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Gonville & Caius College (often referred to simply as Caius ) is a
constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university () is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in several Discipline (academi ...
of the
University of Cambridge , mottoeng = Literal: From here, light and sacred draughts. Non literal: From this place, we gain enlightenment and precious knowledge. , established = , other_name = The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of ...
in
Cambridge Cambridge ( ) is a university city and the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' ...

Cambridge
,
England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. E ...

England
. Originally founded in 1348, it is the fourth-oldest of the thirty-one colleges at the University of Cambridge and one of the wealthiest. The college has been attended by many students who have gone on to significant accomplishment, including fifteen
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
winners, the second-most of any
Oxbridge Oxbridge is a portmanteau A portmanteau (, ) or portmanteau word (from "portmanteau (luggage) A portmanteau is a piece of luggage Baggage or luggage consists of bags, cases, and containers which hold a travel Travel is the move ...
college (after
Trinity College, Cambridge Trinity College is a constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) education ...
). The college has long historical associations with medical teaching, especially due to its alumni physicians:
John Caius John Caius (born John Kays ; 6 October 1510 – 29 July 1573), also known as Johannes Caius and Ioannes Caius, was an English physician A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Comm ...

John Caius
(who gave the college the
caduceus The caduceus (☤; ; la, cādūceus, from grc-gre, κηρύκειον "herald's wand, or staff") is the staff carried by Hermes Hermes (; grc-gre, Ἑρμῆς) is an Olympian deity in ancient Greek religion and Greek mythology, ...

caduceus
in its insignia) and
William Harvey William Harvey (1 April 1578 – 3 June 1657) was an English physician who made influential contributions in anatomy Anatomy (Greek ''anatomē'', 'dissection') is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organis ...

William Harvey
. Other famous alumni in the sciences include
Francis Crick Francis Harry Compton Crick (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was a British molecular biologist Molecular biology is the branch of biology Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their anatomy, ...

Francis Crick
(joint discoverer, along with
James Watson James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is an American molecular biologist Molecular biology is the branch of biology Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their anatomy, physical structur ...

James Watson
, of the structure of
DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid (; DNA) is a molecule A scanning tunneling microscopy image of pentacene molecules, which consist of linear chains of five carbon rings. A molecule is an electrically Electricity is the set of physical ...

DNA
),
James Chadwick Sir James Chadwick, (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was a British physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical m ...

James Chadwick
(discoverer of the
neutron The neutron is a subatomic particle, symbol or , which has a neutral (not positive or negative) charge, and a mass slightly greater than that of a proton. Protons and neutrons constitute the nuclei of atoms. Since protons and neutrons behav ...

neutron
) and
Howard Florey Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey (24 September 189821 February 1968) was an Australian pharmacologist Pharmacology is a branch of medicine and pharmaceutical sciences concerned with drug or medication action, where a drug may be defi ...

Howard Florey
(developer of
penicillin Penicillins (P, PCN or PEN) are a group of antibiotics An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial An antimicrobial is an agent that kills microorganism A microorganism, or microbe,, ''mikros'', "small") and ''organism ...

penicillin
).
Stephen Hawking Stephen William Hawking (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018) was an English theoretical physicist Theoretical physics is a branch of physics Physics is the that studies , its , its and behavior through , and the related enti ...

Stephen Hawking
, previously Cambridge's Lucasian Chair of Mathematics
Emeritus ''Emeritus'' (; female: ''Emerita''), in its current usage, is an adjective used to designate a retired chair, professor, pastor, bishop, pope, director, president, prime minister, rabbi, emperor, or other person who has been "permitted to retai ...
, was a
fellow A fellow is a broad concept whose exact meaning depends on context. In learned Learning is the process of acquiring new understanding, knowledge, behaviors, skills, value (personal and cultural), values, attitudes, and preferences. The abil ...
of the college until his death in 2018. The college also maintains reputable academic programmes in many different disciplines, including law, economics, English literature and history. Other notable alumni include former Chancellor of the Exchequer and Father of the House of Commons,
Kenneth Clarke Kenneth Harry Clarke, Baron Clarke of Nottingham, (born 2 July 1940), often known as Ken Clarke, is a British politician who served as Home Secretary The home secretary, officially the secretary of state for the Home Department, is a se ...
, comedian and television presenter
Jimmy Carr James Anthony Patrick Carr (born 15 September 1972) is a British-Irish comedian, television presenter, writer and actor. He is known for his dark humour, distinctive laugh, and heckler interaction. After working as a marketing executive, Carr m ...
,
John Venn John Venn, FRS FRS may also refer to: Government and politics * Facility Registry System, a centrally managed Environmental Protection Agency database that identifies places of environmental interest in the United States * Family Resources ...

John Venn
, inventor of the
Venn diagram A Venn diagram is a widely used diagram A diagram is a symbolic representation Representation may refer to: Law and politics *Representation (politics) Political representation is the activity of making citizens "present" in public policy ...
and
Alastair Campbell Alastair John Campbell (born 25 May 1957) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. He worked as Tony Blair's spokesman and campaign director (1994–1997), then as Downing Street Press Secretary and as the Prime Minister's Official Spok ...

Alastair Campbell
, former aide to
Tony Blair Sir Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007 and Leader of the Labour Party (UK), Leader of the Labour Party from 1994 to 2007. On his resig ...

Tony Blair
. Several streets in the city, such as Harvey Road, Glisson Road and Gresham Road, are named after alumni of the College. The college and its masters have been influential in the development of the university, founding other colleges like Trinity Hall and Darwin College and providing land on the
Sidgwick Site building, on the Sidgwick Site The Sidgwick Site is one of the largest sites within the University of Cambridge, England. Overview and history , part of the Faculty of History, University of Cambridge, Faculty of History The Sidgwick Site is loc ...
, e.g. for the
Squire Law Library The Faculty of Law, Cambridge is the law school of the University of Cambridge. The faculty is one of the world's oldest and finest law schools that is renowned for the quality of its teaching and cutting-edge legal research, particularly in int ...
.


History

The college was first founded, as ''Gonville Hall'', by
Edmund Gonville Edmund Gonville (died 1351) founded Gonville Hall in 1348, which later was re-founded by John Caius John Caius (born John Kays ; 6 October 1510 – 29 July 1573), also known as Johannes Caius and Ioannes Caius, was an English physician ...
, Rector of Terrington St Clement in
Norfolk Norfolk () is a rural and non-metropolitan county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambe ...

Norfolk
in 1348, making it the fourth-oldest surviving college. When Gonville died three years later, he left a struggling institution with almost no money. The executor of his will,
William Bateman William Bateman (c. 1298 – 6 January 1355) was a medieval Bishop of Norwich The Bishop of Norwich is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Norwich in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers most of the county of Norfolk ...
,
Bishop of Norwich The Bishop of Norwich is the ordinary Ordinary or The Ordinary often refer to: Music * Ordinary (EP), ''Ordinary'' (EP) (2015), by South Korean group Beast * Ordinary (Every Little Thing album), ''Ordinary'' (Every Little Thing album) (2011) ...
, stepped in, transferring the college to its current location. He leased himself the land close to the river to set up his own college, Trinity Hall, and renamed Gonville Hall ''The Hall of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary''. Bateman appointed as the first Master of the new college his former chaplain
John Colton John is a common English name and surname: * John (given name) * John (surname), including a list of people who have the name John John may also refer to: New Testament Works *Johannine literature ** Gospel of John, a title often shortened to ...
, later
Archbishop of Armagh The Archbishop of Armagh is an archiepiscopal In many Christian Denominations, an archbishop (, via Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was ori ...
. By the sixteenth century, the college had fallen into disrepair, and in 1557 it was refounded by
Royal Charter A royal charter is a formal grant issued by a monarch under royal prerogative The royal prerogative is a body of customary authority, privilege and immunity, recognized in common law In law, common law (also known as judicial precedent or ...

Royal Charter
as ''Gonville & Caius College'' by the physician
John Caius John Caius (born John Kays ; 6 October 1510 – 29 July 1573), also known as Johannes Caius and Ioannes Caius, was an English physician A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Comm ...

John Caius
. John Caius was master of the college from 1559 until shortly before his death in 1573. He provided the college with significant funds and greatly extended the buildings. During his time as Master, Caius accepted no payment but insisted on several unusual rules. He insisted that the college admit no scholar who "is deformed, dumb, blind, lame, maimed, mutilated, a Welshman, or suffering from any grave or contagious illness, or an invalid, that is sick in a serious measure". Caius also built a three-sided court, Caius Court, "lest the air from being confined within a narrow space should become foul". Caius did, however, found the college as a strong centre for the study of
medicine Medicine is the science Science () is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts ( descriptive knowledge), skills (proced ...

medicine
, a tradition that it aims to keep to this day. By 1630, the college had expanded greatly, having around 25 fellows and 150 students, but numbers fell over the next century, returning to the 1630 level only in the early nineteenth century. Since then the college has grown considerably and now has one of the largest undergraduate populations in the university. The college first admitted
women A woman is an adult female Female (symbol: ♀) is the sex of an organism that produces the large non-mobile ovum, ova (egg cells), the type of gamete (sex cell) that fuses with the Sperm, male gamete during sexual reproduction. A female ...

women
as fellows and students in 1979. It now has over 110 Fellows, over 700 students and about 200 staff. Gonville & Caius is one of the wealthiest of all Cambridge colleges with an endowment of £221 million in 2018. The college's present
Master Master or masters may refer to: Ranks or titles *Ascended master Ascended masters in the Ascended Master Teachings of a number of movements in the theosophical tradition are believed to be spiritually enlightened beings who in past incarn ...
, the 43rd, is Pippa Rogerson.


Buildings and grounds


Old Courts

The first buildings to be erected on the college's current site date from 1353 when Bateman built Gonville Court. The college chapel was added in 1393 with the Old Hall (used until recently as a library) and Master's Lodge following in the next half century. Most of the stone used to build the college came from
Ramsey Abbey Ramsey Abbey was a Benedictine The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a Christian monasticism, monastic Religious order (Catholic), religious order of the Catholic Ch ...
near
Ramsey, Cambridgeshire Ramsey is a market town and civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration ...
. Gonville and Caius has the oldest purpose-built college chapel in either Oxford or Cambridge which has been in continuous use as such. The chapel is situated centrally within the college, reflecting the college's religious foundation. On the re-foundation by Caius, the college was expanded and updated. In 1565 the building of Caius Court began, and Caius planted an avenue of trees in what is now known as Tree Court. He was also responsible for the building of the college's three gates, symbolising the path of academic life. On matriculation, one arrives at the Gate of Humility (near the Porters' Lodge). In the centre of the college one passes through the Gate of Virtue regularly. And finally, graduating students pass through the Gate of Honour on their way to the neighbouring
Senate House
Senate House
to receive their degrees. The Gate of Honour, at the south side of Caius Court, though the most direct way from the Old Courts to the College Library (''Cockerell Building''), is only used for special occasions such as graduation. The students of Gonville and Caius commonly refer to the fourth gate in the college, between Tree Court and Gonville Court, which also gives access to some lavatories, as the Gate of Necessity. The buildings of Gonville Court were given classical
facade
facade
s in the 1750s, and the Old Library and the Hall were designed by
Anthony Salvin Anthony Salvin (17 October 1799 – 17 December 1881) was an English architect. He gained a reputation as an expert on Middle Ages, medieval buildings and applied this expertise to his new buildings and his restorations. He restored castles an ...
in 1854. On the wall of the Hall hangs a college flag which in 1912 was flown at the
South Pole The South Pole, also known as the Geographic South Pole, Terrestrial South Pole or 90th Parallel South, is one of the two points where Earth's axis of rotation intersects its surface. It is the southernmost point on Earth and lies on the ...
by Cambridge's
Edward Adrian Wilson Edward Adrian Wilson (23 July 1872 – 29 March 1912) was an English polar explorer This list is for recognised pioneering explorers of the polar regions. It does not include subsequent travelers and expeditions. Polar explorers * J ...
during the famous
Terra Nova Expedition The ''Terra Nova'' Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition, was an expedition to Antarctica which took place between 1910 and 1913. Led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott Captain Captain is a title for the commander of a mi ...
of 1910–1913. Gonville Court, though remodelled in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, is the oldest part of the college. New lecture rooms were designed by
Alfred Waterhouse Alfred Waterhouse (19 July 1830 – 22 August 1905) was an English architect An architect is a person who plans, designs and oversees the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with t ...
and completed by
Rattee and Kett Rattee and Kett was a building contractor based in Cambridge Cambridge ( ) is a College town, university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam approximately north of London. At the United Kingdom Census 2011, th ...
in 1884. Tree Court is the largest of the Old Courts. It is so named because John Caius planted an avenue of trees there. Although none of the original trees survive, the court retains a number of trees and the tree-lined avenue, which is unusual for a Cambridge front court.


West Road site

Caius owns a substantial amount of land between West Road and Sidgwick Avenue. Set in landscaped gardens, the modern Harvey Court (named after
William Harvey William Harvey (1 April 1578 – 3 June 1657) was an English physician who made influential contributions in anatomy Anatomy (Greek ''anatomē'', 'dissection') is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organis ...

William Harvey
and designed by
Leslie Martin Sir John Leslie Martin (17 August 1908, in Manchester Manchester () is the most-populous city and metropolitan borough A metropolitan borough is a type of local government district The districts of England (also known as local auth ...
) was built on the West Road site in 1961. Adjacent to Harvey Court is the Stephen Hawking Building, which opened its doors to first-year undergraduates in October 2006. Providing ensuite accommodation for 75 students and eight fellows, as well as providing conference facilities in the vacations, the Stephen Hawking Building boasts some of the highest-standard student accommodation in Cambridge. Additional buildings provide housing for older students, a day care, and various study and music rooms. The college also owns extensive gardens and the land on which the adjacent
Squire Law Library The Faculty of Law, Cambridge is the law school of the University of Cambridge. The faculty is one of the world's oldest and finest law schools that is renowned for the quality of its teaching and cutting-edge legal research, particularly in int ...
has stood since 1995.


Library

Caius also has one of the largest libraries in Oxbridge, housed in the Cockerell Building. Caius acquired the lease on the building, which previously housed the Seeley History Library and the
Squire Law Library The Faculty of Law, Cambridge is the law school of the University of Cambridge. The faculty is one of the world's oldest and finest law schools that is renowned for the quality of its teaching and cutting-edge legal research, particularly in int ...
, in the 1990s. The college library was relocated there from Gonville Court in the summer of 1996, following an extensive renovation.


Other courts and college accommodation

These courts are across
Trinity Street
Trinity Street
on land surrounding St Michael's Church. St Michael's Court was completed only in the 1930s, with the building on its south side of a new building overlooking the Market Place. The college also owns several houses around Cambridge, on Mortimer Road and Gresham Road, where some second year undergraduates live, and on Harvey Road and St Paul's Road, which are occupied by graduate students.


Grounds

The Fellows' garden lies just beyond Harvey Court, on Sidgwick Avenue. The extensive sports fields are located on Barton Road, a few minute's walk from Harvey Court.


Traditions

Gonville and Caius College maintains many traditions, and is unusual in that it offers two seatings in Hall six nights a week. Typically attended by between 200–300 students, Hall consists of a three-course meal served after 18:00 (First Hall) or 19:15 (Formal Hall); Formal Hall requires a gown be worn, also seats Fellows at high table, and is preceded by the benediction: ''Benedic, Domine, nobis et donis tuis quae ex largitate tua sumus sumpturi; et concede ut, ab iis salubriter enutriti, tibi debitum obsequium praestare valeamus, per Jesum Christum dominum nostrum; mensae caelestis nos participes facias, Rex aeternae gloriae.' As at most Oxbridge colleges, it is tradition that only the Fellows may walk on the grass. The college also enforces the system of " exeats", or official permissions to leave the college. Students wishing to be absent from college overnight during term time must obtain leave to do so from their tutors, and "terminal exeats" must be obtained before the end of term.


Student life

Caius Boat Club Caius Boat Club (CBC; ''Caius'' pronounced ''keys'') is the boat club for members of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. The Club has rowed on the River Cam since 1827, and like the other college boat clubs its aim is to gain and hold the heads ...

Caius Boat Club
is the college's boat club, with the men's 1st
VIII
VIII
remaining unbeaten in the seasons of 2010/11 and of 2011/2012, and (as of 2019) is currently in possession of both the Lent and May
Bumps A bumps race is a form of rowing (sport), rowing race in which a number of boats chase each other in single file, each crew attempting to catch and ‘bump’ the boat in front without being caught by the boat behind. The form is mainly used in ...

Bumps
headships. Caius Jazz takes place most terms in the college bar, inviting 'some of the most illustrious names in the contemporary scene' and a house band of students studying at London conservatoires to play in the college bar. In recent years Steve Fishwick, Sam Mayne, Ian Shaw, Barry Green, Gareth Lockrane, and Paul Jarvis have all been featured. The Caius
May Ball A May Ball is a ball A ball is a round object (usually spherical of a sphere A sphere (from Greek language, Greek —, "globe, ball") is a geometrical object in three-dimensional space Three-dimensional space (also: 3-space or, ...
is an all-night party in June, held every two years.


Choir

The choir was founded by the composer
Charles Wood
Charles Wood
in the late nineteenth century, and was most recently directed by the scholar of South-American choral music, Geoffrey Webber until his resignation in 2019. The choir tours abroad and records eclectically. The choir is made up from Scholars and Exhibitioners from the college, and a few volunteers from other colleges.


JCR

The college currently has a GCSU (Gonville and Caius Student Union). George Skeen is the current president.
Gonville and Caius Updates


Notable members


Nobel Prize laureates

* 1932
Charles Scott Sherrington Sir Charles Scott Sherrington (27 November 1857 – 4 March 1952) was an English neurophysiologist, histologist Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy or microanatomy, is the branch of biology which studies the microscopic anatomy o ...
– neurophysiologist (student and fellow). * 1935
James Chadwick Sir James Chadwick, (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was a British physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical m ...

James Chadwick
– physicist, discoverer of the
neutron The neutron is a subatomic particle, symbol or , which has a neutral (not positive or negative) charge, and a mass slightly greater than that of a proton. Protons and neutrons constitute the nuclei of atoms. Since protons and neutrons behav ...

neutron
(student, fellow and master). * 1945
Howard Florey Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey (24 September 189821 February 1968) was an Australian pharmacologist Pharmacology is a branch of medicine and pharmaceutical sciences concerned with drug or medication action, where a drug may be defi ...

Howard Florey
– co-developer of penicillin (fellow). * 1954
Max Born Max Born (; 11 December 1882 – 5 January 1970) was a German physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical method of acqui ...

Max Born
– physicist. * 1962
Francis Crick Francis Harry Compton Crick (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was a British molecular biologist Molecular biology is the branch of biology Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their anatomy, ...

Francis Crick
– discovery of the structure of
DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid (; DNA) is a molecule A scanning tunneling microscopy image of pentacene molecules, which consist of linear chains of five carbon rings. A molecule is an electrically Electricity is the set of physical ...

DNA
(PhD student and honorary fellow). *1972
John Hicks Sir John Hicks (8 April 1904 – 20 May 1989) was a British economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the Branches of science, branch of science devoted to the study of society, ...

John Hicks
– economist (fellow). * 1974
Antony Hewish Antony Hewish (born 11 May 1924) is a British radio astronomer Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy Astronomy (from el, ἀστρονομία, literally meaning the science that studies the laws of the stars) is a natural scie ...
– astronomer (student and fellow). * 1976
Milton Friedman Milton Friedman (; July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the branch The branches and leaves of a tree. A branch ( ...

Milton Friedman
– economist (visiting fellow). * 1977
Nevill Francis Mott Sir Nevill Francis Mott (30 September 1905 – 8 August 1996) was a British physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical me ...
– theoretical physicist (fellow and master). * 1984
Richard Stone Sir John Richard Nicholas Stone (30 August 1913 – 6 December 1991) was an eminent British British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people, nationals or natives of the United Kingdom, British Overseas Territories, an ...
– economist. * 2001
Joseph Stiglitz Joseph Eugene Stiglitz (; born February 9, 1943) is an American economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the branch The branches and leaves of a tree. A branch ( or , ) ...

Joseph Stiglitz
– economist (fellow). * 2008
Roger Tsien Roger Yonchien Tsien (February 1, 1952 – August 24, 2016) was an American biochemist Biochemists are scientists who are trained in biochemistry Biochemistry or biological chemistry, is the study of chemical process In a scientific ...
– chemist (fellow). * 2013
Michael Levitt Michael Levitt, ( he, מיכאל לויט; born 9 May 1947) is a South African-born jewish biophysicist and a professor of structural biology at Stanford University, a position he has held since 1987. Levitt received the 2013 Nobel Prize in Ch ...

Michael Levitt
– chemist (PhD student and research fellow). * 2016
Michael Kosterlitz John Michael Kosterlitz (born June 22, 1943) is a British-American physicist. He is a professor of physics at Brown University and the son of biochemist Hans Kosterlitz. He was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, Nobel Prize in physics along ...
– physicist. * 2019 Peter J. Ratcliffe – physician-scientist (student).


Notable alumni


Notable fellows and masters

* Edward Hall Alderson – mathematician, classicist, lawyer and judge (student and fellow). * T. C. Anand Kumar – reproductive biologist and the creator of the first ''scientifically documented'' test tube baby in India (fellow). * Peter Bayley – Drapers Professor of French (fellow). * Victoria Bateman (née Powell) - economist, feminist; known for her nude appearances in public. * Peter Thomas Bauer – economist (student and fellow). * Charles Brink – classicist, Kennedy Professor of Latin (1954–74) (fellow). *
Alastair Campbell Alastair John Campbell (born 25 May 1957) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. He worked as Tony Blair's spokesman and campaign director (1994–1997), then as Downing Street Press Secretary and as the Prime Minister's Official Spok ...

Alastair Campbell
Downing Street Downing Street is a long street in the City of Westminster The City of Westminster is a City status in the United Kingdom, city and London boroughs, borough in Inner London which forms a core part of Central London. It is the site of the ...

Downing Street
Press Secretary A press secretary or press officer is a senior advisor who provides advice on how to deal with the news media trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial Prudential Headquarters, headquarters in Newark, New Jersey, Newa ...
(student and fellow). * Roger Carpenter – neurophysiologist (fellow). *
James Chadwick Sir James Chadwick, (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was a British physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical m ...

James Chadwick
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning physicist, discoverer of the
neutron The neutron is a subatomic particle, symbol or , which has a neutral (not positive or negative) charge, and a mass slightly greater than that of a proton. Protons and neutrons constitute the nuclei of atoms. Since protons and neutrons behav ...

neutron
(student, fellow, and Master). *
John Colton John is a common English name and surname: * John (given name) * John (surname), including a list of people who have the name John John may also refer to: New Testament Works *Johannine literature ** Gospel of John, a title often shortened to ...
Lord Chancellor of Ireland The Lord High Chancellor of Ireland (commonly known as Lord Chancellor of Ireland) was the highest judicial office in Ireland until the establishment of the Irish Free State The Irish Free State ( ga, Saorstát Éireann, , ; 6 December 19 ...
and
Archbishop of Armagh The Archbishop of Armagh is an archiepiscopal In many Christian Denominations, an archbishop (, via Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was ori ...
(first Master). *
Francis Crick Francis Harry Compton Crick (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was a British molecular biologist Molecular biology is the branch of biology Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their anatomy, ...

Francis Crick
– co-
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
winner for the co-discovery of the structure of
DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid (; DNA) is a molecule A scanning tunneling microscopy image of pentacene molecules, which consist of linear chains of five carbon rings. A molecule is an electrically Electricity is the set of physical ...

DNA
(PhD student and honorary fellow). *
David Daube David Daube (8 February 1909, in Freiburg, German Empire, Germany – 24 February 1999, in Berkeley, California) was the twentieth century's preeminent scholar of ancient law. He combined a familiarity with many legal systems, particularly Roman ...
– the twentieth century's preeminent scholar of ancient law (fellow). * Alfred Doll-Steinberg (1933–2012) – Austrian-born British chemical engineer * M. J. Farrell – economist (fellow). *
Alan Fersht Sir Alan Roy Fersht (born 21 April 1943) is a British chemist A chemist (from Greek ''chēm(ía)'' alchemy; replacing ''chymist'' from Medieval Latin Medieval Latin was the form of Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language ...

Alan Fersht
– chemist and
Fellow of the Royal Society Fellowship of the Royal Society (FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted by the judges of the Royal Society The Royal Society, formally The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, is a and the 's national . Found ...
(student, fellow, and Master). *
Thomas Fink Thomas Fink (born 1972) is an Anglo-American physicist, author and entrepreneur. He has published papers in statistical physics and its applications, written two books and designed an iPhone app. He set up the London Institute for Mathematical S ...

Thomas Fink
, physicist and author (fellow). *
Ronald Fisher Sir Ronald Aylmer Fisher (17 February 1890 – 29 July 1962) was a British polymath A polymath ( el, πολυμαθής, , "having learned much"; la, homo universalis, "universal human") is an individual whose knowledge spans a subs ...
– statistician, evolutionary biologist, and geneticist (student, fellow, and President). *
Howard Florey Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey (24 September 189821 February 1968) was an Australian pharmacologist Pharmacology is a branch of medicine and pharmaceutical sciences concerned with drug or medication action, where a drug may be defi ...

Howard Florey
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning co-inventor of penicillin (fellow). *
James Fox William Fox (born 19 May 1939), known professionally as James Fox, is an English actor, from a well-known acting family. He appeared in several notable films of the 1960s and early 1970s, including '' King Rat'', '' The Servant'', ''Thorough ...
– art historian and broadcaster (fellow). *
Milton Friedman Milton Friedman (; July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the branch The branches and leaves of a tree. A branch ( ...

Milton Friedman
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning economist (visiting fellow). *
Francis Glisson Francis Glisson (1597 – 14 October 1677Guido Giglioni'Glisson, Francis (1599?–1677)' ''Oxford Dictionary of National Biography The ''Dictionary of National Biography'' (''DNB'') is a standard work of reference on notable figures fro ...

Francis Glisson
– physician, and one of the founders of the
Royal Society The Royal Society, formally The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, is a learned society A learned society (; also known as a learned academy, scholarly society, or academic association) is an organization that exis ...
(fellow). * John Hartstonge
Bishop of Derry The Bishop of Derry is an Episcopal polity, episcopal title which takes its name after the monastic settlement originally founded at Daire Calgach and later known as Daire Colm Cille, Anglicised as Derry. In the Roman Catholic Church it remains a ...
(fellow). *
Stephen Hawking Stephen William Hawking (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018) was an English theoretical physicist Theoretical physics is a branch of physics Physics is the that studies , its , its and behavior through , and the related enti ...

Stephen Hawking
– theoretical physicist and former
Lucasian Professor The Lucasian Chair of Mathematics () is a mathematics professorship in the University of Cambridge, England; its holder is known as the Lucasian Professor. The post was founded in 1663 by Henry Lucas (politician), Henry Lucas, who was Cambridge U ...
(fellow). *
Antony Hewish Antony Hewish (born 11 May 1924) is a British radio astronomer Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy Astronomy (from el, ἀστρονομία, literally meaning the science that studies the laws of the stars) is a natural scie ...
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning astronomer (student and fellow). *
John Hicks Sir John Hicks (8 April 1904 – 20 May 1989) was a British economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the Branches of science, branch of science devoted to the study of society, ...

John Hicks
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning economist (fellow). * Edmund Hickeringill – churchman (fellow) *
Robin Holloway Robin Greville Holloway (born 19 October 1943) is an English composer, academic and writer. Early life Holloway was born in Leamington Spa. From 1953 to 1957, he was a chorister at St Paul's Cathedral and was educated at King's College School ...

Robin Holloway
– composer (fellow). *
Sarah Howe Sarah Howe (born 1983) is a Chinese–British poet, editor and researcher in English literature. Her first full poetry collection, ''Loop of Jade'', won the T. S. Eliot Prize and the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, ''Sunday Times'' ...
– poet (fellow). * William Lubbock – divine. *
Stephen Mangan Stephen James Mangan (born 16 May 1968) is an English actor, comedian, presenter and writer. He has played Guy Secretan in ''Green Wing'', Dan Moody in ''I'm Alan Partridge'', Seán Lincoln in ''Episodes (TV series), Episodes'', Bigwig in ''Wat ...

Stephen Mangan
– actor *
Nevill Mott Sir Nevill Francis Mott (30 September 1905 – 8 August 1996) was a British physicist A physicist is a scientist A scientist is a person who conducts scientific research The scientific method is an Empirical evidence, empirical me ...
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning theoretical physicist (fellow and Master). * M. M. Pattison Muir – chemist (fellow). *
Joseph Needham Noel Joseph Terence Montgomery Needham (; 9 December 1900 – 24 March 1995) was a British biochemist, historian and sinologist Sinology or Chinese studies, is an academic discipline that focuses on the study of China China, officially ...
– sinologist (student, fellow, and Master). * Stephen Perse – founder of
The Perse School The Perse School is a Public school (United Kingdom), public school (English Independent school (United Kingdom), independent Day school, day and, in the case of the Perse, a former boarding school) in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1615 by Stephe ...
in 1615. * J. H. Prynne – poet (student and fellow). *
Jonathan Sacks Jonathan Henry Sacks, Baron Sacks ( he, יעקב צבי זקס, translit=Ya'akov Tzvi Zaks; 8 March 19487 November 2020) was a British Orthodox Orthodox, Orthodoxy, or Orthodoxism may refer to: Religion * Orthodoxy, adherence to accepted nor ...
– Chief Rabbi of British Commonwealth (fellow). *
Mohamed Suffian Mohamed Hashim Malay titles, Tun Mohamed Suffian bin Mohamed Hashim (12 November 1917 – 26 September 2000) was a Malaysian judge, eventually serving as Lord President of the Federal Court, Lord President of the Courts of Malaysia, Federal Court from 1974 to 1 ...
– Chief Justice of Malaysia (student and fellow). * John SeeleyRegius Professor of Modern History at
Cambridge Cambridge ( ) is a university city and the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' ...
(fellow). * D.R. Shackleton Bailey – classicist (student and fellow). *
Charles Sherrington Sir Charles Scott Sherrington (27 November 1857 – 4 March 1952) was an English neurophysiologist, histologist Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy or microanatomy, is the branch of biology which studies the microscopic anatomy o ...
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning neurophysiologist (student and fellow). *
Quentin Skinner Quentin Robert Duthie Skinner (born 1940) is a British intellectual historian Intellectual history (also the history of ideas) is the study of the history of human thought and of intellectuals, people who conceptualize, discuss, write about, a ...
Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge (student and fellow). *
Joseph Stiglitz Joseph Eugene Stiglitz (; born February 9, 1943) is an American economist An economist is a professional and practitioner in the social science Social science is the branch The branches and leaves of a tree. A branch ( or , ) ...

Joseph Stiglitz
Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, busines ...
-winning economist (fellow). *
John Venn John Venn, FRS FRS may also refer to: Government and politics * Facility Registry System, a centrally managed Environmental Protection Agency database that identifies places of environmental interest in the United States * Family Resources ...

John Venn
– inventor of the
Venn diagram A Venn diagram is a widely used diagram A diagram is a symbolic representation Representation may refer to: Law and politics *Representation (politics) Political representation is the activity of making citizens "present" in public policy ...
and historian of the College (student, fellow, and President). *
Peter Tranchell Peter Andrew Tranchell (14 July 1922 – 14 September 1993) was a British composer. Life and career Tranchell was born at Cuddalore, India, on 14 July 1922, and educated at the Dragon School, Dragon School, Oxford, Clifton College"Clifton Colle ...
– composer (fellow). * William Wade – English academic lawyer (student and Master). * Joachim Whaley – German and Dutch historian. Pilkington Teaching Prize, 2010. * – composer (fellow). * Edward Wright (mathematician), Edward Wright – mathematician and cartographer who first explained the mathematical basis for the Mercator projection (student and fellow). * Eugenia Cheng – mathematician, author, concert pianist (student).


Notable organ scholars

*Heathcote Dicken Statham (1908–1911)


Burials

*
John Caius John Caius (born John Kays ; 6 October 1510 – 29 July 1573), also known as Johannes Caius and Ioannes Caius, was an English physician A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Comm ...

John Caius
* Thomas Legge * Stephen Perse


Gallery

File:Gate of Honour, Gonville & Caius College.jpg, The Gate of Honour File:Cambridge - Gonville and Caius College - 0951.jpg, Dining Hall File:Cambridge - Gonville and Caius College - 0903.jpg, Fellow Dining Room File:Fisher-stainedglass-gonville-caius.jpg, Stained glass window in dining hall File:Sherrington-stainedglass-gonville-caius.jpg, Stained glass window in dining hall File:Venn-stainedglass-gonville-caius.jpg, Stained glass window in dining hall File:Crick-stainedglass-gonville-caius.jpg, Stained glass window in dining hall File:View from Great St Mary's Cambridge - 04.jpg, View from Great St Mary's Church File:Cambridge - Gonville and Caius College - 1048.jpg, The library File:Cambridge boathouses - Caius (2).jpg, The old boathouse (demolished in 2015) File:Gonville and Caius College shield of arms on Rose Crescent, Cambridge.jpg, College crest


See also

*
Caius Boat Club Caius Boat Club (CBC; ''Caius'' pronounced ''keys'') is the boat club for members of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. The Club has rowed on the River Cam since 1827, and like the other college boat clubs its aim is to gain and hold the heads ...

Caius Boat Club
* Gonville & Caius A.F.C., Gonville & Caius Association Football Club * Organ scholar, List of organ scholars


References


Bibliography

* Brooke, C. ''A history of Gonville and Caius College''. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell, 1985 (corrected reprint, 1996). .


External links

*
Gonville and Caius Students' Union Website

Gonville and Caius MCR Website
{{DEFAULTSORT:Gonville And Caius College, Cambridge Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, 1348 establishments in England 1557 establishments in England Alfred Waterhouse buildings Colleges of the University of Cambridge Grade I listed buildings in Cambridge Grade I listed educational buildings Organisations based in Cambridge with royal patronage