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Kathy Acker (April 18, 1947 – November 30, 1997) was an American
experimental An experiment is a procedure carried out to support or refute a hypothesis A hypothesis (plural hypotheses) is a proposed explanation An explanation is a set of statements usually constructed to describe a set of facts which clarifi ...
novelist, playwright, essayist, and
postmodernist Postmodernism is an intellectual stance or mode of discourse defined by an attitude of skepticism Skepticism (American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known a ...
writer, known for her idiosyncratic and transgressive writing that dealt with themes such as
childhood trauma Childhood trauma is often described as serious adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Children may go through a range of experiences that classify as psychological trauma, these might include neglect, Child abandonment, abandonment, Child sexual abu ...
, sexuality and rebellion. She was influenced by the
Black Mountain School Black Mountain College was an experimental college founded in 1933 by John Andrew Rice, Theodore Dreier, and several others. Based in Black Mountain, North Carolina, the school was ideologically organized around John Dewey, John Dewey's principles ...
poets,
William S. Burroughs William Seward Burroughs II (; February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997) was an American writer and visual artist, credited as a primary figure of the Beat Generation The Beat Generation was a literary movement started by a group ...
,
David Antin David Abram Antin (February 1, 1932 – October 11, 2016) was an American poet, critic and performance artist. Education and early career Antin was born in New York City in 1932. After graduating from Brooklyn Technical High School, he earned hi ...
,
Carolee Schneeman Carolee Schneemann (October 12, 1939 – March 6, 2019) was an American visual artist, visual experimental artist, known for her multi-media works on the body, narrative, human sexuality, sexuality and gender. She received a Bachelor of Arts, B.A. ...
,
Eleanor Antin Eleanor Antin (née Fineman; February 27, 1935) is an American performance art Performance art is an artwork or art exhibition created through actions executed by the artist or other participants. It may be witnessed live or through document ...
, French critical theory, mysticism, and
pornography Pornography (often shortened to porn) is the portrayal of Human sexual activity, sexual subject matter for the exclusive purpose of sexual arousal.
, as well as
classic literature A classic is a book accepted as being exemplary or noteworthy, for example through an imprimatur such as being listed in a list of great books, or through a reader's personal opinion. Although the term is often associated with the Western canon, i ...
.


Biography

The sole biological daughter of Donald and Claire (née Weill) Lehman, Kathy Acker was born Karen Lehman in New York City, in 1947, although the
Library of Congress The Library of Congress (LC) is the research library A library is a collection of materials, books or media that are easily accessible for use and not just for display purposes. It is responsible for housing updated information in order ...

Library of Congress
gives her birth year as 1948, while The Editors of
Encyclopædia Britannica The (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia") is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia which is now published exclusively as an online encyclopedia, online encyclopaedia. It was formerly published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., ...
gave her birth year as April 18, 1948, New York, New York, U.S. and died Nov. 30, 1997, Tijuana, Mexico. Most obituaries, including ''
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
'', cited her birth year as 1944. Her family was from a wealthy, assimilated,
German-Jewish The history of the Jews in Germany goes back at least to the year 321, and continued through the Early Middle Ages (5th to 10th centuries CE) and High Middle Ages (''circa'' 1000–1299 CE) when Jews, Jewish settlers founded the Ashkenazi Jews, ...
background that was
culturally Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior and Norm (social), norms found in human Society, societies, as well as the knowledge, beliefs, arts, laws, Social norm, customs, capabilities, and habits of the individuals i ...
, but not religiously Jewish. Her paternal grandmother, Florence Weill, was an Austrian Jew who had inherited a small fortune from her husband's glove-making business. Acker's grandparents went into political exile from
Alsace-Lorraine The Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (german: Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen or ; gsw-als, 's Rìchslànd Elsàss-Lothrìnga; Moselle Franconian __NOTOC__ Moselle Franconian (German ''Moselfränkisch'') is a West Central German language ...

Alsace-Lorraine
prior to World War I, due to the rising
nationalism Nationalism is an idea and movement that holds that the nation A nation is a community A community is a social unitThe term "level of analysis" is used in the social sciences to point to the location, size, or scale of a research target ...
of pre-Nazi Germany, moving to Paris and then to the United States. According to Acker, her grandparents were "first generation French-German Jews" whose ancestors originally hailed from the
Pale of Settlement The Pale of Settlement (russian: Черта́ осе́длости, '; yi, דער תּחום-המושבֿ, '; he, תְּחוּם הַמּוֹשָב, ') was a western region of the Russian Empire The Russian Empire, . commonly referred to ...
. In an interview with the magazine ''Tattoo Jew'', Acker stated that religious Judaism "means nothing to me. I don't run away from it, it just means nothing to me" and elaborated that her parents were "high-German Jews" who held cultural prejudices against Yiddish-speaking Eastern European Jews ("I was trained to run away from Polish Jews."). The pregnancy was unplanned; Donald Lehman abandoned the family before Karen's birth. Her relationship with her domineering mother even into adulthood was fraught with hostility and anxiety because Acker felt unloved and unwanted. Her mother soon remarried, to Albert Alexander, whose surname Kathy was given, although the writer later described her mother's union with Alexander as a passionless marriage to an ineffectual man. Karen (later Kathy) had a half-sister, Wendy, by her mother's second marriage, but the two women were never close and long estranged. By the time of Kathy's death, she had requested that her friends not contact Wendy, as some had suggested. Acker was raised in her mother and stepfather's home in the
Sutton PlaceSutton Place may refer to: * Sutton Place, Surrey, a country house * Sutton Place, Hackney, a Georgian terrace in London * Sutton Place, Manhattan, a neighborhood in New York City ** York Avenue and Sutton Place, the street for which the neighborhoo ...
neighborhood of Manhattan's prosperous
Upper East Side The Upper East Side, sometimes abbreviated UES, is a neighborhood in the borough A borough is an administrative division in various English language, English-speaking countries. In principle, the term ''borough'' designates a self-governing w ...

Upper East Side
. In 1978, Claire Alexander, Karen's mother, committed suicide. As an adult, Acker tried to track down her father, but abandoned her search after she discovered that her father had disappeared after killing a trespasser on his yacht and spending six months in a psychiatric asylum until the state excused him of murder charges. In 1966, she married Robert Acker, and took his surname. Robert Acker was the son of lower-middle-class Polish-Jewish immigrants. Kathy's parents had held hopes that their daughter would marry a wealthy man and did not expect the marriage to last long. Although her birth name was Karen, she was known as Kathy to her friends and family. Her first work appeared in print as part of the burgeoning New York City
literary Literature broadly is any collection of written Writing is a medium of human communication Communication (from Latin ''communicare'', meaning "to share") is the act of developing Semantics, meaning among Subject (philosophy), entitie ...

literary
underground of the mid-1970s. During the 1970s, Acker often moved back and forth between San Diego, San Francisco, and New York. She married the composer and experimental musician Peter Gordon shortly before the end of their seven-year relationship. Later, she had relationships with the theorist, publisher, and critic Sylvère Lotringer and then with the filmmaker and film theorist
Peter Wollen Peter Wollen (29 June 1938 – 17 December 2019) was a film theorist Film theory is a set of scholarly approaches within the academic discipline of film studies, film or cinema studies that began in the 1920s by questioning the formal essentiali ...
. In 1996, Acker left San Francisco and moved to London to live with the writer and music critic
Charles Shaar Murray Charles Shaar Murray (born Charles Maximillian Murray; 27 June 1951) is an English music journalist Music journalism (or music criticism) is media criticism and reporting about music topics, including popular music, classical music, and tradit ...
. She married twice. Although most of her relationships were with men, she was openly
bisexual Bisexuality is romantic Romantic may refer to: Genres and eras * The Romantic era, an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement of the 18th and 19th centuries ** Romantic music, of that era ** Romantic poetry, of that era ** R ...
. In 1979, she won the
Pushcart Prize The Pushcart Prize is an American literary prize A literary award or literary prize is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded literary piece or body of work. It is normally presented to an author An author is the creator ...
for her short story "New York City in 1979". During the early 1980s, she lived in London, where she wrote several of her most critically acclaimed works. After returning to the United States in the late 1980s, she worked as an adjunct professor at the
San Francisco Art Institute San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is a Private college, private art school, college of contemporary art in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1871, SFAI is one of the oldest art schools in the United States and the oldest west of the Missi ...

San Francisco Art Institute
for about six years and as a visiting professor at several universities, including the
University of Idaho The University of Idaho (U of I, or UIdaho) is a Public university, public Land-grant, land-grant research university in Moscow, Idaho. It is the state's land-grant and primary research university, and the lead university in the National Space Gr ...

University of Idaho
, the
University of California, San Diego The University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego or, colloquially, UCSD) is a public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organization ...
,
University of California, Santa Barbara The University of California, Santa Barbara (UC Santa Barbara or UCSB) is a Public university, public Land-grant university, land-grant research university in Santa Barbara, California, Santa Barbara-Isla Vista, California. It is part of the Uni ...
, the
California Institute of Arts The California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) is a Private university, private Art school, art university in Santa Clarita, California. It was incorporated in 1961 as the first degree-granting institution of higher learning in the US create ...
, and
Roanoke College Roanoke College is a Private university, private Liberal arts colleges in the United States, liberal arts college in Salem, Virginia. It has approximately 2,000 students who represent approximately 40 states and 30 countries. The college offers ...
.


Health and death

In April 1996, Acker was diagnosed with
breast cancer Breast cancer is cancer Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. These contrast with benign tumor A benign tumor is a mass of cells Cell most o ...

breast cancer
and she elected to have a double mastectomy. In January 1997, she wrote about her loss of faith in conventional medicine in a ''Guardian'' article, "The Gift of Disease". In the article, she explains that after unsuccessful surgery, which left her feeling physically mutilated and emotionally debilitated, she rejected the passivity of the patient in the medical mainstream and began to seek out the advice of nutritionists, acupuncturists, psychic healers, and Chinese herbalists. She found appealing the claim that instead of being an object of knowledge, as in Western medicine, the patient becomes a seer, a seeker of wisdom, that illness becomes the teacher and the patient the student. After pursuing several forms of
alternative medicine Alternative medicine is any practice that aims to achieve the healing effects of medicine, but which lacks biological plausibility and is Argument from ignorance, untested, Pseudoscience, untestable or proven ineffective. Complementary medicin ...
in England and the United States, Acker died a year and a half later, on November 30, 1997, aged 50, from complications of cancer in a
Tijuana Tijuana ( ,"Tijuana"
(US) and
) is a city in
She died in what was called "Room 101", to which her friend
Alan Moore Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer known primarily for his work in comic books A comic book, also called comic book, comic magazine or (in the United Kingdom and Ireland) simply comic, is a publication that consists o ...

Alan Moore
quipped, "There's nothing that woman can't turn into a literary reference". (Room 101, in the climax of
George Orwell Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950) known by his pen name A pen name, also called a ''nom de plume'' () or a literary double, is a pseudonym (or, in some cases, a variant form of a real name) adopted by an author and printed ...

George Orwell
's ''
Nineteen Eighty-Four ''Nineteen Eighty-Four'' (also stylised as ''1984'') is a dystopian social science fiction novel and cautionary tale written by English writer George Orwell. It was published on 8 June 1949 by Secker & Warburg as Orwell's ninth and final boo ...
'', is the basement torture chamber in which the Party attempts to subject a prisoner to his or her own worst fears.)


Education

At
Brandeis University , mottoeng = Truth even unto its innermost parts , established = , type = Private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singe ...
, she engaged in undergraduate coursework in Classics at a time when
Angela Davis Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is an American political activist, philosopher, academic and author. She is a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz The University of California, Santa Cruz (UC Santa Cruz or UCSC) ...

Angela Davis
was also at the university. She became interested in writing novels, and moved to California to attend
University of California, San Diego The University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego or, colloquially, UCSD) is a public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organization ...
, where
David Antin David Abram Antin (February 1, 1932 – October 11, 2016) was an American poet, critic and performance artist. Education and early career Antin was born in New York City in 1932. After graduating from Brooklyn Technical High School, he earned hi ...
,
Eleanor Antin Eleanor Antin (née Fineman; February 27, 1935) is an American performance art Performance art is an artwork or art exhibition created through actions executed by the artist or other participants. It may be witnessed live or through document ...
, and
Jerome Rothenberg Jerome Rothenberg (born December 11, 1931) is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America (USA), co ...
were among her teachers. She received her bachelor's degree in 1968. After moving to New York, she attended two years of graduate school at the
City University of New York The City University of New York (CUNY ) is the public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organization An organization, or organisation (E ...
in
Classics Classics or classical studies is the study of classical antiquity Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history History (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer ...

Classics
, specializing in Greek. She did not earn a graduate degree. During her time in New York, she was employed as a file clerk, secretary, stripper, and porn performer.


Literary overview

Acker was associated with the New York
punk Punk or punks may refer to: Genres, subculture, and related aspects * Punk rock Punk rock (or simply punk) is a music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arrangin ...
movement of the late 1970s and early 1980s. The punk aesthetic influenced her literary style. In the 1970s, before the term "postmodernism" was popular, Acker began writing her books. These books contain features that would eventually be considered postmodernist work. Her controversial body of work borrows heavily from the experimental styles of
William S. Burroughs William Seward Burroughs II (; February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997) was an American writer and visual artist, credited as a primary figure of the Beat Generation The Beat Generation was a literary movement started by a group ...
and
Marguerite Duras Marguerite Germaine Marie Donnadieu (, 4 April 1914 – 3 March 1996), known as Marguerite Duras (), was a French novelist, playwright, screenwriter, essayist, and experimental filmmaker. Her script for the film ''Hiroshima mon amour ''Hiroshim ...

Marguerite Duras
. Her writing strategies at times used forms of
pastiche A pastiche is a work of visual art The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is the practice of applying paint Paint is any pigmented liquid, liquefiable, or solid mastic composition that, after application to a ...

pastiche
and deployed Burroughs's
cut-up technique The cut-up technique (or ''découpé'' in French) is an aleatory Aleatoricism ( ''ey-lee-uh-TAWR-uh-siz-uhm, -TOR-, al-ee'') or aleatorism, the noun associated with the adjectival aleatory and aleatoric is a term popularised by the musical compo ...
, involving cutting-up and scrambling passages and sentences into a somewhat random remix. Acker defined her writing as existing post-
nouveau roman The Nouveau Roman (, ''new novel'') is a type of 1950s French novel that diverged from classical literary genres. Émile Henriot (writer), Émile Henriot coined the term in an article in the popular French newspaper ''Le Monde'' on May 22, 1957 t ...
European tradition. In her texts, she combines biographical elements, power, sex and violence. Indeed, critics often compare her writing to that of
Alain Robbe-Grillet Alain Robbe-Grillet (; 18 August 1922 – 18 February 2008) was a French writer and filmmaker. He was one of the figures most associated with the ''Nouveau Roman'' (new novel) trend of the 1960s, along with Nathalie Sarraute, Michel Butor and C ...

Alain Robbe-Grillet
and
Jean Genet Jean Genet (; – ) was a French novelist, playwright, poet, essayist, and political activist A political movement is a collective attempt by a group of people to change government policy Public policy is a course of action created and/or e ...
. Critics have noticed links to
Gertrude Stein Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American novelist, poet, playwright, and art collector. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh ( ) is a city in the Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English t ...

Gertrude Stein
and photographers
Cindy Sherman Cynthia Morris Sherman (born January 19, 1954) is an American artist An artist is a person engaged in an activity related to creating art Art is a diverse range of (products of) human activities Humans (''Homo sapiens'') are the m ...
and
Sherrie Levine Sherrie Levine (born 1947) is an American photographer, painter, and Conceptual art, conceptual artist. Some of her work consists of exact photographic reproductions of the work of other photographers such as Walker Evans, Eliot Porter and Edward ...

Sherrie Levine
. Acker's novels also exhibit a fascination with and an indebtedness to tattoos. She dedicated ''Empire of the Senseless'' to her tattooist. Acker published her first book, ''Politics'', in 1972. Although the collection of poems and essays did not garner much critical or public attention, it did establish her reputation within the New York punk scene. In 1973, she published her first novel (under the pseudonym Black Tarantula), ''The Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula: Some Lives of Murderesses''. The following year, she published her second novel, ''I Dreamt I Was a Nymphomaniac: Imagining''. Both works are reprinted in ''Portrait of an Eye''. In 1979, she received popular attention after winning a
Pushcart Prize The Pushcart Prize is an American literary prize A literary award or literary prize is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded literary piece or body of work. It is normally presented to an author An author is the creator ...
for her short story "New York City in 1979". She did not receive critical attention, however, until publishing ''Great Expectations'' in 1982. The opening of ''Great Expectations'' is an obvious re-writing of . It features her usual subject matter, including a semi-autobiographical account of her mother's suicide and the appropriation of several other texts, including
Pierre Guyotat Pierre Guyotat (9 January 1940 – 7 February 2020) was a French writer. Literary career Born in Bourg-Argental, Loire (department), Loire, Guyotat wrote his first novel, ''Sur un cheval'', in 1960. He was called to Algeria in the same year. In ...
's violent and sexually explicit "Eden Eden Eden". That same year, Acker published a
chapbook A chapbook is a small publication of up to about 40 pages, sometimes bound with a saddle stitch. In early modern Europe Early modern Europe, also referred to as the post-medieval period, is the period of European history The history of Eur ...

chapbook
, entitled ''Hello, I'm
Erica Jong Erica Jong (née Mann; born March 26, 1942) is an American novelist, satirist, and poet, known particularly for her 1973 novel ''Fear of Flying Fear of flying is a fear Fear is an intensely unpleasant emotion Emotions are mental st ...

Erica Jong
''. She appropriated from a number of influential writers. These writers include Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, John Keats, William Faulkner, T.S Eliot, the Brontë sisters, the Marquis de Sade, Georges Bataille, and Arthur Rimbaud. Acker wrote the script for the 1983 film ''
Variety Variety may refer to: Science and technology Mathematics * Algebraic variety, the set of solutions of a system of polynomial equations * Variety (universal algebra), classes of algebraic structures defined by equations in universal algebra Hor ...
''. Acker wrote a text on the photographer Marcus Leatherdale that was published in 1983, in an art catalogue for the Molotov Gallery in
Vienna Vienna ( ; german: Wien ; bar, Wean, label=Bavarian language, Austro-Bavarian ) is the Capital city, national capital, largest city, and one of States of Austria, nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's List of cities and towns in Austria, mos ...

Vienna
. In 1984, Acker's first British publication, the novel ''
Blood and Guts in High School ''Blood and Guts in High School'' is a novel by Kathy Acker. It was written in the late 1970s and copyrighted in 1978. It traveled a complex and circuitous route to publication, before being officially released in 1984. It remains Acker's most po ...
'' was published soon after its publication by
Grove Press Grove Press is an United States of America, American publisher, publishing imprint that was founded in 1947. Imprints include: Black Cat, Evergreen, Venus Library, and Zebra. Barney Rosset purchased the company in 1951 and turned it into an Alter ...
in New York. That same year, she was signed by Grove Press, one of the legendary independent publishers committed to controversial and avant-garde writing; she was one of the last writers taken on by
Barney Rosset Barnet Lee "Barney" Rosset, Jr. (May 28, 1922 – February 21, 2012) was the owner of the publishing house Grove Press Grove Press is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of Amer ...
before the end of his tenure there. Most of her work was published by them, including re-issues of important earlier work. She wrote for several magazines and
anthologies In book publishing Publishing is the activity of making information, literature, music, software and other content available to the public for sale or for free. Traditionally, the term refers to the distribution of printed works, such as books ...
, including the periodicals ''
RE/Search RE/Search Publications is an American magazine and book publisher, based in San Francisco, California, San Francisco, founded by its editor V. Vale in 1980. In several issues, Andrea Juno was also credited as an editor. It was the successor to Va ...
'', '' Angel Exhaust'', ''
monochrom Monochrom (stylised as monochrom) is an international art-technology-philosophy group, publishing house and film production company. It was founded in 1993, and defines itself as "an unpeculiar mixture of proto-aesthetic fringe work, pop atti ...
'' and ''Rapid Eye''. As she neared the end of her life, her work was more well-received by the conventional press; for example, ''
The Guardian ''The Guardian'' is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as ''The Manchester Guardian'', and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers ''The Observer ''The Observer'' is a British newspaper published on Sun ...

The Guardian
'' published a number of her essays, interviews, and articles, among them was an interview with the
Spice Girls The Spice Girls are a British girl group A girl group is a music act featuring several women in music, female singers who generally vocal harmony, harmonize together. The term "girl group" is also used in a narrower sense in the United States ...
. ''In Memoriam to Identity'' draws attention to popular analyses of
Rimbaud Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (, ; 20 October 1854 – 10 November 1891) was a French poet known for his transgressive and surreal themes, and his influence on Modernism, modern literature and arts, prefiguring surrealism. Born in Charleville-Mé ...

Rimbaud
's life and ''
The Sound and the Fury ''The Sound and the Fury'' is a novel by the American author William Faulkner William Cuthbert Faulkner (; September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American writer known for his novels and short stories set in the fictional Yoknapa ...
'', constructing or revealing social and literary identity. Although known in the
literary Literature broadly is any collection of written Writing is a medium of human communication Communication (from Latin ''communicare'', meaning "to share") is the act of developing Semantics, meaning among Subject (philosophy), entitie ...
world for creating a whole new style of feminist prose and for her
transgressive fiction Transgressive fiction is a genre of literature which focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who break free of those confines in unusual or illicit ways. Literary context Because they are rebelling ag ...
, she was also a
punk Punk or punks may refer to: Genres, subculture, and related aspects * Punk rock Punk rock (or simply punk) is a music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arrangin ...
and feminist icon for her devoted portrayals of
subculture A subculture is a group of people within a culture Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior and Norm (social), norms found in human Society, societies, as well as the knowledge, beliefs, arts, laws, Social norm, ...
s, strong-willed women, and violence. Notwithstanding the increased recognition she got for ''Great Expectations'', ''
Blood and Guts in High School ''Blood and Guts in High School'' is a novel by Kathy Acker. It was written in the late 1970s and copyrighted in 1978. It traveled a complex and circuitous route to publication, before being officially released in 1984. It remains Acker's most po ...
'' is often considered Acker's breakthrough work. Published in 1984, it is one of her most extreme explorations of sexuality and violence. Borrowing from, among other texts,
Nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was an American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer. His works often focus on history, morality, and religion. He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts Salem ( ) is a historic ...

Nathaniel Hawthorne
's ''
The Scarlet Letter ''The Scarlet Letter: A Romance'' is a work of historical fiction by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850. Set in Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony during the years 1642 to 1649, the novel tells the story of Hester Prynne, who co ...
'', ''Blood and Guts'' details the experiences of Janey Smith, a sex-addicted and
pelvic inflammatory disease Pelvic inflammatory disease, also known as pelvic inflammatory disorder (PID), is an infection An infection is the invasion of an organism's body by , their multiplication, and the reaction of tissues to the infectious agents and the s th ...
-ridden urbanite who is in love with a father who sells her into slavery. Many critics criticized it for being demeaning toward women, and Germany banned it completely. Acker published the German court judgment against ''
Blood and Guts in High School ''Blood and Guts in High School'' is a novel by Kathy Acker. It was written in the late 1970s and copyrighted in 1978. It traveled a complex and circuitous route to publication, before being officially released in 1984. It remains Acker's most po ...
'' in
Hannibal Lecter, My Father
'. Acker published ''Empire of the Senseless'' in 1988, and considered it a turning point in her writing. While she still borrows from other texts, including
Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), known by his pen name A pen name, also called a ''nom de plume'' () or a literary double, is a pseudonym A pseudonym () (originally: ψευδώνυμος in Greek) or ...

Mark Twain
's ''
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn ''Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'' (or, as it is known in more recent editions, ''The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'') is a novel by American author Mark Twain, which was first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United ...
'', the appropriation is less obvious. However, one of Acker's more controversial appropriations is from
William Gibson William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948) is an American-Canadian speculative fiction Speculative fiction is a broad category of fiction encompassing genres with elements that do not exist in reality, recorded history, nature, or the presen ...

William Gibson
's 1984 text, ''
Neuromancer ''Neuromancer'' is a 1984 science fiction Science fiction (sometimes shortened to sci-fi or SF) is a genre of speculative fiction which typically deals with imagination, imaginative and futuristic concepts such as advanced science and tech ...
'', in which Acker equates code with the female body and its militaristic implications. In 1988, she published ''Literal Madness: Three Novels'', which included three previously-published works: ''Florida'' deconstructs and reduces
John Huston John Marcellus Huston ( ; August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director, screenwriter, actor, and visual artist. He travelled widely, settling at various times in France, Mexico, and Ireland. Huston was a citizen of th ...
's 1948
film noir Film noir (; ) is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood Hollywood is a neighborhood A neighbourhood (British English British English (BrE) is the standard dialect of the English language Englis ...
''
Key Largo Key Largo ( es, Cayo Largo) is an island in the upper Florida Keys The Florida Keys are a coral island, coral cay archipelago located off the southern coast of Florida, forming the southernmost part of the continental United States. They b ...
'' into its base sexual politics, ''Kathy Goes to Haiti'' details a young woman's relationship and sexual exploits while on vacation, and ''My Death My Life by
Pier Paolo Pasolini Pier Paolo Pasolini (; 5 March 1922 – 2 November 1975) was an Italian film director, poet, writer, and intellectual, who also distinguished himself as an actor, journalist, novelist, playwright, and political figure. He remains a controversial ...

Pier Paolo Pasolini
'' provides a fictional ''autobiography'' of the Italian filmmaker in which he solves his own murder. Between 1990 and 1993, she published four more books: ''In Memoriam to Identity'' (1990); ''Hannibal Lecter, My Father'' (1991); ''Portrait of an Eye: Three Novels'' (1992), also composed of already-published works; and ''My Mother: Demonology'' (1992). Her last novel, ''Pussy, King of the Pirates'', was published in 1996, which she,
Rico Bell Rico Bell ( Eric Bellis) is a United Kingdom, UK and California based artist and musician best known for his work as a member of the British punk rock band the Mekons which he joined in 1983. A singer and multi-instrumentalist with the Mekons, Bell ...
, and the rest of rock band
the Mekons The Mekons are a British post-punk Post-punk (originally called new musick) is a broad genre Genre () is any form or type of communication Communication (from Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Itali ...
also reworked into an operetta, which they performed at the
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago A museum ( ; plural museums or, rarely, musea) is a building or institution that cares for and displays a collection Collection or Collections may refer to: * Cash collection, the function of an accounts receivable department * Collec ...

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
, in 1997. In 2007, Amandla Publishing re-published Acker's articles that she wrote for the ''
New Statesman The ''New Statesman'' is a British political Politics (from , ) is the set of activities that are associated with Decision-making, making decisions in Social group, groups, or other forms of Power (social and political), power relations bet ...
'' from 1989 to 1991.
Grove Press Grove Press is an United States of America, American publisher, publishing imprint that was founded in 1947. Imprints include: Black Cat, Evergreen, Venus Library, and Zebra. Barney Rosset purchased the company in 1951 and turned it into an Alter ...
published two unpublished early novellas in the volume ''Rip-Off Red, Girl Detective and The Burning Bombing of America'', and a collection of selected work, ''Essential Acker'', edited by Amy Scholder and
Dennis Cooper Dennis or Denis is a first or last name from the Greco-Roman name Dionysius, via one of the Saint Dionysius (disambiguation), Christian saints named Dionysius. The name came from Dionysus, the Classical mythology, Greek god of ecstatic states, ...

Dennis Cooper
in 2002. Three volumes of her non-fiction have been published and republished since her death. In 2002,
New York University New York University (NYU) is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of ne ...
staged ''Discipline and Anarchy'', a retrospective exhibition of her works, while in 2008, London's
Institute of Contemporary Arts An institute is an organisation An organization, or organisation (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth English; American and British English spelling differences#-ise, -ize (-isation, -ization), see spelling differences), ...
screened an evening of films influenced by Acker.


Posthumous reputation

A collection of essays on Acker's work, titled ''Lust for Life: On the Writings of Kathy Acker'', edited by Carla Harryman, Avital Ronell, and Amy Scholder, was published by
Verso ''Recto'' is the "right" or "front" side and ''verso'' is the "left" or "back" side when text is written or printed on a leaf of paper () in a bound item such as a codex The codex (plural codices ()) was the historical ancestor of the mod ...

Verso
in 2006 and includes essays by
Nayland Blake Nayland Blake is an American artist An artist is a person engaged in an activity related to creating art, practicing the arts, or demonstrating an art. The common usage in both everyday speech and academic discourse refers to a practitioner in th ...

Nayland Blake
,
Leslie Dick Leslie Dick (born 1954) is an American artist, writer, editor, and educator, based in Los Angeles. Her work explores feminist themes, especially in relation to queer theory and Lacanian discourse. Dick has published two novels, a collection of shor ...
, Robert Glück, Carla Harryman, Laurence Rickels, Avital Ronell, Barrett Watten, and
Peter Wollen Peter Wollen (29 June 1938 – 17 December 2019) was a film theorist Film theory is a set of scholarly approaches within the academic discipline of film studies, film or cinema studies that began in the 1920s by questioning the formal essentiali ...
. In 2009, the first collection of essays to focus on academic study of Acker, ''Kathy Acker and Transnationalism'' was published. In 2015, Semiotext(e) published ''I'm Very Into You'', a book of Acker's email correspondence with media theorist McKenzie Wark, edited by Matias Viegener, her executor and head of the Kathy Acker Literary Trust. Her personal library is housed in a reading room at the University of Cologne in Germany, and her papers are divided between NYU's Fales Library and the Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. A limited body of her recorded readings and discussions of her works exists in the special collections archive of
University of California, San Diego The University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego or, colloquially, UCSD) is a public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organization ...
. In 2013, the Acker Award was launched and named for Kathy Acker. Awarded to living and deceased members of the San Francisco or New York avant-garde art scene, the award is financed by Alan Kaufman and Clayton Patterson. In 2017, American writer and artist Chris Kraus (American writer), Chris Kraus published ''After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography'', the first book-length biography of Acker's life experiences and literary strategies. American writer Douglas A. Martin published ''Acker''. a book-length study of Acker's influences and artistic trajectory. In 2018, British writer Olivia Laing published ''Crudo'', a novel which references Acker's works and life, and whose main character is a woman called Kathy, suffering double breast cancer; yet book's events are situated in August–September 2017. In 2019, Amy Scholder and Douglas A. Martin co-edited ''Kathy Acker: The Last Interview and Other Conversations''. Kate Zambreno wrote on Kathy Acker in her essay "New York City, Summer 2013" published as part of the collectio
''Screen Tests''
(Harpers Collins, 2019). The essay was originally published in
Icon
' edited b
Amy Scholder
(Feminist Press, 2014). Between May 1, 2019 and August 4, 2019, the exhibition ''I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker'' was held at the
Institute of Contemporary Arts An institute is an organisation An organization, or organisation (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth English; American and British English spelling differences#-ise, -ize (-isation, -ization), see spelling differences), ...
, London. The exhibition featured works by more than 40 artists, such as Reza Abdoh, Johanna Hedva and Reba Maybury. In 2020,
Grove Press Grove Press is an United States of America, American publisher, publishing imprint that was founded in 1947. Imprints include: Black Cat, Evergreen, Venus Library, and Zebra. Barney Rosset purchased the company in 1951 and turned it into an Alter ...
issued a new edition of
Portrait of an Eye
', with an introduction by Kate Zambreno.


Bibliography


Novels, stories

* ''Politics'' (1972; excerpts published in ''Hannibal Lecter, My Father'' (1991); full text published in ''Kathy Acker (1971-1975)'' (2019) * ''The Burning Bombing of America: The Destruction of the United States'' (pub. 2002, from manuscript 1972) * ''Rip-Off Red, Girl Detective'' (pub. 2002, from manuscript 1973) * ''Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula By the Black Tarantula'' (1973) * ''I Dreamt I Was a Nymphomaniac: Imagining'' (1974) * ''Haiti: A Trip to the Voodoo Doctor'' (''Travelers Digest'' Issue 1, Volume 1, 1977; later published in ''Kathy Goes to Haiti'') * ''Adult Life of Toulouse Lautrec'' (1978) * ''Florida'' (1978) * ''Kathy Goes To Haiti'' (1978) * ''The Seattle Book: For Randy and Heather'' (1980, with illustrations) * ''The Persian Poems by Janey Smith'' (''Travelers Digest'' Issue 2, Volume 1, ed. Jeff Goldberg, 1980; poems from ''Blood and Guts in High School'', with drawings by Robert Kushner, 1980) * ''N.Y.C. in 1979'' (1981) * ''Hello, My Name Is Erica Jong'' (1982; also available in ''Blood and Guts in High School'') * ''Translations of the Diaries of Laure the Schoolgirl'' (1983) * ''Implosion'' (1983; also available in ''My Death My Life by Pier Paolo Pasolini'') * ''Great Expectations'' (1983) * ''Algeria : A Series of Invocations Because Nothing Else Works'' (1984) * ''My Death My Life by Pier Paolo Pasolini'' (1984) * ''
Blood and Guts in High School ''Blood and Guts in High School'' is a novel by Kathy Acker. It was written in the late 1970s and copyrighted in 1978. It traveled a complex and circuitous route to publication, before being officially released in 1984. It remains Acker's most po ...
'' (1984) * ''Don Quixote: Which Was a Dream'' (1986) * ''Lust: A Sailor's Slight Identity'' (1987, available in ''Hannibal Lecter, My Father'') * ''Literal Madness: Three Novels'' (Reprinted 1987; contains ''Kathy Goes to Haiti'', ''My Death My Life by Pier Paolo Pasolini'', ''Florida'') * ''Young Lust'' (1988; contains ''Kathy Goes to Haiti'', ''The Adult Life of Toulouse Lautrec by Henri Toulouse Lautrec'', and ''Florida'') * ''Empire of the Senseless'' (1988) * ''In Memoriam to Identity'' (1990) * ''Hannibal Lecter, My Father'' (1991) * ''Portrait of an Eye'' (1992, includes early novels ''Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula By the Black Tarantula'' (1973); ''I Dreamt I Was a Nymphomaniac: Imagining'' (1974); ''Adult Life of Toulouse Lautrec'' (1978) * ''My Mother: Demonology'' (1994) * ''Pussycat Fever'' (with Diane Dimassa and Freddie Baer, illustrators, 1995) * ''Pussy, King of the Pirates'' (1996) * ''Portrait of an Eye: Three Novels'' (Reprinted 1998) * ''Eurydice in the Underworld'' (1998) * ''Essential Acker: The Selected Writings of Kathy Acker'' (2002) * ''New York City in 1979'' (2018, Penguin Modern) * ''Kathy Acker (1971–1975)'' (2019, Éditions Ismael, 656 pgs.), ed. Justin Gajoux and Claire Finch, critical edition of unpublished early writings from 1971 to 1975 Some of the contents from * ''Kathy Acker (1971-1975)'' (2019, Éditions Ismael, 656 pgs.), ed. Justin Gajoux and Claire Finch, critical edition of unpublished early writings from 1971 to 1975 * ''The Golden Woman'' (poem, 1969''–''1970) * ''Section from DIARY'' (1-2, 1971) * ''Portraits'' (7, 1971) * ''Portraits and Visions'' (summer 1971) * ''Diary Warmcatfur'' (1, 1972) * ''Politics'' (1972, full text) * ''For H.'' (1972) * ''Revolutionary Diary of an Anarchist'' (1972) * ''Journal Black Cats Black Jewels'' (summer 1972) * ''Gold Songs for Jimi Hendrix'' (1972) * ''Breaking Up'' (summer 1972) * ''[Letter to Berndadette Mayer]'' (fall 1972) * ''Entrance into Dwelling in Paradise'' (poems, fall 1972) * ''[Exercises]'' (fall 1972) * ''Stripper Disintergration'' (2-3, 1973) * ''Section from Diary'' (3, 1973) * ''[Letter to Bernadette Mayer]'' (1973) * ''The Beginning of the Thesmophoriazusae'' (7-9, 1973) * ''Part I of Breaking Through Memories into Desire'' (11, 1973) * ''Part II [of Breaking Through Memories...]'' (1, 1974) * ''Conversations'' (1, 1974) * ''[Letters to Alan Sondheim]'' (2-3, 1974) * ''[Letter to Bernadette Mayer]'' (3/3/1974)


Poetry

This is not a complete list. This symbol # indicates published in ''Kathy Acker (1971–1975)'' (2019, Éditions Ismael, 656 pgs.), ed. Justin Gajoux and Claire Finch, critical edition of unpublished early writings from 1971 to 1975 * ''The Golden Woman'' (poem, 1969''–''1970) # * ''Journal Black Cats Black Jewels'' (summer 1972) # * ''Gold Songs for Jimi Hendrix'' (1972) # * ''Part I of Breaking Through Memories into Desire'' (11, 1973) # * ''Part II [of Breaking Through Memories...]'' (1, 1974) # * ''Baby don't give baby don't get'' (from the novel ''Florida'') * ''Homage to Leroi Jones'' (poems, pub. 2015 by Lost and Found: The CUNY Poetics Documents Initiative, from manuscript 1972)
Discussion/reading of two poems from the novel ''Blood and Guts in High School''


Stage work

* ''Desire'' (''Bomb'' 3, spring 1982) * ''Lulu Unchained'' (drama, 1985, first performed at ICA; available in the novel ''Don Quixote: Which Was a Dream'') * ''The Birth of the Poet'' (drama, 1981; performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 1985, directed by Richard Foreman; published in ''Eurydice in the Underworld''; also in ''Wordplays 5: An Anthology of New American Drama'', 1987) * ''Requiem'' (drama, 1997; published in ''Eurydice in the Underworld'')


Screenplay

* ''Variety'' (screenplay, 1985, directed by Bette Gordon; unpublished)


Recordings, music collabs

* ''Pussy'' (1994, produced by CodeX; contains two sections, ''O and Ange'' and ''Pussy, King of the Pirates: Her Story'') * ''The Stabbing Hand'' (1995) – spoken-word guest appearance on alternate mix of song by Oxbow (band), Oxbow, included on reissues of album ''Let Me Be a Woman (album), Let Me Be a Woman'' * ''Pussy, King of the Pirates'' (1997, Touch and Go Records) - Acker's operetta, performed and recorded by the Mekons with Kathy Acker * ''Redoing Childhood'' (2000) spoken-word recording, Kill Rock Stars, KRS 349.


Essays (periodicals, book reviews, movie reviews, art reviews, speeches, and other texts)

This is not a complete list. The symbols ^^ indicate it's available at Duke University's collection of Kathy Acker's papers. The symbol # indicates the essay is included in the Kathy Acker collection ''Bodies of Work: Essays'' (London: Serpent's Tail, 1997). * ''Notes on Writing from the Life of Baudelaire'' (1979^^) * ''New York City 1983'' (from ''Marcus Leatherdale: His photographs – a book in a series on people and years'', with Christian Michelides, published by Wien, Molotov, 1983) * ''Realism for the Cause of Future Revolution'' (from ''Art After Modernism: Rethinking Representation'', 1984#) * ''Collette'' (1985#) * ''An Actual Institution of Art'' (1986^^) * Introduction to collection ''Young Lust'' (1988) * Introduction to ''Boxcar Bertha'' (1988#) * ''A Few Notes on Two of my Books'' (from ''Review of Contemporary Fiction'', vol 9, no. 3, Fall 1989#) * ''Blue Valentine'' (1989^^) * ''Review of Scandal for Weiner'' (1989^^) * ''Low: Good and Evil in the Work of Nayland Blake'' (1990) A selection is available in the Kathy Acker collection ''Body of Works: Essays''. * ''The World According to Peter Greenway'' (from ''The Village Voice'', vol. 35, April 17, 1990#) * ''In the Underworld'' (1990^^) * ''William Burroughs' Realism'' (1990) * ''From Counter-Culture to Culture, But Here's no Culture/Fuck Ecology and the Death of Communism/The Meaning of the 80s'' (1990^^) * ''New York City 25/12/89-31/12/89 at the Edge of the New'' (1990^^) * ''The Language of Sex The Sex of Language'' (1990) * ''Critical Languages'' (1990#)
''Dead Doll Humility''
(1990). * ''The Meaning of the Eighties'' (from ''The Village Voice'', vol. 35, January 2, 1990#) * ''Bodybuilding'' (1991) * ''The War at Home: Bonfire of the Vanities by Brian de Palma'' (1991^^) * ''Red Wings: Concerning Richard Prince's "Spiritual America"'' (from ''Parkett'', 1992#)
''Against Ordinary Language: The Language of the Body''
(from ''The Last Sex: Feminism and Outlaw Bodies'', 1993#) * ''Reading the Lack of the Body: The Writing of the Marquis de Sade'' (from ''The Divine Sade'', 1994#) * ''After the End of the Art World'' (1994^^) * ''Statements on the Nature of Musical Comedy'' (1994^^) * ''Seeing Gender'' (from ''Critical Quarterly'', 1995#) * ''Running through the World: On the Art of Kiki Smith'' (1995^^) * ''Mirror: Two Works of Art'' (1995^^) * ''Moving Into Wonder'' (An introduction to ''Time Capsule: A Concise Encyclopedia by Women Artists'', 1995#) * Unidentified contribution to ''Dust: Essays'' (1995) * ''Writing, Identity, and Copyright in the Net Age'' (from ''MMLA'', vol. 28, no. 1, Spring 1995#) * ''Samuel Delaney: Orpheus'' (1996^^) * ''On Delany the Magiian'' (Foreword to ''Trouble on Triton'', 1996#) * ''The Future'' (1997#) * ''The Gift of the Disease'' (''The Guardian'', January 18, 1997) * ''Bruce Willis and Me'' (1997^^) * ''Bodies of Work: Essays'' (1997). Includes a preface. Any essay with symbol # indicates it is included in this collection. * ''Acker: Articles from The New Statesman 1989-1991'' (2007, Amandla Publishing) * ''Russian Constructivism'' (from ''Blasted Allegories'') (date unknown#) * Notes on a title page of Herman Melville'
''White Jacket''
(Undated) * ''Some American Cities'' (from ''Marxism Today'') (date unknown#) * ''Postmoderism'' (undated #) * ''About Robert Mapplethorpe'' (undated^^) * ''Allen Ginsberg: A Personal Portrait'' (undated^^) * ''A Bunch of Propositions about the Hernandez Brothers'' (undated^^) * ''On Twin Peaks'' (undated^^) * ''Women who have Big Muscles'' (undated^^) * ''The End of Poetry'' (undated^^) * ''Eugenie De Franval'' (undated^^) * ''Fabre's Work or Opera'' (undated^^)
Unidentified essay
part of the Iain Sinclair inventory. Book reviews - typescripts of sixteen different reviews from 1985 to 1989 - available at Duke University's collection of Kathy Acker papers.


Interviews and conversations

This is not a complete list. * Interview with Barry Alpert (Mitali Restaurant, pub. in ''Only Paper Today'', March 30, 1976) Published in ''The Last Interview''.
"Kathy Acker by Mark Margill"
(pub. in ''BOMB'' Magazine, July 1, 1983) * Informal Interview (with R.J. Ellish, Carolyn Bird, Dawn Curwen, Ian Mancor, Val Ogden, and Charles Patrick, April 23, 1986) Published in ''The Last Interview''.
Kathy Acker at the ICA
(Part of the Anthony Rolland Collection of Films and Art, Writers in Conversation, 1986) * ''A Conversation with Kathy Acker'' (with Ellen G. Friedman, Gramercy Park Hotel, NYC, 1 February 1988) Pub. in ''Review of Contemporary Fiction'' 9, No. 3 (Fall 1989): 12-22. * Conversations with Dean Kulpers (Gramercy Park Hotel Bar, NYC, July 2, 1988). Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''Devoured by Myths: An Interview with Sylvere Lotringer'' (New York, Oct 1989 – May 1990, published in ''Hannibal Lecter My Father'') The unexpurgated transcript was published in ''The Last Interview''. * "An interview with Kathy Acker" (with Larry McCaffery, pub. in ''Mississippi Review'' 20, Nos. 1-2 (1991): 83-97). * ''The On Our Backs Interview: Kathy Acker'' (with Lisa Palac, May/June 1991). Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''Kathy Acker Interviewed by Rebecca Deaton'' (pub. in ''Textual Practice'' 6, No. 2 (Summer 1992): 271-82.
''Body Building''
(with Laurence A. Rikels, pub. in ''Artforum'', February 1994). Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''Can't: Walk and chew gum'' (with Ricahrd Kadrey, from Covert Culture series, pub. in ''Hotwired'' online, 13 September 1995) * ''Kathy Acker'' (in conversation with Beth Jackson, pub. in ''eyeline'', Autumn/Winter 1996). Published in ''The Last Interview''. * Strange Gaze interview with Anton Corbijn (1996, source unknown, available at Duke University's collection of Kathy Acker's papers) * ''All Girls Together: Kathy Acker Interviews the Spice Girls'' (pub. ''The Guardian'', 1997) Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''The Last Interview'' (with Kesia Boddy, 1997) Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''Candle in the Wind'' (interviewed by Ruben Reyes, ''Phsycus Room'', Issue 3, Summer 1998) * ''Kathy Acker'' (with Andrea Juno and V. Vale, pub. in ''Angry Women'' (RE/Search, 1991: June Books, 1999). Published in ''The Last Interview''. * ''Pussy and the Art of Motor Cycle Maintenance or how to be a pirate on-line and channel your energies so as to remember your dreams...'' (interviewed by Rosie X, date/magazine unknown) * ''Kathy Acker Where does she get off?'' (interviewed by R.U. Sirius, date/magazine unknown) * interview with Karl Schieder (July 25, 1991, The Naropa Institute, Boulder, Colorado, pub. in ilato.org, pubdate unknown) * ''A Conversation with Kathy Acker'' (interviewed by Benjamin Bratton (''Speed''), pub. in ''Apparatus and Memory'', date unknown)
Kathy Acker interviews William S. Burroughs
(date unknown) * Kathy Acker and British astrologer discuss Kathy Acker's astrology chart (date unknown)


Correspondence

This is not a complete list. * ''Spread Open'', with artist Paul Buck. Incorporates correspondence between Kathy Acker and Buck from early 80s. Published in 2005 by Dis Voir. * ''I'm Very Into You''. A book of Acker's email correspondence with media theorist McKenzie Wark, edited by Matias Viegener, her executor and head of the Kathy Acker Literary Trust. Pub. in 2015, by Semiotext(e).


See also

* Postmodern feminism


References


Further reading

* "no one can find little girls any more: Kathy Acker in Australia" (1997). Documentary film by Jonathan and Felicity Dawson. Griffith University, 90 minutes. Footage from this film is included i
Who's Afraid of Kathy Acker? A documentary by Barbara Caspar
* ''Devouring Institutions: The Life Work of Kathy Acker'', ed. Michael Hardin (Hyperbole/San Diego State University Press: 2004)

* ''Lust for Life: On the Writings of Kathy Acker'', ed. Carla Harryman, Avital Ronell, and Amy Scholder (Verso, 2006) * ''Kathy Acker and Transnationalism'', ed. Polina Mackay and Kathryn Nicol (Cambridge Scholars, 2009) * ''I'm Very into You: Correspondence 1995--1996'', by Kathy Acker and McKenzie Wark, edited by Matias Viegener (Semiotext(e), 2017) * ''After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography'', by Chris Kraus (Semiotext(e), 2017) * Pérez, Rolando
"What is Don Quijote/Don Quixote And…And…And the Disjunctive Synthesis of Cervantes and Kathy Acker"
Cervantes ilimitado: cuatrocientos años del Quijote. Ed. Nuria Morgado. ALDEEU, 2016. pp. 75–100.


External links

* *
Part 2
' ·
Part 3
' * * Acker interview with the
Spice Girls The Spice Girls are a British girl group A girl group is a music act featuring several women in music, female singers who generally vocal harmony, harmonize together. The term "girl group" is also used in a narrower sense in the United States ...
. * * * * * *
"Kathy Acker Papers, 1972–1997 and undated", at Duke University
{{DEFAULTSORT:Acker, Kathy 1947 births 1997 deaths 20th-century American novelists 20th-century American poets 20th-century American women writers American people of Austrian-Jewish descent American people of French-Jewish descent American people of German-Jewish descent American essayists American women essayists American women novelists American women poets Bisexual feminists Bisexual women Bisexual writers Brandeis University alumni City University of New York alumni Deaths from breast cancer Deaths from cancer in Mexico American feminist writers Jewish American novelists Jewish feminists Jewish women writers Kill Rock Stars LGBT Jews American LGBT novelists LGBT people from New York (state) American LGBT poets Obscenity controversies in literature Outlaw poets People from the Upper East Side Postmodern feminists Postmodern writers Punk writers Roanoke College people San Francisco Art Institute faculty Sex-positive feminists University of California, San Diego alumni Writers from Manhattan Novelists from New York (state) Age controversies 20th-century essayists Secular Jews Bisexual academics