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Nassau ( ) is the
capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case is the distinction between the letters Letter, letters, or literature may refer to: Characters typeface * Letter (alphabet) A letter is a segmental symbol A symbol ...
and largest city of
The Bahamas The Bahamas (), known officially as The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is a sovereign country within the Lucayan Archipelago The Lucayan Archipelago (named for the original native Lucayan people The Lucayan () people were the original resid ...
. With a population of 274,400 as of 2016, or just over 70% of the entire population of The Bahamas (≈391,000), Nassau is commonly defined as a
primate city A primate city (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of the Roman ...
, dwarfing all other towns in the country. It is the centre of commerce, education, law, administration, and media of the country.
Lynden Pindling International Airport Lynden Pindling International Airport , formerly known as Nassau International Airport (1957–2006), is the largest airport in the Bahamas The Bahamas (), known officially as The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is a sovereign country with ...
, the major airport for the Bahamas, is located about west of the city centre of Nassau, and has daily flights to major cities in
Canada Canada is a country in the northern part of North America North America is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasses. Generally identified by convention (norm), convention rather than any strict criteria, ...

Canada
, the
Caribbean The Caribbean (, ; es, Caribe; french: Caraïbes; ht, Karayib; also gcf, label=Antillean Creole Antillean Creole (Antillean French Creole, Kreyol, Kwéyòl, Patois) is a French-based creole, which is primarily spoken in the Lesser Antilles ...
, the
United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some prefer to use Britain as shorth ...

United Kingdom
and the
United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, states, a Washington, D.C., ...

United States
. The city is located on the island of
New Providence New Providence is the most populous island in The Bahamas The Bahamas (), known officially as The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is a sovereign country within the Lucayan Archipelago The Lucayan Archipelago (named for the original nati ...
, which functions much like a
business district A central business district (CBD) is the commercial and business center of a city. It contains commercial space and offices. In larger cities, it is often synonymous with the city's "financial district". Geographically, it often coincides with ...
. Nassau is the site of the House of Assembly and various judicial departments and was considered historically to be a stronghold of pirates. The city was named in honour of
William III of England, Prince of Orange-Nassau
William III of England, Prince of Orange-Nassau
. Nassau's modern growth began in the late eighteenth century, with the influx of thousands of
Loyalists Loyalism, in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdo ...
and their slaves to the Bahamas following the
American War of Independence The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the Revolutionary War and the American War of Independence, was initiated by delegates from thirteen American colonies of British America British America comprised the colon ...
. Many of them settled in Nassau (then and still the commerce capital of the Bahamas) and eventually came to outnumber the original inhabitants. As the population of Nassau grew, so did its populated areas. Today the city dominates the entire island and its satellite,
Paradise Island Paradise Island is an island in the Bahamas formerly known as Hog Island. The island, with an area of (2.8 km2/1.1 sq mi), is located just off the shore of the city of Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, which is itself located on the northern edge ...
. However, until the post-Second World War era, the outer suburbs scarcely existed. Most of New Providence was uncultivated bush until Loyalists were resettled there following the American Revolutionary War; they established several plantations, such as Clifton and Tusculum. Slaves were imported as labour. After the British abolished the international slave trade in 1807, they resettled thousands of Africans liberated from slave ships by the
Royal Navy The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare Naval warfare is combat Combat ( French for ''fight'') is a purposeful violent conflict meant to physically harm or kill the opposition. Combat may be armed (using weapon A ...
on New Providence (at Adelaide Village and Gambier Village), along with other islands such as Grand Bahama, Exuma, Abaco and Inagua. In addition, slaves freed from American ships, such as the
Creole case The Creole case was a slave revolt A slave rebellion is an armed uprising by enslaved people, as a way of fighting for their freedom. Rebellions of enslaved people have occurred in nearly all societies that practice slavery or have practiced sla ...
in 1841, were allowed to settle there. The largest concentration of Africans historically lived in the "Over-the-Hill" suburbs of Grants Town and Bain Town to the south of the city of Nassau, while most of the inhabitants of European descent lived on the island's northern coastal ridges.


History

The town that would be called Nassau was founded in 1670 by British noblemen who brought British settlers with them to New Providence. They built a fort, and named it Charles Town in honour of England’s King Charles II. During this time there were frequent wars with the
Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigenous to Spain **Spanish language **Spanish cuisine Other places * Spanish, Ontario, Canada * Spanish River (disambiguation), the name of several ...

Spanish
, and Charles Town was used as a base for
privateer A privateer is a private person or ship that engages in maritime warfare under a commission of war. Since robbery under arms was a common aspect of seaborne trade, until the early 19th century all merchant ships carried arms. A sovereign or deleg ...
ing against them. In 1684 the town was burned to the ground during the
Raid on Charles Town The Raid on Charles Town or Spanish raid on New Providence was a Spanish Spanish may refer to: * Items from or related to Spain: **Spaniards, a nation and ethnic group indigenous to Spain **Spanish language **Spanish cuisine Other places * Sp ...
. It was rebuilt in 1695 under Governor
Nicholas Trott Nicholas Trott (19 January 1663 – 21 January 1740) was an 18th-century British judge, legal scholar and writer. He had a lengthy legal and political career in Charleston, South Carolina Charleston is the largest city in the U.S. state of ...
and renamed Nassau in honour of
William of Orange
William of Orange
. William was the Dutch
Stadtholder In the Low Countries The term Low Countries, also known as the Low Lands ( nl, de Lage Landen, french: les Pays-Bas) and historically called the Netherlands ( nl, de Nederlanden), Flanders, or Belgica, refers to a coastal lowland region in No ...
(''stadhouder'' in Dutch), and, from 1689,
William III
William III
, the King of England, Scotland and Ireland. William belonged to a branch of the
House of Nassau The House of Nassau is a diversified aristocratic dynasty in Europe. It is named after the lordship associated with Nassau Castle Nassau Castle, located in Nassau, Germany, Nassau, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, was the original seat of the Hous ...
, from which the city takes its name. The name Nassau ultimately derives from the town of Nassau in Germany. Lacking effective governors after Trott, Nassau fell on hard times. In 1703 Spanish and French allied forces briefly occupied Nassau. More so, Nassau suffered greatly during the
War of Spanish Succession The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) was an early-18th-century European war, triggered by the death in November 1700 of the childless Charles II of Spain. It established the principle that dynastic rights were secondary to maintain ...
and had witnessed Spanish incursions during 1703, 1704 and 1706. From 1703 to 1718 there was no legitimate governor in the colony. Thomas Walker was the island's last remaining appointed official and although evidence is scarce, it appears that he was acting in the role of deputy governor upon
Benjamin Hornigold Captain Benjamin Hornigold (1680–1719) was an English people, English pirate who operated during the tail end of the Golden Age of Piracy. Born in England in the late-17th century, Hornigold began his pirate career in 1713, attacking merchant s ...
's arrival in 1713. By this time, the sparsely settled Bahamas had become a
pirate Piracy is an act of robbery Robbery is the crime In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority. The term ''crime'' does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted ...
haven known as New Providence. The Governor of Bermuda stated that there were over 1,000 pirates in Nassau and that they outnumbered the mere hundred inhabitants of the town. They proclaimed Nassau a pirate republic, recognising the island's prosperous state in which it offered fresh fruit, meat and water and plenty of protection amid its waterways. Nassau's harbour was tailor-made for defence and it could take around 500 vessels, though it was too shallow to accept large battleships. Benjamin Hornigold, along with his great rival
Henry Jennings Henry Jennings (died possibly 1745) was an 18th-century English privateer A privateer is a private person or ship that engages in maritime warfare under a commission of war. Since robbery under arms was a common aspect of seaborne trade, until ...

Henry Jennings
, became the unofficial overlord of a veritable pirate republic which played host to the self-styled Flying Gang. Other pirates that used Nassau as their base included
Charles Vane Charles Vane (c. 1680 – 29 March 1721) was an English pirate who operated in the Bahamas during the end of the Golden Age of Piracy. Vane was likely born in the Kingdom of England around 1680. One of his first pirate ventures was under the l ...
, Thomas Barrow (who declared himself "Governor of New Providence"),
Calico Jack Rackham John Rackham (December 26, 1682November 18, 1720), commonly known as Calico Jack, was an English pirate captain operating in the Bahamas and in Cuba during the early 18th century. His nickname was derived from the Calico (fabric), calico clothing ...
,
Anne Bonny Anne Bonny (8 March 1697 – unknown; possibly 29 December 1733) was an Irish pirate operating in the Caribbean, and one of a few female pirates in recorded history. The little that is known of her life comes largely from Captain Charles Johns ...
,
Mary Read Mary Read (1685 – 28 April 1721), also known as Mark Read, was an English pirate. She and Anne Bonny are two of the most famed women in piracy, female pirates of all time, and among the few women known to have been convicted of piracy durin ...

Mary Read
, and the infamous Edward Teach, better known as "
Blackbeard Edward Teach (alternatively spelled Edward Thatch, – 22 November 1718), better known as Blackbeard, was an English pirate Piracy is an act of robbery Robbery is the crime In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punish ...

Blackbeard
". In 1718, the British sought to regain control of the islands and appointed Captain
Woodes Rogers Woodes Rogers ( 1679 – 15 July 1732) was an English sea captain, privateer, Atlantic slave trade, slave trader and, from 1718, the first List of colonial heads of the Bahamas, Royal Governor of the Bahamas. He is known as the captain of ...
as Royal governor. He successfully clamped down on the pirates, reformed the civil administration, and restored commerce. Rogers cleaned up Nassau and rebuilt the fort, using his own wealth to try to overcome problems. In 1720, the Spanish attacked Nassau but failed to capture the town and the island. During the wars in the
Thirteen Colonies The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies or the Thirteen American Colonies, were a group of Kingdom of Great Britain, British colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America. Founded in the 17th and 18th centuries, th ...
, Nassau experienced an economic boom. With funds from privateering, a new fort, street lights and over 2300 sumptuous houses were built and Nassau was extended. In addition to this, mosquito breeding swamps were filled. In 1776, the
Battle of Nassau The Raid of Nassau (March 3–4, 1776) was a naval operation and Amphibious warfare, amphibious assault by Thirteen Colonies, American forces against the Kingdom of Great Britain, British port of Nassau, Bahamas during the American Revolutionary ...

Battle of Nassau
resulted in a brief occupation by American
Continental Marines The Continental Marines were the Amphibious warfare, amphibious infantry of the Thirteen Colonies, American Colonies (and later the United States) during the American Revolutionary War. The Corps was formed by the Continental Congress on Novem ...
during the
American War of Independence The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the Revolutionary War and the American War of Independence, was initiated by delegates from thirteen American colonies of British America British America comprised the colon ...
, where the Marines staged their first amphibious raid on Fort Montague after attempting to sneak up on Fort Nassau. In 1778 after an overnight invasion, American raiders led by Captain Rathbun, left with ships, gunpowder and military stores after stopping in Nassau for only two weeks. In 1782 Spain captured Nassau for the last time when Don Juan de Cagigal, governor-general of Cuba, attacked New Providence with 5,000 men.
Andrew Deveaux Andrew Deveaux (30 April 1758 – 11 July 1812) was an American Loyalist from South Carolina who is most famous for his Capture of the Bahamas (1783), recapture of the Bahamas in 1783. Early life He was born to plantation owners Andrew Deveaux Seni ...
, an American Loyalist who resettled on the island, set forth and recaptured the island for the British Crown with just 220 men and 150 muskets to face a force of 600 trained soldiers.
Lord Dunmore Earl of Dunmore is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. History The title was created in 1686 for Charles Murray, 1st Earl of Dunmore, Lord Charles Murray, second son of John Murray, 1st Marquess of Atholl. He was made Lord Murray of Blair, Mou ...
governed the colony from 1787 to 1796. He oversaw the construction of Fort Charlotte and Fort Fincastle in Nassau. During the
American Civil War The American Civil War (also known by other names Other most often refers to: * Other (philosophy), a concept in psychology and philosophy Other or The Other may also refer to: Books * The Other (Tryon novel), ''The Other'' (Tryon nove ...
, Nassau served as a port for
blockade runners A blockade runner is a merchant vessel A merchant ship, merchant vessel, trading vessel, or merchantman is a watercraft Watercraft, also known as water vessels or waterborne vessels, are vehicles A vehicle (from la, vehiculum) is a m ...
making their way to and from ports along the southern Atlantic Coast for continued trade with the Confederacy. In the 1920s and 1930s, Nassau profited from
Prohibition in the United States Prohibition Prohibition is the act or practice of forbidding something by law; more particularly the term refers to the banning of the manufacture, storage (whether in barrel A barrel or cask is a hollow cylindrical container with a ...
.


Geography

Located on
New Providence Island New Providence is the most populous island in The Bahamas, containing more than 70% of the total population. It is the location of the national capital, national capital city of Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, whose boundaries are coincident with the ...
, Nassau's harbour has a blend of old world and colonial architecture, and a busy port. The tropical
climate Climate is the long-term pattern of weather Weather is the state of the atmosphere An atmosphere (from the greek words ἀτμός ''(atmos)'', meaning 'vapour', and σφαῖρα ''(sphaira)'', meaning 'ball' or 'sphere') is a la ...

climate
and natural environment of the Bahamas have made Nassau an attractive
tourist at the archaeological site of Chichén Itza. in Vienna. Tourism is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring (disambiguation), touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and th ...

tourist
destination. Nassau developed directly behind the port area. New Providence provides 200 km2 of relatively flat and low-lying land intersected by low ridges (none of which restricted settlement). In the centre of the island there are several shallow lakes that are tidally connected. The city's proximity to the United States (290 km east-southeast of
Miami, Florida Miami (), officially the City of Miami, is a metropolis located in in southeastern , . With a population of 467,963 as of the , it is the 44th-largest city in the United States and the core of the nation's eighth-largest metropolitan area. Th ...

Miami, Florida
) has contributed to its popularity as a holiday resort, especially after the United States imposed a ban on travel to
Cuba Cuba ( , ), officially the Republic of Cuba ( es, República de Cuba, links=no ), is a country comprising the island of Cuba, as well as Isla de la Juventud Isla de la Juventud (; en, Isle of Youth) is the second-largest Cuban islan ...

Cuba
in 1963. The
Atlantis Atlantis ( grc, Ἀτλαντὶς νῆσος, "island of Atlas") is a fiction Fiction generally is a narrative form, in any media (communication), medium, consisting of people, events, or places that are imagination, imaginary—in other ...

Atlantis
resort on nearby
Paradise Island Paradise Island is an island in the Bahamas formerly known as Hog Island. The island, with an area of (2.8 km2/1.1 sq mi), is located just off the shore of the city of Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, which is itself located on the northern edge ...
accounts for more tourist arrivals to the city than any other hotel property of Nassau. The
mega-resort A resort hotel is a hotel which often contains full-sized luxury facilities with full-service accommodations and amenity, amenities. These hotels may attract both business conference center, conferences and vacationing tourists and offer more than ...
employs over 6,000 Bahamians, and is the largest employer outside government.


Climate

Nassau has a
tropical savanna climate Tropical savanna climate or tropical wet and dry climate is a type of climate Climate is the long-term pattern of weather Weather is the state of the atmosphere An atmosphere (from the greek words ἀτμός ''(atmos)'', meanin ...
( Köppen: ''Aw''), bordering on a
tropical monsoon climate An area of tropical monsoon climate (occasionally known as a tropical wet climate or a tropical monsoon and trade-wind littoral climate) is a type of climate Climate is the long-term pattern of weather Weather is the state of the atmos ...
( Köppen: ''Am''), with hot wet summers, and mild dry winters. Temperatures are relatively consistent throughout the course of the year. During the wet season from May through October, average daytime high temperatures are , while during the dry season from November through April daytime temperatures are between , rarely falling below .


Urban development

During the 19th century, Nassau became urbanized, attracting rural residents. Growth since the 1950s has been outwards from the town. The 1788 heart of Nassau was just a few blocks of buildings between Government House and the harbour, but the town gradually expanded east to Malcolm's Park, south to Wulff Road, and west to Nassau Street. Grants Town and Bain Town south of the city became the main residential areas for those of African descent, and until about 30 years ago was the most populous part of the city. Those of European descent built houses along the shore, east as far as Fort Montagu, west as far as Saunders Beach, and along the ridge edging the city. During the 20th century, the city spread east to Village Road and west to Fort Charlotte and Oakes Field. This semicircle of residential development was the main area of settlement until after the Second World War, and marks a distinct phase in the city's expansion, the outer boundary to this zone being the effective limit of the continuous built-up area. The wealthier residents continued to spread east (to East End Point) and West (to
Lyford Cay Lyford Cay is a private gated community located on the western tip of New Providence Island in The Bahamas. The former cay that lent its name to the community is named after Captain William Lyford Jr., a mariner of note in Colonial and Revolution ...
). In the last 40 years, residential development has been quite different. It has consisted mainly of planned middle-income sub-divisions. Since the 1960s, government has sponsored low-cost housing developments at Yellow Elder, Elizabeth Estates, and Pinewood Gardens, in the outer ring.


City centre

The city centre is the hub for all activities in Nassau. Thousands of people visit daily, to shop, dine, sightsee and to enjoy the tropical climate of the city. While the busiest part of central city is the Bay Street thoroughfare and the Woodes Rogers Walk, located across the street from the port and parallel to Bay, the area extends for several blocks in each direction. It starts at West Bay, around the Junkanoo Beach area. A few hotels and restaurants are located on West Bay. The next landmark is the British Colonial Hotel, which marks the beginning of Bay Street proper. Pirates of Nassau Museum is just across from the British Colonial Hilton. The next few blocks of Bay Street are wall-to-wall boutiques, with a few restaurants and clubs interspersed throughout the retailers. Historical landmarks are also in the vicinity, including Vendue House, Christ Church Cathedral, and the Nassau Public Library. Although the tourist part of the city centre peters out after about seven blocks, smaller, more local shops are located down Bay Street. At this point, Bay Street becomes East Bay. The Straw Market is a tourist destination in the city centre. A new market was opened in 2011 after a fire in 2001 destroyed the original Fish, Vegetable and Straw Market. The market is open on all sides, and contains a number of Bahamian craft stores.


Cable Beach

Cable Beach is recognized as the hotel district of Nassau. Five hotels—two of which are all-inclusive—are located on this strip. The area is also known for its dining, with most of the area's restaurants located in the hotels or across the street. There is a bit of shopping, most of it located in the Wyndham and at Baha Mar. In 2017, the development of Baha Mar, a luxury resort and casino, brought more than 2,000 hotel rooms and the largest gaming and convention facility in the Caribbean to this section of New Providence Island.


Demographics

Nassau had a
population Population typically refers the number of people in a single area whether it be a city or town, region, country, or the world. Governments typically quantify the size of the resident population within their jurisdiction by a process called a ...
of 128,420 females and 117,909 males and was home to 70,222
households A household consists of one or several persons who live in the same dwelling In law, a dwelling (also known as a residence or an abode) is a self-contained unit of accommodation used by one or more households A household consists of one ...
with an average family size of 3.5 according to the 2010
census A census is the procedure of systematically calculating, acquiring and recording information Information is processed, organised and structured data Data (; ) are individual facts, statistics, or items of information, often numeric. In ...

census
. Nassau's large population in relation to the remainder of
the Bahamas The Bahamas (), known officially as The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is a sovereign country within the Lucayan Archipelago The Lucayan Archipelago (named for the original native Lucayan people The Lucayan () people were the original resid ...
is the result of waves of
immigration Immigration is the international movement of people to a destination country A country is a distinct territorial body or political entity A polity is an identifiable political entity—any group of people who have a collective ident ...

immigration
from the Family Islands to the
capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case is the distinction between the letters Letter, letters, or literature may refer to: Characters typeface * Letter (alphabet) A letter is a segmental symbol A symbol ...
. Consequently, this has led to the decline in the population of the lesser developed islands and the rapid growth of Nassau.


Public Security

In January 2018, the U.S. Department of State issued the latest in a series of travel advisories due to violent crime. Tourists are often targeted, and armed robbery has increased on all of New Providence.


Transport


Air

Lynden Pindling International Airport Lynden Pindling International Airport , formerly known as Nassau International Airport (1957–2006), is the largest airport in the Bahamas The Bahamas (), known officially as The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is a sovereign country with ...
(formerly Nassau International Airport) is located on the western side of Nassau. New Providence Airport on
Paradise Island Paradise Island is an island in the Bahamas formerly known as Hog Island. The island, with an area of (2.8 km2/1.1 sq mi), is located just off the shore of the city of Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, which is itself located on the northern edge ...
was closed in 1999 with runway removed and integrated into the resort on the island.


Water

Ferries (boats) provide water travel around Nassau to the surrounding islands, namely
Paradise Island Paradise Island is an island in the Bahamas formerly known as Hog Island. The island, with an area of (2.8 km2/1.1 sq mi), is located just off the shore of the city of Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, which is itself located on the northern edge ...
. Prince George Wharf is the main port in the city that serves cruise ships with ports of call in Nassau. Transportation and shipping around the Family Islands is primarily through mailboats based at Potters Cay. International shipping is done through the Arawak Port Department on Arawak Cay. High speed excursions to Exuma, Spanish Wells and Harbour Island are available daily.


Roads

Public jitney buses and taxis provide transport in and around Nassau. Rental cars are also available in the city and at the airport. Major roads in Nassau include: * Bay Street * Eastern Road * Baillou Hill Road (Pronounced "Blue Hill Road" by locals) * East Street * Adelaide Road * Shirley Street * Soldier Road * Carmicheal Road * Prince Charles Drive * John F Kennedy Drive * Fox Hill Road * Wulff Road * Robinson Road The major road in Nassau is Bay Street for tourists. Bay Street runs the entire length of the Island from East to West. Bay Street also provides beachfront views. The downtown area and the cruise ships are in walking distance. The Bahamas is a
left-hand traffic Left-hand traffic (LHT) and right-hand traffic (RHT) are the practices, in bidirectional traffic, of keeping to the left side or to the right side of the road, respectively. They are fundamental to traffic flow In mathematics Mathema ...
country, but many cars are imported from the US are left-hand drive.


Culture


UNESCO Creative Cities Network

Nassau has been recognized as a part of the
UNESCO The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (french: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialised agency United Nations Specialized Agencies are autonomous orga ...

UNESCO
Creative Cities Network The UNESCO Creative Cities Network (UCCN) is a project of UNESCO The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (french: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialise ...
as a city of Crafts and Folk Art. It is one of only three
Caribbean The Caribbean (, ; es, Caribe; french: Caraïbes; ht, Karayib; also gcf, label=Antillean Creole Antillean Creole (Antillean French Creole, Kreyol, Kwéyòl, Patois) is a French-based creole, which is primarily spoken in the Lesser Antilles ...
cities to receive this honour.


Junkanoo

The city's chief festival is
Junkanoo Junkanoo is a street parade A parade is a procession of people, usually organized along a street, often in costume Costume is the distinctive style of dress or cosmetic of an individual or group that reflects class, gender, profession, eth ...

Junkanoo
, an energetic, colourful street parade of brightly costumed people dancing to the rhythmic accompaniment of cowbells, drums and whistles. The word 'Junkanoo' is named after the founder 'John Kanoo'. The celebration occurs on December 26, July 10 and January 1, beginning in the early hours of the morning (1:00 a.m.) and ending around 10 a.m. At the end of the Junkanoo procession, judges award cash prizes for the best music, costumes, and overall group presentation. These Bahamians spend all year preparing their handmade costumes by using coloured crepe paper and cardboard.


In popular culture

Nassau was the main location (however, the filming locations were based around South Africa) for the
Starz Network
Starz Network
show ''Black Sails'' (2014-2017). Nassau was featured as an important location in several movies, including the
Beatles The Beatles were an English rock Rock most often refers to: * Rock (geology) A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals included, its Chemical compou ...

Beatles
film ''Help!'' and the
James Bond The ''James Bond'' series focuses on a fictional British Secret Service The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6, is the foreign intelligence service of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain ...
films '' Thunderball'', (1965) and ''
Never Say Never Again ''Never Say Never Again'' is a 1983 spy film The spy film genre Genre () is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed-upon conventions developed over time. In popular us ...
'', (a remake of ''Thunderball'') (1983) and also for part of the action in '' Casino Royale'' (2006). In 1981, it was used as a location for the ocean scene (in the film portrayed as being in
Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, Elláda, ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeastern Europe Southeast Europe or Southeastern Europe () is a geographical subregion A subregion is a part of a larger region In geogr ...

Greece
) in '' For Your Eyes Only.'' Several other late-20th- and 21st-century movies have been set here, including ''
After the Sunset ''After the Sunset'' is a 2004 American action comedy film Action film is a film genre A film, also called a movie, motion picture or moving picture, is a work of visual art used to simulate experiences that communicate ideas, stories, ...
'', '' Into the Blue'' (2005), and '' Flipper'' (1996). It hosted the
Miss Universe 2009 Miss Universe 2009, the 58th Miss Universe pageant, was held on 23 August 2009 at the Imperial Arena, Imperial Ballroom in Atlantis Paradise Island, Nassau, Bahamas, Nassau, The Bahamas. Stefanía Fernández of Venezuela was crowned by Dayana Me ...
pageant. Nassau was featured as a primary location in the 2013 video game '' Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag'' (2013). Nassau Town is mentioned in "
Sloop John B "Sloop John B" (originally published as "The John B. Sails") is a Bahamian folk song from Nassau. A transcription by Richard Le Gallienne Richard Le Gallienne (20 January 1866 – 15 September 1947) was an English author and poet. The British-A ...
", a Bahamian folk song. Since the early 1950s there have been many recordings of the song, the best known being by
The Beach Boys The Beach Boys are an American rock Rock most often refers to: * Rock (geology) A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals included, its Chemical compo ...

The Beach Boys
on their ''
Pet Sounds ''Pet Sounds'' is the eleventh studio album by the American rock Rock most often refers to: * Rock (geology) A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals i ...
'' album. Nassau is the subject of "
Funky Nassau "Funky Nassau" is a song written by Ray Munnings and Tyrone Fitzgerald and performed by the Beginning of the End. It reached #7 on the US R&B chart, #15 on the ''Billboard'' Hot 100, and #31 on the UK Singles Chart The UK Singles Chart ( ...
," a song written by Ray Munnings and Tyrone Fitzgerald and recorded by the Nassau-based funk band The Beginning of the End in 1971 as the single from their album of the same name. The song reached #7 on the US R&B chart, #15 on the ''Billboard'' Hot 100, and #31 on the
UK Singles Chart The UK Singles Chart (currently titled Official Singles Chart, with the upper section more commonly known as the Official UK Top 40) is compiled by the Official Charts Company The Official Charts Company (previously known as the Chart Inf ...
in 1971.


Twin – sister cities

Nassau has six
sister cities A sister city or twin town relationship is a form of legal or social agreement between two geographically and politically distinct localities for the purpose of promoting cultural and commercial ties. While there are early examples of intern ...
worldwide: *
Detroit (strait A strait is a naturally formed, narrowing, typically navigable waterway that connects two larger bodies of water. The surface water generally flows at the same elevation on both sides and through the strait in either direction. Mo ...

Detroit
, Michigan, USA *
Winston-Salem Winston-Salem is a city A city is a large human settlement.Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd edition. London: Routledg ...
, North Carolina, USAWinston-Salem, NC
. ''Interactive City Directory''. Sister Cities International, Inc. *
Acapulco Acapulco de Juárez (), commonly called Acapulco ( , also ), is a city and major seaport in the Political divisions of Mexico, state of Guerrero on the Pacific coast of Mexico, south of Mexico City. Acapulco is located on a deep, semicircular b ...

Acapulco
,
Mexico Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country A country is a distinct territorial body or political entity A polity is an identifiable political entity—any group of people who have a collective identity, who are organi ...

Mexico
*
Shanghai Shanghai (, , Standard Chinese, Standard Mandarin pronunciation: ) is one of the four Direct-administered municipalities of China, direct-administered municipalities of the China, People's Republic of China. The city is located on the sou ...

Shanghai
,
China China (), officially the People's Republic of China (PRC; ), is a country in East Asia East Asia is the eastern region of Asia Asia () is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere ...

China
* Paraná,
Argentina Argentina (), officially the Argentine Republic ( es, link=no, República Argentina), is a country located mostly in the southern half of South America South America is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasse ...

Argentina
*
Kish Island Kish ( fa, کیش ) is a resort island A resort island (French ''Île-hôtel''; "hotel island") is a hotel complex located on an island; in many cases one luxury hotel may own the entire island. More broadly, resort island can be defined as a ...
,
Iran Iran ( fa, ایران ), also called Persia, and officially the Islamic Republic of Iran, is a country in Western Asia Western Asia, West Asia, or Southwest Asia, is the westernmost subregion A subregion is a part of a larger regio ...

Iran
*
Wanganui Whanganui (; ), previously spelled Wanganui, is a list of cities in New Zealand, city in the Manawatū-Whanganui region of New Zealand. The city is located on the west coast of the North Island at the mouth of the Whanganui River, New Zealand' ...

Wanganui
,
New Zealand New Zealand ( mi, Aotearoa ''Aotearoa'' (; commonly pronounced by English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon Engl ...

New Zealand


Notable residents

* Derrick Atkins (born 1984), World champ sprint Medalist specializing in the 100m *
Deandre Ayton Deandre Edoneille Chidike Ayton (born July 23, 1998) is a Bahamians, Bahamian professional basketball player for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played for the Arizona Wildcats men's basketball, Arizona Wildcats ...
(born 1998), NBA basketball player for the Phoenix Suns. First overall pick in the
2018 NBA Draft The 2018 NBA Draft was held on June 21, 2018, at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York. National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur United States college basketball players and other eligible players, includin ...
. * Andretti Bain (born 1985), Olympic sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m * Jazz Chisholm Jr. (born 1998), Major League Baseball shortstop for the
Miami Marlins The Miami Marlins are an American professional baseball team based in Miami. The Marlins compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) National League East, East division. Their home park is LoanDepot Park. ...
*
Sean Connery Sir Sean Connery (born Thomas Connery; 25 August 1930 – 31 October 2020) was a Scottish actor. He was the first actor to portray fictional British secret agent James Bond The ''James Bond'' series focuses on a fictional British Secre ...

Sean Connery
(1930–2020), Scottish actor, best known for his role as
James Bond The ''James Bond'' series focuses on a fictional British Secret Service The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6, is the foreign intelligence service of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain ...
in seven films *
Kyle Edmund Kyle Steven Edmund (born 8 January 1995) is a British professional tennis Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (Types of tennis match#Singles, singles) or between two teams of two players eac ...

Kyle Edmund
(born 1995), British professional tennis player *
Nick Kyrgios Nicholas Hilmy Kyrgios ( ; born 27 April 1995) is an Australian professional tennis player. He has a career high Association of Tennis Professionals, ATP singles ranking of World No. 13 achieved on 24 October 2016 and is the sixth highest-ran ...

Nick Kyrgios
(born 1995), Australian professional tennis player * Kevin Ferguson aka "Kimbo Slice" (born 1974), mixed martial artist, boxer, bare-knuckle boxing, bare-knuckle boxer, professional wrester *Nathaniel McKinney (born 1982), World champ relay sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m *Ramon Miller (born 1987), Olympic sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m *Shaunae Miller-Uibo (born 1994), Olympic sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m and 200m *Hubert Minnis (born 1954), Politician *Avard Moncur (born 1978), Olympic sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m *Mike Oldfield (born 1953), English musician *Sidney Poitier (born 1927), Bahamian-American actor, film director, author, and diplomat *Antoan Richardson (born 1983), Bahamian Major League Baseball outfielder and coach *Denis Shapovalov (born 1999), Israeli-Canadian tennis player *Tonique Williams-Darling (born 1976), Olympic sprint Medalist specializing in the 400m *Lexi Wilson (born 1991), Bahamian model and beauty pageant titleholder


See also

* Ardastra Gardens, Zoo and Conservation Centre * List of Caribbean Cities and Towns by population * Nassau Public Library


References


External links

*
Official Website for Bahamas Government
!--functioning link--> {{Coord, 25.06, -77.345, display=title Nassau, Bahamas, Capitals in the Caribbean New Providence Piracy in the Caribbean Populated places established in the 17th century Populated places in the Bahamas Port cities in the Caribbean Pirate dens and locations 17th-century establishments in North America 1695 establishments in the British Empire