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The Law Reports is the name of a series of
law report en-GB, Law reports, label=none or en-US, reporters, label=none are series of books that contain Legal opinion, judicial opinions from a selection of case law decided by courts. When a particular judicial opinion is referenced, the law report se ...
s published by the
Incorporated Council of Law Reporting The Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England and Wales (ICLR) is a Charitable organization, registered charity based in London, England, that publishes law reports of English law. The company is widely recognised as a reputable producer of ...
. Pursuant to a Practice Direction given by Lord Judge during his tenure as the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, the Law Reports are "the most authoritative reports" and should always be "cited in preference where there is a choice." This requirement is further referred to in respect of appeals to the Court of Appeal in paragraph 29(2) of Practice Direction 52C of the
Civil Procedure Rules The Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) were introduced in 1997 as per the Civil Procedure Act 1997 and are the rules of English civil procedure, civil procedure used by the Court of Appeal, High Court of Justice, and County Courts in Civil law (common law ...
. This series is now divided into four main sub-series: *Law Reports, Appeal Cases, covering decisions of the
House of Lords The House of Lords, formally The Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the of the . Membership is by , or . Like the , it meets in the . ar ...

House of Lords
(and, since 2009, the
Supreme Court A supreme court is the highest court A court is any person or institution, often as a government institution, with the authority to Adjudication, adjudicate legal disputes between Party (law), parties and carry out the administration of just ...
), the
Privy Council A privy council is a body that advises the head of state A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona A persona (plural personae or personas), depending on the context, can refer to either the public image of one's per ...
and the Court of Appeal – started in 1866 as the Law Reports, English & Irish Appeals, renamed in 1875 and redesigned in 1891; *Law Reports, Chancery Division, covering decisions of the Chancery Division of the High Court – started in 1865 as the Law Reports, Chancery Appeal Cases, renamed in 1875 and redesigned in 1890; *Law Reports, Family Division, covering decisions of the
Family Division The High Court of Justice in London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of ...
of the High Court – started in 1865 as the Law Reports, Probate & Divorce Cases, renamed Law Reports, Probate, Divorce & Admiralty Division in 1875, renamed Law Reports, Probate in 1891 and renamed in 1972; and *Law Reports, Queen's Bench, covering decision of the
Queen's Bench Division The Queen's Bench (); or, during the reign of a male monarch, the King's Bench ('), is the superior court in a number of jurisdictions within some of the Commonwealth realm A Commonwealth realm is a sovereign state A sovereign state ...
of the High Court – started in 1865, renamed Law Reports, Queen's Bench Division in 1875, renamed in 1891, renamed Law Reports, King's Bench in 1901 and renamed in 1952.


Series

The number and names of the series have changed. This is partly due to the merger of existing courts, the merger of existing divisions of individual courts, and the creation of new divisions of individual courts.
Citation A citation is a reference Reference is a relationship between objects in which one object designates, or acts as a means by which to connect to or link to, another object. The first object in this relation is said to ''refer to'' the second o ...
of series has also changed.


1865 to 1875

The Law Reports were originally divided into eleven series.
Glanville Williams Glanville Llewelyn Williams (15 February 1911 – 10 April 1997) was a Welsh legal scholar who was the Rouse Ball Professor of English Law at the University of Cambridge , mottoeng = Literal: From here, light and sacred drau ...
said that "roughly speaking" there was a series for each of the
superior court In common law In law, common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law Case law is the collection of past legal decisions written by courts and similar tribunal A tribunal, generally, is any person or institution ...
s.Glanville Williams, Learning the Law, Eleventh Edition, Stevens, 1982, page 37 The series were: *House of Lords, English and Irish Appeals *House of Lords, Scotch and Divorce Appeals *Privy Council Appeals *Chancery Appeal Cases *Equity Cases *Crown Cases Reserved *Queens Bench Cases *Common Pleas Cases *Exchequer Cases *Admiralty and Ecclesiastical Cases *Probate and Divorce Cases House of Lords, English and Irish Appeals. These reports may be cited thus: House of Lords, Scotch and Divorce Appeals. These reports may be cited in the following ways: Privy Council Appeals. These reports may be cited thus: Chancery Appeal Cases. These reports may be cited in the following ways: Equity Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Crown Cases Reserved. These reports may be cited in the following ways: Queens Bench Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Common Pleas Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Exchequer Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Admiralty and Ecclesiastical Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Probate and Divorce Cases. These reports may be cited thus:


1875 to 1880

In 1875, the number of series was reduced to six. This was due to the creation of the High Court and a decision on the part of the publishers, to put the House of Lords, the Privy Council and the new Court of Appeal in the same volume, and to group Crown Cases Reserved and the Queen's Bench Division together. The series were: *Appeal Cases *Chancery Division *Queens Bench Division *Common Pleas Division *Exchequer Division *Probate Division There was a change in the mode of citation. The abbreviation "LR" ceased to be used. Appeal Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Chancery Division. These reports may be cited thus: Queens Bench Division. These reports may be cited thus: Common Pleas Division. These reports may be cited thus: Exchequer Division. These reports may be cited thus: Probate Division. These reports may be cited thus:


1881 to 1890

In 1881, the number of series was reduced to four. This is because the Common Pleas and Exchequer Divisions of the High Court were incorporated in the Queen's Bench Division of that court in 1880: *Appeal Cases *Chancery Division *Queens Bench Division *Probate Division Appeal Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Chancery Division. These reports may be cited thus: Queens Bench Division. These reports may be cited thus: Probate Division. These reports may be cited thus:


1891 onwards

There have continued to be four series during this period, but their names have changed from time to time. *Appeal Cases *Chancery Division *Queens Bench Division (1891 - 1901, 1952 onwards)/Kings Bench Division (1901 - 1952) (From 1907, this series included decisions of the Court of Criminal Appeal in place of the former
Court for Crown Cases Reserved The Court for Crown Cases Reserved was an English appellate court An appellate court, commonly called an ''appeals court'', ''court of appeals'' (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United ...
.) *Probate (Replaced in 1972 by a series called Family, due to the creation of the Family Division of the High Court) In 1891, there was a change in the mode of citation. Volumes published from 1891 onwards are cited by the year in which they were published and numbered according to the order of publication in that year, if more than one volume has been published in that year. Appeal Cases. These reports may be cited thus: Chancery Division. These reports may be cited thus: Queens Bench Division. These reports may be cited thus: Kings Bench Division. These reports may be cited thus: Probate Division. These reports may be cited thus: Family Division. These reports may be cited thus:


See also

*


References

*O Hood Phillips.
A First Book of English Law ''A First Book of English Law'' is a book originally written by Owen Hood PhillipsOwen Hood Phillips (30 September 1907 - 1986) was Barber Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Birmingham and Dean of the Faculty of Law, Vice-Principal an ...
. Fourth Edition. Sweet & Maxwell. 1960. pp 164 – 166.


External links

* {{Wikisource, The Law Reports Case law reporters English law