( grc-koi, Σέραπις, later form) or Sarapis (, earlier form, originally Demotic: ''wsjr-ḥp,'' "Osiris Osiris (, from Egyptian ''wsjr'', Coptic ) is the ancient Egyptian deities, god of fertility, agriculture, the Egyptian ...

Serapis
*The
Palazzo della Consulta The Constitutional Court of Italy in Palazzo della Consulta, is among the Quirinal Hill government buildings in Rome. The Palazzo della Consulta (built 1732–1735) is a late Baroque palace in central Rome, Italy, that since 1955 houses the Cons ...
hosts today the
Constitutional Court A constitutional court is a high court High court usually refers to the superior court In common law systems, a superior court is a court A court is any person or institution, often as a government institution, with the authority to Ad ...
, and was erected by
Ferdinando Fuga Ferdinando Fuga (11 November 1699 – 7 February 1782) was an Italian architect who was born in Florence Florence ( ; it, Firenze ) is a city in Central Italy and the capital city of the Tuscany Regions of Italy, region. It is the most popu ...

Ferdinando Fuga
for
Pope Clement XII Pope Clement XII ( la, Clemens XII; 7 April 16526 February 1740), born Lorenzo Corsini, was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number ...

Pope Clement XII
directly opposite Palazzo del Quirinale. *The Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi (17th century) built by Giorgio Vasanzio and
Carlo Maderno from Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus , image_map = Map of comune of Rome (metropolitan city of Capital Rome, region Lazio, Italy).svg , map_caption ...
*Proximate to the Baths of Constantine and the modern Sacripanti Palace, there is the dome of Titus Claudinanus and his female partner Claudia Vera. The local water pipes are inscribed with the initials of their names, which define Claudia as the "true girl" (in
Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became ...

Latin
: ''c(larissima) f(emina)'').


See also


References


External links


Samuel Ball Platner, ''A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome''
Quirinal Hill



official site.
More info about Quirinal Area
{{coord, 41, 54, 04, N, 12, 29, 18, E, region:IT-RM_type:mountain_source:dewiki, display=title Seven hills of Rome Piazzas in Rome Tourist attractions in Rome Rome R. II Trevi