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The Juilliard School () is a
private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly two decades from the charts. Both "In Pri ...
performing arts The performing arts are arts such as music, dance, and drama which are performed for an audience. It is different from visual arts The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is the practice of applying paint Paint is ...
conservatory in
New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of ...

New York City
. Established in 1905, the school trains about 850 undergraduate and graduate students in
dance Dance is a performing art art form, form consisting of sequences of movement, either improvised or purposefully selected. This movement has aesthetic and often symbolism (arts), symbolic value. Dance can be categorized and described by its ...

dance
,
drama Drama is the specific Mode (literature), mode of fiction Mimesis, represented in performance: a Play (theatre), play, opera, mime, ballet, etc., performed in a theatre, or on Radio drama, radio or television.Elam (1980, 98). Considered as a ...

drama
, and
music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elements such as (which governs and ), (and its associated concepts , , and ...

music
. It is widely regarded as one of the world's leading drama, music, and dance schools.


History

In 1905, the Institute of Musical Art, Juilliard's predecessor institution, was founded on the premise that the United States did not have a premier music school and too many students were going to Europe to study music. In 1919, a wealthy textile merchant named Augustus Juilliard died and left the school in his will the largest single bequest for the advancement of music at that time. In 1968, the school's name was changed from the Juilliard School of Music to The Juilliard School to reflect its broadened mission to educate musicians, directors, and actors. The Institute of Musical Art opened in the former Lenox Mansion,
Fifth Avenue Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare A thoroughfare is a primary passage or way as a transit route through regularly trafficked areas whether by road A road is a thoroughfare, route, or way on land between two Location (geography), places ...

Fifth Avenue
and 12th Street, on October 11, 1905. It moved in 1910 to 120
Claremont Avenue Claremont Avenue is a short avenue in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan Manhattan (), known regionally as the City and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, is the most densely populated of the five boroughs of N ...
in the
Morningside Heights Morningside Heights is a neighborhood A neighbourhood (British English British English (BrE) is the standard dialect of the English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in Histor ...

Morningside Heights
neighborhood of Manhattan, onto a property purchased from
Bloomingdale Insane Asylum The Bloomingdale Insane Asylum (1821–1889) was a private hospital for the care of the mentally ill, founded by New York Hospital. It was in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan Manhattan (), known regionally as the City and the ...
near the
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a in . Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of in , Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in and ...

Columbia University
campus. In 1920, the Juilliard Foundation was created, named after textile merchant , who bequeathed a substantial amount of money for the advancement of music in the United States. In 1924, the foundation purchased the
Vanderbilt family The Vanderbilt family is an American family of Dutch Dutch commonly refers to: * Something of, from, or related to the Netherlands * Dutch people () * Dutch language () *Dutch language , spoken in Belgium (also referred as ''flemish'') Dutch ma ...
guesthouse at 49 E.
52nd Street 52nd Street is a -long one-way street traveling west to east across Midtown Manhattan Midtown Manhattan is the central portion of the boroughs of New York City, New York City borough of Manhattan. Midtown is home to some of the city's most ...
, and established the Juilliard Graduate School. In 1926, the Juilliard School of Music was created through a merger of the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School. The two schools shared a common board of directors and president (
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a in . Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of in , Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in and ...

Columbia University
professor
John ErskineJohn Erskine may refer to: *John Erskine of Dun (1509–1591), Superintendent of Angus and Mearns, Scotland, and Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland *John Erskine (Scottish politician) (1660–1733), MP for Stirling Burghs *Jo ...
) but retained their distinct identities. The conductor and music-educator
Frank Damrosch Frank Heino Damrosch (June 22, 1859 – October 22, 1937) was a German-born American music conductor and educator. In 1905, Damrosch founded the New York Institute of Musical Art, a predecessor of the Juilliard School The Juilliard School () i ...

Frank Damrosch
continued as the Institute's dean, and the Australian pianist and composer
Ernest Hutcheson Ernest Hutcheson (20 July 1871 – 9 February 1951) was an Australian pianist, composer and teacher. Biography Hutcheson was born in Melbourne, and toured there as a child prodigy at the age of five. He later travelled to Leipzig and entered t ...

Ernest Hutcheson
was appointed dean of the Graduate School. In 1937, Hutcheson succeeded Erskine as president of the two institutions, a job he held until 1945. In 1946, the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School completely merged to form a single institution. The president of the school at that time was
William Schuman William Howard Schuman (August 4, 1910February 15, 1992) was an American composer and Arts administration, arts administrator. Life Schuman was born into a Jewish family in Manhattan, New York City, son of Samuel and Rachel Schuman. He was named ...
, the first winner of the
Pulitzer Prize for Music The Pulitzer Prize for Music is one of seven Pulitzer Prizes The Pulitzer Prize () is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature and musical composition within the United States. It was established in 191 ...
. Schuman established the
Juilliard String Quartet The Juilliard String Quartet is a classical music Classical music generally refers to the formal musical tradition of the Western world The Western world, also known as the West, refers to various regions, nations and state (polity), ...

Juilliard String Quartet
in 1946 and the Dance Division in 1951, under the direction of
Martha Hill Martha Hill (December 1, 1900 – November 19, 1995) was one of the most influential United States, American dance instructors in history. She was the first Director of Dance at the Juilliard School, and held that position for almost 35 year ...
.William Schuman graduated from Columbia's Teachers College (BS 1935, MA 1937) and attended the Juilliard Summer School in 1932, 1933 and 1936. While attending Juilliard Summer School, he developed a personal dislike for traditional music theory and ear training curricula, finding little value in counterpoint and dictation. Soon after being appointed as president of the Juilliard School of Music in 1945, William Schuman created a new curriculum called the ''Literature and Materials of Music'' (L&M), designed for composers to teach. L&M was a reaction against more formal theory and ear training, and as a result did not have a formal structure. The general mandate was "to give the student an awareness of the dynamic nature of the materials of music." The quality and degree of each student's education in harmony, music history, or ear training was dependent on how each composer-teacher decided to interpret this mandate.William Schuman resigned as president of Juilliard after being elected president of Lincoln Center in 1962.
Peter Mennin Peter Mennin (born Mennini) (May 17, 1923 in Erie, Pennsylvania – June 17, 1983 in New York City New York City (NYC), often simply called New York, is the List of United States cities by population, most populous city in the United ...
, another composer with directorial experience at the
Peabody Conservatory Peabody Institute, East Mount Vernon Place, c. 1902 The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) is a music and dance conservatory and university-preparatory school A college-preparatory school (shortened to preparatory scho ...
, was elected as his successor. Mennin made significant changes to the L&M program—ending ear training and music history and hiring the well known pedagogue Renée Longy to teach
solfège In music, solfège (, ; ) or solfeggio (; ), also called sol-fa, solfa, solfeo, among many names, is a music education Music education is a field of practice in which educators are trained for careers as primary education, elementary or seconda ...
. In 1968, Mennin hired
John Houseman John Houseman (born Jacques Haussmann; September 22, 1902 – October 31, 1988) was a Romanian-born British-American actor and producer of theatre, film, and television. He became known for his highly publicized collaboration with director ...

John Houseman
to manage a new Drama Division, and in 1969 oversaw Juilliard's relocation from Claremont Avenue to Lincoln Center. The School's name was changed to The Juilliard School to reflect its broadened mission to educate musicians, directors, and actors. Dr. Joseph W. Polisi became president of Juilliard in 1984 after Peter Mennin died. Polisi's many accomplishments include philanthropic successes, broadening of the curriculum and establishment of dormitories for Juilliard's students. In 2001, the school established a
jazz Jazz is a music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arranging sounds in time to produce a composition through the elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre ...
performance training program. In September 2005,
Colin Davis Sir Colin Rex Davis (25 September 1927 – 14 April 2013) was an English conductor, known for his association with the London Symphony Orchestra, having first conducted it in 1959. His repertoire was broad, but among the composers with whom he ...
conducted an orchestra that combined students from the Juilliard and London's
Royal Academy of Music The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) in London London is the and of and the . It stands on the in south-east England at the head of a down to the , and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The , its ancient core and financial ...

Royal Academy of Music
at the BBC Proms, and during 2008 the Juilliard Orchestra embarked on a successful tour of China, performing concerts as part of the
Cultural Olympiad Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior Social behavior is behavior Behavior (American English) or behaviour (British English; American and British English spelling differences#-our, -or, see spelling differ ...
in Beijing,
Suzhou Suzhou (; ; , Mandarin Mandarin may refer to: * Mandarin (bureaucrat), a bureaucrat of Imperial China (the original meaning of the word) ** by extension, any senior government bureaucrat A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy and c ...

Suzhou
, and Shanghai under the expert leadership of Maestro Xian Zhang. In 1999, the Juilliard School was awarded the
National Medal of Arts The National Medal of Arts is an award and title created by the United States Congress The United States Congress is the legislature of the federal government of the United States. It is Bicameralism, bicameral, comprising a lower body, ...
. In 2006, Juilliard received a trove of precious music manuscripts from board chair and philanthropist
Bruce Kovner Bruce Stanley Kovner (born 1945) is an American investor, hedge fund manager, and philanthropist. He is Chairman of CAM Capital, which he established in January 2012 to manage his investment, trading and business activities. From 1983 through 2011 ...
. The collection includes autograph scores, sketches, composer-emended proofs and first editions of major works by
Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27 January 17565 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart, was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical periodClassical period may refer to: *Classical Greece, speci ...

Mozart
,
Bach Johann Sebastian Bach (28 July 1750) was a German composer and musician of the late Baroque period The Baroque (, ; ) is a style Style is a manner of doing or presenting things and may refer to: * Architectural style, the features that ...

Bach
, ,
Brahms Johannes Brahms (; 7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer, pianist, and conductor of the Romantic period Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical, and intellectual movement that origin ...

Brahms
,
Schumann Robert Schumann (; 8 June 181029 July 1856) was a German composer, pianist, and influential music critic. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic Romantic may refer to: Genres and eras * The Romantic era, an ar ...

Schumann
, ,
Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (; 31 January 179719 November 1828) was an Austrian composer of the late Classical Classical may refer to: European antiquity *Classical antiquity, a period of history from roughly the 7th or 8th century B.C.E. to the ...

Schubert
,
Liszt Franz Liszt (; hu, Liszt Ferencz, link=no, in modern usage ''Liszt Ferenc'' ; 22 October 181131 July 1886) was a Hungarian composer, virtuoso A virtuoso (from Italian ''virtuoso'' or , "virtuous", Late Latin Late Latin ( la, Latinitas ...

Liszt
,
Ravel Joseph Maurice Ravel (7 March 1875 – 28 December 1937) was a French composer, pianist and conductor. He is often associated with Impressionism Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement An art movement is a tendency or style in art ...

Ravel
,
Stravinsky Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (; rus, Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, , ˈiɡərʲ ˈfʲɵdərəvʲɪtɕ strɐˈvʲinskʲɪj, Ru-Igor-Feodorovich-Stravinsky.ogg; 6 April 1971) was a Russian composer, pianist and conducto ...

Stravinsky
, Copland, and other masters of the classical music canon. Many of the manuscripts had been unavailable for generations. Among the items are the printer's manuscript of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, complete with Beethoven's handwritten amendments, that was used for the first performance in
Vienna Vienna ( ; german: Wien ; bar, Wean, label=Bavarian language, Austro-Bavarian ) is the Capital city, national capital, largest city, and one of States of Austria, nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's List of cities and towns in Austria, mos ...

Vienna
in 1824; Mozart's autograph of the wind parts of the final scene of ''
The Marriage of Figaro ''The Marriage of Figaro'' ( it, Le nozze di Figaro, links=no, ), K. 492, is an opera buffa ''Opera buffa'' (; "comic opera", plural: ''opere buffe'') is a genre of opera Opera is a form of theatre in which music is a fundamental ...
''; Beethoven's arrangement of his monumental '' Große Fuge'' for piano four hands; Schumann's working draft of his Symphony No. 2; and manuscripts of Brahms's Symphony No. 2 and Piano Concerto No. 2. The entire collection has since been digitized and can be viewed online. In 2010, philanthropist James S. Marcus donated $10 million to the school to establish the Ellen and James S. Marcus Institute for Vocal Arts at the school. On September 28, 2015, the Juilliard School announced a major expansion into
Tianjin Tianjin (; ; Mandarin: ), Postal Map Romanization, alternately romanized as Tientsin, is a Direct-administered municipalities of China, municipality and a coastal metropolis in North China, Northern China on the shore of the Bohai Sea. It is ...

Tianjin
during a visit by China's first lady,
Peng Liyuan Peng Liyuan (, ; born 20 November 1962) is a Chinese contemporary folk singer who is the spouse of the President of the People's Republic of China. Peng Liyuan is married to the current General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party ...

Peng Liyuan
, the institution's first such full-scale foray outside the United States, with plans to offer a
master's degree A master's degree (from Latin ) is an academic degree awarded by University, universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of Profession, professio ...
program. In May 2017, retired
New York City Ballet New York City Ballet (NYCB) is a ballet companyA ballet company is a type of dance troupe which performs classical ballet, neoclassical ballet, and/or contemporary ballet in the European tradition, plus managerial and support staff. Most major ...
principal dancer
Damian Woetzel Damian Woetzel (born May 17, 1967) is the 7th President of The Juilliard School. Woetzel was a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet New York City Ballet (NYCB) is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine ...
was named president, replacing Joseph W. Polisi.


2021 tuition hike protests

In June 2021, students of the student group ''The Socialist Penguins'' organized a protest against rising tuition costs after claiming that they "weren't being listened to" when meeting with president and provost about the tuition fees. The tuition was to be increased by $1,980/year for new and existing students, bringing the annual tuition fee to $51,230. Certain sister schools, on the other hand, had frozen their tuition in the wake of the
COVID-19 pandemic The COVID-19 pandemic is an ongoing global pandemic A pandemic (from , , "all" and , , "local people" the 'crowd') is an of an that has spread across a large region, for instance multiple or worldwide, affecting a substantial numbe ...

COVID-19 pandemic
. A group of protesters alleged that campus security had attempted to lock them into the building.


Admission

Juilliard admits both degree program seekers and pre-college division students. The latter enter a conservatory program for younger students to develop their skills; All applicants who wish to enroll in the Music Advancement Program, for the Pre-College Division, must perform an audition in person before members of the faculty and administration and must be between ages 8 and 18. The Juilliard admissions program comprises several distinct steps. Applicants must submit a complete application, school transcripts, and recommendations; some majors also require that applicants submit prescreening recordings of their work, which are evaluated as part of the application. A limited number of applicants are then invited to a live audition, sometimes with additional callbacks. After auditions, the school invites select applicants to meet with a program administrator. Admission to the Juilliard School is highly competitive. In 2007, the school received 2,138 applications for admission, of which 162 were admitted for a 7.6% acceptance rate. For the fall semester of 2009, the school had an 8.0% acceptance rate. In 2011, the school accepted 5.5% of applicants. For Fall 2012, 2,657 undergraduate applicants were received by the college division and 7.2% were accepted. The 75th percentile accepted into Juilliard in 2012 had a
GPA The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit SI derived units are units of measurement ' Measurement is the number, numerical quantification (science), quantification of the variable and attribute (research), attributes of an object or event ...
of 3.96 and an score of 1350. A cross-registration program is available with
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a in . Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of in , Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in and ...

Columbia University
where Juilliard students who are accepted to the program are able to attend Columbia classes, and vice-versa. The program is highly selective, admitting 10-12 students from Juilliard per year. Columbia students also have the option of pursuing an accelerated
Master of Music The Master of Music (M.M. or M.Mus.) is, as an academic title, the first graduate degree Degree may refer to: As a unit of measurement * Degree symbol (°), a notation used in science, engineering, and mathematics * Degree (angle), a unit ...
degree at Juilliard and obtaining a bachelor's degree at
Barnard Barnard is a rare Irish Irish most commonly refers to: * Someone or something of, from, or related to: ** Ireland, an island situated off the north-western coast of continental Europe ** Northern Ireland, a constituent unit of the United Kingdom o ...
or Columbia and an MM from Juilliard in five (or potentially six, for voice majors) years.


Academics

The school offers courses in dance, drama, and music. The Dance Division was established in 1951 by William Schuman with Martha Hill as its director. It offers a
Bachelor of Fine Arts A Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A. or BFA) is a standard undergraduate Undergraduate education ieducationconducted after secondary education and prior to postgraduate education. It typically includes all postsecondary programs up to the level o ...
or a Diploma. The Drama Division was established in 1968 by the actor
John Houseman John Houseman (born Jacques Haussmann; September 22, 1902 – October 31, 1988) was a Romanian-born British-American actor and producer of theatre, film, and television. He became known for his highly publicized collaboration with director ...

John Houseman
and
Michel Saint-Denis Michel Jacques Saint-Denis (13 September 1897 – 31 July 1971), ''dit'' Jacques Duchesne, was a French French (french: français(e), link=no) may refer to: * Something of, from, or related to France France (), officially the French Re ...
. Its acting programs offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts, a Diploma and, beginning in Fall 2012, a
Master of Fine Arts A Master of Fine Arts (MFA or M.F.A.) is a terminal degree A terminal degree is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary ...
. Until 2006, when James Houghton became director of the Drama Division, there was a "cut system" that would remove up to one-third of the second-year class. The
Lila Acheson WallaceLila Bell Wallace (December 25, 1889 – May 8, 1984) was an American magazine publisher and philanthropist. She co-founded ''Reader's Digest'' with her husband Dewitt Wallace, publishing the first issue in 1922. Early life and education Born Lila B ...
American Playwrights Program, begun in 1993, offers one-year, tuition-free, graduate fellowships; selected students may be offered a second-year extension and receive an Artist Diploma. The
Andrew W. Mellon Andrew William Mellon (; March 24, 1855 – August 26, 1937), sometimes A.W., was an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States ...
Artist Diploma Program for Theatre Directors was a two-year graduate fellowship that began in 1995 (expanded to three years in 1997); this was discontinued in the fall of 2006. The Music Division is the largest of the school's divisions. Available degrees are
Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Music (B.M. or BMus) is an academic degree An academic degree is a qualification awarded to students upon successful completion of a course of study in higher education, usually at a college or university. These institutions commonly ...
or Diploma,
Master of Music The Master of Music (M.M. or M.Mus.) is, as an academic title, the first graduate degree Degree may refer to: As a unit of measurement * Degree symbol (°), a notation used in science, engineering, and mathematics * Degree (angle), a unit ...
or Graduate Diploma, Artist Diploma and
Doctor of Musical Arts The Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) is a doctorate, doctoral academic degree in music. The DMA combines advanced studies in an applied area of specialization (usually Performance, music performance, music composition, or conducting) with graduate-leve ...
.
Academic major An academic major is the academic discipline An academic discipline or academic field is a subdivision of knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity or awareness, of someone or something, such as facts A fact is an occurrence in the real wor ...
s are brass, collaborative piano, composition,
guitar The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that typically has six string instrument, strings. It is held flat against the player's body and played by strumming or Plucked string instrument, plucking the strings with the dominant hand, while sim ...

guitar
,
harp The harp is a stringed musical instrument String instruments, stringed instruments, or chordophones are musical instrument A musical instrument is a device created or adapted to make Music, musical sounds. In principle, any object that p ...

harp
, historical performance, jazz studies, orchestral conducting, organ, percussion,
piano The piano is an acoustic Acoustic may refer to: Music Albums * Acoustic (Bayside EP), ''Acoustic'' (Bayside EP) * Acoustic (Britt Nicole EP), ''Acoustic'' (Britt Nicole EP) * Acoustic (Joey Cape and Tony Sly album), ''Acoustic'' (Joey Cape ...

piano
, strings, voice, and woodwinds. The collaborative piano, historical performance, and orchestral conducting programs are solely at the graduate level; the opera studies and music performance subprograms only offer Artist Diplomas. The Juilliard Vocal Arts department now incorporates the former Juilliard Opera Center. All Bachelor and Master courses require credits from the Liberal Arts course; Joseph W. Polisi is a member of the Liberal Arts faculty.


Pre-College Division

The Pre-College Division teaches students enrolled in elementary,
junior high A middle school (also known as intermediate school, junior high school, or lower secondary school) is an educational stage which exists in some countries, providing education between primary school and secondary school. The concept, regulation an ...
, and high school. The Pre-College Division is conducted every Saturday from September to May in the Juilliard Building at Lincoln Center. All students study
solfège In music, solfège (, ; ) or solfeggio (; ), also called sol-fa, solfa, solfeo, among many names, is a music education Music education is a field of practice in which educators are trained for careers as primary education, elementary or seconda ...
and
music theory Music theory is the study of the practices and possibilities of music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elem ...
in addition to their primary instrument. Vocal majors must also study diction and performance. Similarly, pianists must study piano performance. String, brass and woodwind players, as well as percussionists, also participate in orchestra. The pre-college has two orchestras, the Pre-College Symphony (PCS) and the Pre-College Orchestra (PCO). Placement is by age and students may elect to study conducting, chorus, and chamber music. The Pre-College Division began as the Preparatory Centers (later the Preparatory Division), part of the Institute of Musical Art since 1916. The Pre-College Division was established in 1969 with Katherine McC. Ellis as its first director. Olegna Fuschi served as director from 1975 to 1988. The Fuschi/Mennin partnership allowed the Pre-College Division to thrive, affording its graduates training at the highest artistic level (with many of the same teachers as the college division), as well as their own commencement ceremony and diplomas. In addition to Fuschi, directors of Juilliard's Pre-College Division have included composer Dr. Andrew Thomas. The current director of the Pre-College Division is Yoheved Kaplinsky.


Music Technology Center

The Music Technology Center at the Juilliard School was created in 1993 to provide students with the opportunity to use digital technology in the creation and performance of new music. Since then, the program has expanded to include a wide offering of classes such as, Introduction to Music Technology, Music Production,
Film scoring A film score is original music written specifically to accompany a film A film, also called a movie, motion picture or moving picture, is a work of visual art The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is th ...
, Computers In Performance and an Independent Study In Composition. In 2009, the Music Technology Center moved to a new, state of the art facility that includes a mix and record suite and a digital "playroom" for composing and rehearsing with technology. Together with the Willson Theater, the Music Technology Center is the home of interdisciplinary and electro-acoustic projects and performances at the Juilliard School.


Juilliard Electric Ensemble

The Juilliard Electric Ensemble was created in 2003 to provide students from all three of Juilliard's divisions (
dance Dance is a performing art art form, form consisting of sequences of movement, either improvised or purposefully selected. This movement has aesthetic and often symbolism (arts), symbolic value. Dance can be categorized and described by its ...

dance
,
drama Drama is the specific Mode (literature), mode of fiction Mimesis, represented in performance: a Play (theatre), play, opera, mime, ballet, etc., performed in a theatre, or on Radio drama, radio or television.Elam (1980, 98). Considered as a ...

drama
, and
music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elements such as (which governs and ), (and its associated concepts , , and ...

music
) with an opportunity to use new technology in the creation and performance of interactive and multi-disciplinary work. In past performances, the Juilliard Electric Ensemble has used interactive technology to expand the range of their instruments, control audio and visual elements with electronic tools, shape video and projection design in real-time by moving through a virtual field, and interact with artists and computers around the world via the web. Since its debut, the Electric Ensemble has performed works by over 50 composers including
Joan La Barbara Joan Linda La Barbara (born June 8, 1947) is an American vocalist and composer A composer (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally s ...
,
Kenji Bunch Kenji Bunch (born July 27, 1973) is an American composer and violist living in Portland, OR. Bunch currently serves as the Artistic Director oFear No Musicand teaches at Portland State University, Reed College, and for the Portland Youth Philharmoni ...
, Eric Chasalow,
Sebastian Currier Sebastian Currier (born March 16, 1959) is an American composer A composer (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the ar ...
,
Avner Dorman Avner Dorman (Hebrew Hebrew (, , or ) is a Northwest Semitic languages, Northwest Semitic language of the Afroasiatic languages, Afroasiatic language family. Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites, Judeans and their ...
, Jonathan Harvey,
Jocelyn Pook Jocelyn Pook (; born 14 February 1960) is an English composer, and viola player. Education Pook graduated in 1983 from London's Guildhall School of Music and Drama The Guildhall School of Music and Drama is a conservatoire A music school is ...

Jocelyn Pook
,
Steve Reich Stephen Michael Reich ( ; born October 3, 1936) is an American composer known for his contribution to the development of minimal music Minimal music (also called minimalism)"Minimalism in music has been defined as an aesthetic, a style, an ...

Steve Reich
, Daniel Bernard Roumain,
Karlheinz Stockhausen Karlheinz Stockhausen (; 22 August 1928 – 5 December 2007) was a German composer, widely acknowledged by critics as one of the most important but also controversial composers of the 20th 20 (twenty; Roman numeral XX) is the natural numbe ...
,
Morton Subotnick at his studio, New York University Tisch School of the Arts, Asia, NYU (2012) Morton Subotnick (born April 14, 1933) is an United States of America, American composer of electronic music, best known for his 1967 composition ''Silver Apples of the ...
, Alejandro Viñao, Jacob ter Veldhuis, David Wallace, Mark Wood, and Peter Wyer.


Performing ensembles

The Juilliard School has a variety of ensembles, including
chamber music Chamber music is a form of classical music Classical music generally refers to the formal musical tradition of the Western world The Western world, also known as the West, refers to various regions, nations and state (polity), sta ...
,
jazz Jazz is a music genre A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music Music is the art of arranging sounds in time to produce a composition through the elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre ...
, orchestras, and vocal/
choral A choir (; also known as a chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble A musical ensemble, also known as a music group or musical group, is a group of people who perform instrumental An instrumental is a recording normally without any v ...

choral
groups. Juilliard's orchestras include the Juilliard Orchestra, the New Juilliard Ensemble, the Juilliard Theatre Orchestra, and the Conductors' Orchestra. The Axiom Ensemble is a student directed and managed group dedicated to well-known 20th-century works. In addition, Juilliard resident ensembles, which feature faculty members, perform frequently at the school. These groups include the
Juilliard String Quartet The Juilliard String Quartet is a classical music Classical music generally refers to the formal musical tradition of the Western world The Western world, also known as the West, refers to various regions, nations and state (polity), ...

Juilliard String Quartet
and the
American Brass QuintetWhen the American Brass Quintet gave its first public performance on December 11, 1960, brass chamber music was still relatively young to concert audiences. The New York Brass Quintet is regarded as the first brass quintet in the United States, havin ...
.


Notable people


References


Further reading

* ''Ten Years of American Opera Design at the Juilliard School of Music'', published by New York Public Library, 1941. * ''The Juilliard Report on Teaching the Literature and Materials of Music'', by Juilliard School of Music. Published by Norton, 1953. * ''The Juilliard Review'', by Richard Franko Goldman, published by Juilliard School of Music, 1954. * ''The Juilliard Journal'', published by the Juilliard School, 1985. * ''Nothing But the Best: The Struggle for Perfection at the Juilliard School'', by Judith Kogan. Published by
Random House Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world. The company has several independently managed subsidiaries around the world. It is part of Penguin Random House Penguin Random Hous ...

Random House
, 1987. . * ''Guide to the Juilliard School Archives'', by Juilliard School Archives, Jane Gottlieb, Stephen E. Novak, Taras Pavlovsky. Published by The School, 1992. *
Juilliard: A History
', by Andrea Olmstead. Published by
University of Illinois Press The University of Illinois Press (UIP) is an American university press A university press is an academic publishing Publishing is the activity of making information, literature, music, software and other content available to the public for s ...
, 2002, . * ''A Living Legacy: Historic Stringed Instruments at the Juilliard School'', by Lisa Brooks Robinson, Itzhak Perlman. Amadeus Press, 2006. .


External links

*
The Juilliard School – its history at 100

Andrea Olmstead papers, 1970–2013
Music Division, The New York Public Library. Olmstead's papers hold the research she carried out for her book on Juilliard, and include recorded interviews with various faculty, former students, and staff. {{authority control 1905 establishments in New York City Dance schools in the United States Diller Scofidio + Renfro buildings Drama schools in the United States Educational institutions established in 1905 Lincoln Center Music schools in New York City United States National Medal of Arts recipients Universities and colleges in Manhattan Dance in New York City Private universities and colleges in New York City