HOME

TheInfoList




Folkestone ( ) is a port town on the
English Channel The English Channel,, "The Sleeve"; nrf, la Maunche, "The Sleeve" (Cotentinais Cotentinais is the dialect The term dialect (from Latin , , from the Ancient Greek word , , "discourse", from , , "through" and , , "I speak") is used in two ...

English Channel
, in
Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), William and Robert ...

Kent
, south-east
England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. E ...

England
. The town lies on the southern edge of the
North Downs The North Downs are a ridge of chalk Chalk is a soft, white, porous Porosity or void fraction is a measure of the (i.e. "empty") spaces in a , and is a of voids over the total volume, between 0 and 1, or as a between 0% and 100%. Stric ...
at a valley between two cliffs. It was an important harbour and shipping port for most of the 19th and 20th centuries. There has been a settlement in this location since the
Mesolithic era The Mesolithic (Ancient Greek language, Greek: μέσος, ''mesos'' "middle"; λίθος, ''lithos'' "stone") is the Old World archaeological period between the Upper Paleolithic and the Neolithic. The term Epipaleolithic is often used synonym ...
. A nunnery was founded by
Eanswith Saint Eanswith ( ang, Ēanswīþ; born c. 630, Kent, England. Died c. 650, Folkestone, England), also spelled Eanswythe or Eanswide, was an Anglo Saxon princess, who is said to have founded Folkestone Priory, one of the first Christian monastic comm ...
, granddaughter of
Æthelberht of Kent Æthelberht (; also Æthelbert, Aethelberht, Aethelbert or Ethelbert; ang, Æðelberht ; 550 – 24 February 616) was Kings of Kent, King of Kingdom of Kent, Kent from about 589 until his death. The eighth-century monk Bede, in his ''Ecc ...
in the 7th century, who is still commemorated as part of the town's culture. During the 13th century it subsequently developed into a
seaport A port is a maritime Maritime may refer to: Geography * Maritime Alps, a mountain range in the southwestern part of the Alps * Maritime Region, a region in Togo * Maritime Southeast Asia * The Maritimes, the Canadian provinces of ...
and the harbour developed during the early 19th century to provide defence against a French invasion, and expanded further West after the arrival of the railway in 1843 as an elegant coastal resort thanks to the investment of the Earl of Radnor under the urban plan of Decimus Burton. In its heyday - during the Edwardian Era - Folkestone was considered the most fashionable resort of the time, visited by Royalties - amongst them Queen Victoria and Edward VII and other members of the English Aristocracy. The architecture of the town, especially in the West End part of the town is a testimony of this period with many impressive buildings, townhouses, villas, private squares and large hotels built to accommodate the gentry. Unfortunately after two world wars and the boom of the holiday package abroad, the town quickly declined. The harbour's use has diminished since the opening of the nearby
Channel Tunnel The Channel Tunnel (also referred to as the Chunnel) is a railway tunnel A tunnel is an underground passageway, dug through the surrounding soil/earth/rock and enclosed except for entrance and exit, commonly at each end. A pipeline ...
and stopping of local ferry services, but still remains in active use. Folkestone is the English terminus of the Channel Tunnel.


History

The area of Folkestone has been occupied since at least the
Mesolithic The Mesolithic (Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is appro ...

Mesolithic
era. In 2010, worked flints were discovered below the remains of the Folkestone Roman Villa. The East Cliff area was excavated in 1924 and most recently from 2010 to 2011 and has produced artefacts from the Mesolithic period through to the
Roman era In , ancient Rome is civilization from the founding of the Italian city of in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the in the 5th century AD, encompassing the (753 BC–509 BC), (509 BC–27 BC) and (27 BC–476 AD) until the fall of ...

Roman era
. On the East Cliff, an extensive
Iron Age The Iron Age is the final epoch of the three-age division of the prehistory Prehistory, also known as pre-literary history, is the period of human history Human history, or world history, is the narrative of Human, humanity's pa ...
oppidum An ''oppidum'' (plural ''oppida'') is a large fortified Iron Age The Iron Age is the final epoch of the three-age system, three-age division of the prehistory and protohistory of Homo sapiens, humanity. It was preceded by the Stone Age (Pal ...

oppidum
existed, which produced
quern-stone Quern-stones are stone A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals included, its chemical composition and the way in which it is formed. Rocks form the E ...
s on an almost industrial scale. Those querns, or stones, which were used for grinding cereals into flour, were traded for continental exports such as pottery and wine. A modest Roman style villa was constructed over the Iron Age settlement sometime during the 1st century AD, followed by a more luxurious one in about 200 AD. The villa was abandoned sometime during the 3rd or 4th century for unknown reasons. In 597 AD, monks, led by
Augustine of Canterbury Augustine of Canterbury (early 6th century – probably 26 May 604) was a monk A monk (, from el, μοναχός, ''monachos'', "single, solitary" via Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language A classical language i ...

Augustine of Canterbury
, arrived at Ebbsfleet on the
Isle of Thanet The Isle of Thanet () is a peninsula at the most easterly point of Kent, England. While in the past it was separated from the mainland by the Wantsum Channel, it is no longer an island. Archaeological remains testify to its settlement in ancie ...

Isle of Thanet
, on a mission from
Pope Gregory
Pope Gregory
to re-Christianise Britain. He was greeted by the Anglo Saxon pagan King of Kent, Ethelbert and his Christian Queen,
Bertha Bertha is a female Germanic name Germanic languages, Germanic given names are traditionally wikt:dithematic, dithematic; that is, they are formed from two elements, by joining a prefix and a suffix. For example, Ethelred II of England, King Æþ ...
. Augustine was granted land in Canterbury, where he built his church and outside the walls founded the monastery of St Peter & St Paul, now known as St Augustine's. Ethelbert was succeeded as Anglo-Saxon king of Kent by his son Eadbald, whose daughter Eanswythe refused all offers of marriage. In 630, Eanswythe founded a nunnery on the site of her father's castle near Folkestone by the present parish church of St Mary & St Eanswythe. Eanswythe died around 640 and was quickly made a saint. Her remains were moved into the chancel of the current church on 12 September 1138, which has since then been commemorated as the Feast of St Eanswythe. They became the focus of prayer and pilgrimage such that Eanswythe was quickly adopted as the town's patron. The community grew and developed into a monastery until it was dissolved by
Henry VIII Henry VIII (28 June 149128 January 1547) was King of England from 22 April 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry is best known for Wives of Henry VIII, his six marriages, including his efforts to have his first marriage (to Catherine of Aragon ...

Henry VIII
, and St Eanswythe's remains disappeared. They were rediscovered in June 1885 when workmen, carrying out alterations to the high altar, found a battered lead casket immured in a niche in the north wall of the chancel. Examination by archaeologists at the time and again in 1981 confirmed that the casket was of Anglo-Saxon origin and the few bone fragments were those of a woman in her early thirties. The relics are still housed in the church, close to where they were discovered, in the north wall of the chancel flanked by a pair of small brass candlesticks. St Eanswythe is celebrated on 12 September each year, the date on which her relics were moved to the present chancel. She also appears on the town's seal with
William Harvey William Harvey (1 April 1578 – 3 June 1657) was an English physician who made influential contributions in anatomy Anatomy (Greek ''anatomē'', 'dissection') is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organis ...

William Harvey
, the Folkestone-born 17th-century physician who discovered the circulation of the blood. A
Norman Norman or Normans may refer to: Ethnic and cultural identity * The Normans The Normans (Norman language, Norman: ''Normaunds''; french: Normands; la, Nortmanni/Normanni) were inhabitants of the early medieval Duchy of Normandy, descended from ...

Norman
knight held a Barony of Folkestone, which led to its entry as a part of the
Cinque Ports The Confederation of Cinque Ports () is a historic group of coastal towns in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictio ...
in the thirteenth century and with that the privilege of being a wealthy trading port. At the start of the
Tudor period The Tudor period occurred between 1485 and 1603 in England and Wales England and Wales () is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom, parts of the United Kingdom. England and Wales forms ...
it had become a town in its own right. Wars with France meant that defences had to be built here and soon plans for a
Folkestone Harbour Folkestone Harbour is the main harbour of the town of Folkestone in Kent, England. History In 1541, Henry VIII of England, King Henry was about to wage a war against the French. A plan was made to use Folkestone as a port of embarkation to suppl ...
began. At the beginning of the 1800s a harbour was developed, but it was the coming of the railways in 1843 that would have the bigger impact. Dover Hill, which is the highest point in Folkestone, was a sighting point for the
Anglo-French Survey (1784–1790) The Anglo-French Survey (1784–1790) was the survey to measure the relative situation of Greenwich Observatory The Royal Observatory, Greenwich (ROG; known as the Old Royal Observatory from 1957 to 1998, when the working Royal Greenw ...
, which measured the precise distance between the
Royal Greenwich Observatory The Royal Observatory, Greenwich (ROG; known as the Old Royal Observatory from 1957 to 1998, when the working Royal Greenwich Observatory, RGO, temporarily moved south from Greenwich to Herstmonceux Herstmonceux ( , ) is a village and ci ...
and the
Paris Observatory #REDIRECT Paris Observatory #REDIRECT Paris Observatory The Paris Observatory (french: Observatoire de Paris ), a research institution of the Paris Sciences et Lettres University, is the foremost astronomy, astronomical observatory of France, a ...

Paris Observatory
. The hill provided a sight-line to the east along the line of the Folkestone Turnpike to
Dover Castle Dover Castle is a medieval castle in Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary, L. Brookes ...

Dover Castle
, one of the two principal cross-channel observation points, the other being
FairlightFairlight may refer to: In places: * Fairlight, East Sussex, a village east of Hastings in southern England, UK * Fairlight, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney, Australia * Fairlight, Saskatchewan, Canada In other uses: * Fairlight (company), an A ...
Down in Sussex.


Folkestone Harbour

Until the 19th century Folkestone remained a small fishing community with a seafront that was continually battered by storms and encroaching shingle that made it hard to land boats. In 1807 an
Act of Parliament Acts of parliament, sometimes referred to as primary legislation, are texts of law passed by the Legislature, legislative body of a jurisdiction (often a parliament or council). In most countries, acts of parliament begin as a Bill (law), bill, wh ...
was passed to build a pier and harbour which was built by
Thomas Telford Thomas Telford Royal Society of London, FRS, Royal Society of Edinburgh, FRSE (9 August 1757 – 2 September 1834) was a Scottish civil engineer. After establishing himself as an engineer of road and canal projects in Shropshire, he designed num ...
in 1809. By 1820 a harbour area of had been enclosed. Folkestone's trade and population grew slightly but development was still hampered by sand and silt from the Pent Stream. The Folkestone Harbour Company invested heavily in removing the silt but with little success. In 1842 the company became bankrupt and the Government put the derelict harbour up for sale. It was bought by the South Eastern Railway (SER), which was then building the London to Dover railway line. George Turnbull was responsible in 1844 for building the Horn pier. Dredging the harbour, and the construction of a rail route down to it, began almost immediately, and the town soon became the SER's principal packet station for the Continental traffic to
Boulogne Boulogne-sur-Mer (; pcd, Boulonne-su-Mér; nl, Bonen; la, Gesoriacum or ''Bononia''), often called just Boulogne (, ), is a coastal city in Hauts-de-France, Northern France. It is a Subprefectures in France, sub-prefecture of the Departments ...

Boulogne
. The last ferry ran in 2001. The Harbour Arm, formerly used solely for port activities, has been extensively restored and developed as a recreational space and promenade to which the public has access, including bars and restaurants, with entertainment at weekends and on some evenings. The former railway station and harbour viaduct have been reconstructed as a now successful public walkway and promenade, following the full closure of the branch railway in 2014.


Toponymy

Although Kent was the first part of the British mainland to be conquered and settled by the invading Angles, Saxons and Jutes from the middle of the 5th century AD onwards after the departure of the Romans, it was not until the late 7th century that the spelling ''Folcanstan'' appears. There is general agreement that this means ''Folca's stone'', the stone possibly marking the meeting place of the local
hundred 100 or one hundred (Roman numerals, Roman numeral: C) is the natural number following 99 (number), 99 and preceding 101 (number), 101. In medieval contexts, it may be described as the short hundred or five 20 (number), score in order to different ...
. It was not until the mid 19th century that the spelling of "Folkestone" was fixed as such, with the
Earl of Radnor Earl of Radnor is a title which has been created twice. It was first created in the Peerage of England The Peerage of England comprises all peerage A peerage is a legal system historically comprising various hereditary title Hereditary ...
requesting that the town's name be standardised (although this tendency towards standardisation in the 19th century is true of English place names generally). Folkestone is often misspelt, variants including Folkston, Folkstone & Folkeston.


Governance

The governance of Folkestone lies in both national and local government. Insofar as national government is concerned, Folkestone is part of the constituency of
Folkestone and HytheFolkestone and Hythe can refer to: * Folkestone and Hythe District * Folkestone and Hythe (UK Parliament constituency) {{disambiguation ...
, which is currently (2019) represented by
Damian Collins Damian Noel Thomas Collins (born 4 February 1974) is a British Conservative Party politician. He has been the Member of Parliament A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the people who live in their constituency. In many co ...
(Conservative). Prior to
Brexit Brexit (; a portmanteau of "British exit") was the Withdrawal from the European Union, withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) and the European Atomic Energy Community (EAEC or Euratom) at 23:00 31 January 2020 Green ...

Brexit
in 2020, Folkestone was part of the
South East England South East England is one of the nine official regions of England at the ITL 1 statistical regions of England, first level of International Territorial Level, ITL for Statistics, statistical purposes. It consists of the counties of england, ...
constituency in the
European Parliament The European Parliament (EP) is one of three Legislature, legislative branches of the European Union and one of its seven Institutions of the European Union, institutions. Together with the Council of the European Union, it adopts European legi ...

European Parliament
. The local government consists of three tiers. In the first tier,
Kent County Council Kent County Council is a county council that governs most of the non-metropolitan county, county of Kent in England. It is the upper tier of elected local government, below which are 12 non-metropolitan district, district councils, and around ...
, Folkestone is divided into two divisions each returning one County
Councillor A councillor is a member of a local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration is the implementation of public policy, government policy and also an academic disciplin ...

Councillor
. Folkestone West is represented by Cllr David Monk (Conservative). Folkestone East is represented by Dick Pascoe. The second tier of local government is the
non-metropolitan district Non-metropolitan districts, or colloquially "shire districts", are a type of local government district The districts of England (also known as local authority districts or local government districts to distinguish from unofficial city distri ...
. Folkestone forms a part of
Folkestone and HytheFolkestone and Hythe can refer to: * Folkestone and Hythe District * Folkestone and Hythe (UK Parliament constituency) {{disambiguation ...
district, which was first established by the
Local Government Act 1972 The Local Government Act 1972 (c. 70) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom The Parliament of the United Kingdom is the supreme legislative body A legislature is an assembly Assembly may refer to: Organisations and ...
as Shepway. Folkestone elects 10 of Folkestone and Hythe District Council's 30 Councillors. The third and lowest tier was established as the
civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration is the implementation of public policy, gove ...
: in Folkestone's case, because it held a
Town Charter A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document A document is a writing, written, drawing, drawn, presented, or memorialized representation of thought, often the manifestation of nonfiction, non-fictional, as ...

Town Charter
, and when the then Folkestone Borough Council was abolished, councillors elected to represent Folkestone's wards were designated as the Town's
Charter Trustees In England and Wales England and Wales () is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom, parts of the United Kingdom. England and Wales forms the constitutional successor to the former Kingdom o ...
, responsible for electing a Town Mayor. This role has since passed to Folkestone Town Council which is based at Folkestone Town Hall. Folkestone
Town Council A town council, city council or municipal council is a form of local government for small municipalities A municipality is usually a single administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country su ...
was established in 2004, comprising the area of the former
Borough A borough is an administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, administrative region, subnational entity, first-level subdivision, as well as many similar terms, are generic names for ...
of Folkestone less Folkestone Sandgate ward, which was separately parished. Folkestone Town Council comprises eight wards: Cheriton; Morehall; Park; Harvey West; Harvey Central; Harbour; East; and Foord. Each ward returns two or three members, for a total of 18 councillors elected to four-year terms. Each year, Folkestone Town Councillors attend the
Annual General Meeting An annual general meeting (AGM, also known as the annual meeting) is a meeting A meeting is when two or more people A people is a plurality of person A person (plural people or persons) is a being that has certain capacities or att ...
and Mayor-making ceremony to appoint both a Town Mayor and a Deputy Mayor from their number for the coming year.


Geography

Folkestone is located where the southern edge of the
North Downs The North Downs are a ridge of chalk Chalk is a soft, white, porous Porosity or void fraction is a measure of the (i.e. "empty") spaces in a , and is a of voids over the total volume, between 0 and 1, or as a between 0% and 100%. Stric ...
, escarpment meets the sea. In contrast to the white cliffs at
Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first publishe ...

Dover
further to the east, the cliffs at Folkestone are composed of
greensand Greensand or green sand is a sand Sand is a granular material composed of finely divided rock (geology), rock and mineral particles. Sand has various compositions but is defined by its grain size. Sand grains are smaller than gravel and co ...

greensand
belonging to the Folkestone Formation and
gault clay The Gault Formation is a geological formation A geological formation, or formation, is a body of rock having a consistent set of physical characteristics () that distinguish it from adjacent bodies of rock, and which occupies a particular posit ...
. A small stream, Pent Brook, cuts through the cliffs at this point, and provided the original haven for fishermen and cross-channel boats. The cliffs are constantly under attack from the sea: the original headlands, which once protected the port, ceased to do so, and artificial protection, in the form of breakwaters and piers, have been necessary since the 17th century. The town is now built on both sides of the original valley: the West Cliff and ''The Bayle'' to the West, and the East Cliff on the other side of the stream. The Pent Stream now runs through a culvert from the fire station, at the junction of Radnor Park Road, Park Farm and Pavilion Road, until it reaches the inner harbour. Remains of a quay, dating to the 17th century, were discovered under what is now a public car park, between the Old High Street and the railway viaduct, adjacent to the current harbour. Included in the town is Cheriton, where the
Channel Tunnel The Channel Tunnel (also referred to as the Chunnel) is a railway tunnel A tunnel is an underground passageway, dug through the surrounding soil/earth/rock and enclosed except for entrance and exit, commonly at each end. A pipeline ...
northern exit is located; Newington; and
Peene The Peene () is a river A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases, a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without r ...
. In August 1996 a one in 600 years storm left homes and businesses in Black Bull Road, in the Foord Valley, under two metres of water. Heavy rainfall combined with inadequacies in the Pent Stream and local drainage to cause the flooding. A crowd of 2,332 saw Folkestone Invicta play hosts to West Ham United in a benefit game following the flood.


Climate


Industry

Folkestone was at one stage a resort town with a developed shipping trade. With the decline of such industries others have filled the gap. The
Dormobile Dormobile is a 1960s-era onwards campervan A campervan (or camper van), sometimes referred to as a camper, caravanette, or motor caravan, is a self-propelled vehicle that provides both transport and sleeping accommodation. The term mainly des ...
works, car conversion manufacturers were based in the town.
Church and Dwight Church & Dwight Co., Inc., is a major American manufacturer of household products that is headquartered in Ewing, New Jersey. While it manufactures many products, it is best known for its Arm & Hammer (brand), Arm & Hammer line which includes So ...
, the US company famous for such brands as
Arm & Hammer Arm & Hammer is a brand of baking soda-based consumer products marketed by Church & Dwight, a major American manufacturer of household products. The logo of the brand depicts the ancient symbol of a arm-and-hammer symbol, muscular arm holding a ...
, has its UK headquarters in the town.
Silver Spring Mineral Water Company Limited Silver Spring Soft Drinks Ltd was a commercial limited company that produced a range of soft drinks from its factory and headquarters at Folkestone Folkestone ( ) is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The tow ...
, until recently the largest independently owned soft drinks manufacturer in Britain, was based in Park Farm but closed down in 2013. During the 1980s and 1990s the construction of the Channel Tunnel provided employment, as well as bringing many people to the area, and on completion the running of service still provides work for many. Several insurance firms are based in Folkestone. Some of them used to be involved in the shipping trade but have since diversified into other fields.
Saga Sagas are prose Prose is a form of written (or spoken) language that usually exhibits a natural speech, natural flow of speech and Syntax, grammatical structure—an exception is the narrative device stream of consciousness. The word "prose" f ...
has its headquarters in Folkestone.


Main sights

The major landmark in Folkestone, apart from the harbour, is the Leas, the cliffs above the beach. The Leas: Located in the West part of the town. The Leas is a unique promenade designed in the mid 1800 by Decimus Burton who also worked on Regents Park and Saint Leonards by the sea. The promenade along the sea includes many crescents, hotels, private parks and alley: A
Martello Tower Martello towers, sometimes known simply as Martellos, are small defensive forts A fortification is a military A military, also known collectively as armed forces, is a heavily armed, highly organized force primarily intended for ...

Martello Tower
(No 3) stands on the cliff above Copt Point. Built in 1806 as a defence against
Napoleon Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French military and political leader. He rose to prominence during the French Revolution The French Revolution ( ) refers to the period that began with the Estates General o ...

Napoleon
, it has also been a
Coast Guard A coast guard or coastguard is a maritime security Maritime may refer to: Geography * Maritime Alps, a mountain range in the southwestern part of the Alps * Maritime Region, a region in Togo * Maritime Southeast Asia * The Maritimes ...
lookout, a family home, a golf clubhouse and a
Second World War World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a global war A world war is "a war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literatur ...
Naval mine A naval mine is a self-contained explosive An explosive (or explosive material) is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion An explosion is a rapid expansion in volume assoc ...
control post. It now houses a visitor centre. The
Folkestone White Horse
Folkestone White Horse
is carved on
Cheriton Hill
Cheriton Hill
above the Channel Tunnel terminal. The
Kent Downs The Kent Downs is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB; ; AHNE) is an area of rural area, countryside in England, Wales or Northern Ireland that has been designated for protected area, conservation ...
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB; ; AHNE) is an area of rural area, countryside in England, Wales or Northern Ireland that has been designated for protected area, conservation due to its significant landscape value. Areas are design ...
includes part of the town area. The nearby Brockhill Country Park, to the west, with footpaths around a lake and in a valley, links with the
Royal Military Canal The Royal Military Canal is a canal running for between Seabrook near Folkestone and Cliff End near Hastings, following the old cliff line bordering Romney Marsh, which was constructed as a defence against the Napoleon's planned invasion of t ...
at
Hythe Hythe, from Anglo-Saxon ''hȳð'', may refer to a landing-place, port or haven, either as an element in a toponym, such as Rotherhithe in London, or to: Places Australia * Hythe, Tasmania Southport is a small township in far south Tasmania, ...
. Folkestone is near to two important
Battle of Britain The Battle of Britain (german: die Luftschlacht um England, "the Air Battle for England") was a military campaign A military campaign is large-scale long-duration significant military strategy Military strategy is a set of ideas implemented ...

Battle of Britain
landmarks – the
Battle of Britain Memorial, Capel-le-Ferne The Battle of Britain Memorial is a monument to aircrew who flew in the Battle of Britain. It is sited on the White Cliffs of Dover, White Cliffs at Capel-le-Ferne, near Folkestone, on the coast of Kent. History It was initiated by the Battle of ...
and the
Kent Battle of Britain Museum The Kent Battle of Britain Museum is an aviation museum An aviation museum, air museum, or air and space museum is a museum exhibiting the history and cultural artifacts, artifacts of aviation. In addition to actual, replica or accurate rep ...
– the oldest Battle of Britain Museum in the UK. The Old High Street is an ancient route connecting the Bayle with the Harbour now at the heart of Folkestone's Creative Quarter. The narrow, cobbled slope was one of Charles Dickens' favourite streets. Together with Rendezvous street, this part of Folkestone is now thriving with independent businesses and restaurants surrounded by colourful restored buildings .


Transport

Folkestone developed because of its transport links. With France visible across the
Strait of Dover The Strait of Dover or Dover Strait, historically known as the Dover Narrows (french: Pas de Calais - ''Strait of Calais''; nl, Nauw van Calais or the lesser used ''Straat van Dover''), is the strait A strait is a naturally formed, nar ...
, the town became an important transit point for those travelling from the UK to the Continent. Talks about restoring the ferry traffic to
Boulogne Boulogne-sur-Mer (; pcd, Boulonne-su-Mér; nl, Bonen; la, Gesoriacum or ''Bononia''), often called just Boulogne (, ), is a coastal city in Hauts-de-France, Northern France. It is a Subprefectures in France, sub-prefecture of the Departments ...

Boulogne
since it was terminated in 2000 were held in 2005, but this has not been resolved; and the Channel Tunnel northern entrance is located at Cheriton.


Rail

The railway reached Folkestone on 28 June 1843 and a temporary railway station was built while the construction of the line to Dover continued. This started with the Foord viaduct, designed by Sir William Cubitt, completed in 1844. Folkestone Junction railway station was then opened and construction through the cliffs between Dover and Folkestone commenced. Once the line was opened to
Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first publishe ...

Dover
, the town began to prosper (which meant growth westwards), further stations were opened at Folkestone West (originally named ''Shorncliffe Camp'') in 1863, and Folkestone Central in 1884.
Folkestone Harbour Folkestone Harbour is the main harbour of the town of Folkestone in Kent, England. History In 1541, Henry VIII of England, King Henry was about to wage a war against the French. A plan was made to use Folkestone as a port of embarkation to supp ...
station was used to trans-ship whole trains; the line from the junction was very steep and needed much additional locomotive help. A local group, the Remembrance Line Association, is actively seeking to retain the harbour branch as a tourist/heritage railway operation. Today the domestic services from Folkestone use the Central and West stations on the
South Eastern Main Line The South Eastern Main Line is a major long-distance railway route in South East England, UK, one of the three main routes crossing the county of Kent, going via Sevenoaks railway station, Sevenoaks, Tonbridge railway station, Tonbridge, Ashford ...

South Eastern Main Line
.
Venice-Simplon Orient Express The ''Venice Simplon-Orient-Express'' (VSOE) is a private luxury train service from London to Venice and other European cities. It is currently owned by Belmond Limited, Belmond, which operates 45 luxury hotels, restaurants, tourist trains and ...
passengers now change at Folkestone West for road coaches and the onward journey through the
Channel Tunnel The Channel Tunnel (also referred to as the Chunnel) is a railway tunnel A tunnel is an underground passageway, dug through the surrounding soil/earth/rock and enclosed except for entrance and exit, commonly at each end. A pipeline ...
.
High Speed 1 High Speed 1 (HS1), legally the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL), is a high-speed rail High-speed rail (HSR) is a type of rail transport that runs significantly faster than traditional rail traffic, using an integrated system of specialis ...

High Speed 1
(HS1) is a high speed railway built to French 'LGV' (Ligne à Grande Vitesse) standards, connecting the Channel Tunnel to London. Since December 2009, high speed commuter services from Dover have called at Folkestone and then, using the South Eastern Main Line to
Ashford International Ashford International railway station is a National Rail National Rail (NR) in Great Britain is the Trade name, trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group, an unincorporated association whose membership consists of the pass ...
, the services join HS1 for the journey to Ebbsfleet, Stratford International and
London St Pancras St Pancras railway station (), also known as London St Pancras or St Pancras International and officially since 2007 as London St Pancras International, is a London station group, central London railway terminus on Euston Road in the London Bor ...

London St Pancras
. The journey time to London via this route has been reduced to under 1 hour; some trains from Folkestone West take as little as 52 minutes to reach the capital by High Speed Train. The
Eurotunnel Shuttle Eurotunnel Le Shuttle (sometimes shortened to Le Shuttle or The Shuttle) is a railway shuttle service between Coquelles Coquelles ( vls, Kalkwelle, lang) is a commune A commune is an intentional community of people sharing living sp ...

Eurotunnel Shuttle
terminal, for car transport to
Calais Calais ( , , traditionally , ; pcd, Calés; vls, Kales) is a city A city is a large .Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia ...

Calais
by train using the Channel Tunnel, is in the Folkestone suburb of Cheriton. The
Leas Lift The Leas Lift is a grade II* listed funicular railway that carries passengers between the seafront and the promenade in Folkestone, Kent. Originally installed in 1885, it is one of the oldest water lifts in the UK. The lift operates using water ...
, a Victorian water lift that opened in 1885, connects the Leas with the beach. There were two other lifts on the Leas in Folkestone history: the Metropole Lift (closed in 1940) and the Sandgate Hill Lift, which closed in 1918.


Roads

The town is located at the eastern end of the M20 which provides fast access to
Ashford Ashford is a relatively common English placename: it goes back to Old English ''æscet'', indicating a ford near a clump of ash trees. Places Australia *Ashford, New South Wales *Ashford, South Australia *Electoral district of Ashford, South Aust ...
,
Maidstone Maidstone is the largest town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...
,
London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller lowerc ...

London
and also to the
M25M25 or M-25 may be: Aerospace * M-25 Dromader Mikro, a variant of the Polish PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader agricultural aircraft * Cors-Air M25Y Black Devil, an Italian aircraft engine * Shvetsov M-25, an aircraft radial engine produced in the Soviet Un ...
. The A20 is motorway-standard to
Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first publishe ...

Dover
and runs locally towards Ashford and London, following the M20 but runs locally via
Sellindge Sellindge is a civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration is the impl ...
, Ashford,
Lenham Lenham is a market village and civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administr ...
,
Maidstone Maidstone is the largest town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...
,
Aylesford Aylesford is a village and civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration ...
,
Wrotham Wrotham ( ) is a village on the Pilgrims' Way in Kent, England, at the foot of the North Downs. It is north of Borough Green and approximately east of Sevenoaks. It is between the M20 motorway, M20 and M26 motorway, M26 motorways. History Th ...
and
Swanley Swanley is a town and civil parishes in England, civil parish in the Sevenoaks District of Kent, England. It is located approximately southeast of central London, adjacent to the Greater London boundary and within the M25 motorway periphery. T ...
where the A20, M20 and M25 meet and the A20 continues through
Sidcup Sidcup is an area of south-east London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a ...
and
Lewisham Lewisham () is an area of south east London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the he ...

Lewisham
to
Central London Central London is the innermost part of London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the ...
. Folkestone marks the eastern end of the A259 although this is no longer part of the South Coast Trunk Road east of Brenzett, although it remains a primary route. The road gives access to the
Romney Marsh Romney Marsh is a sparsely populated wetland area in the counties Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. It covers about . The Marsh has been in use for centuries, though its inhabitants commonly suffered from malaria until the 18th ...
,
Hastings Hastings () is a seaside town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...

Hastings
,
Eastbourne Eastbourne () is a town and seaside resort in East Sussex East Sussex is a county in South East England on the English Channel The English Channel,, "The Sleeve"; nrf, la Maunche, "The Sleeve" ( Cotentinais) or (Jèrriais), (Guer ...

Eastbourne
and beyond. To the north, roads connect Folkestone to
Canterbury Canterbury (, ) is a City status in the United Kingdom, cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, situated in the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour, Kent, River Stour ...

Canterbury
and the nearby villages of
ElhamElham or Ilham may refer to: * Elham (given name) * Elham, Kent * Elham railway station * Elham Deanery * Elham Valley Railway * Elham Valley Surname * Gholam-Hossein Elham, Iranian politician * Muhammad Ilham (born 1981), Indonesian footballer ...
and
Lyminge Lyminge is a village in southeast Kent, England. It lies about five miles (8 km) from Folkestone and the Channel Tunnel, on the road passing through the Elham Valley. At the 2011 Census the population of Etchinghill, Kent, Etchinghill was i ...
.
Stagecoach in East Kent Stagecoach South East is the trading name of East Kent Road Car Company Limited, a bus operator based in Canterbury Canterbury (, ) is a City status in the United Kingdom, cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, situated in the heart ...
operates local buses from the town. It is served by The Link services to
Canterbury Canterbury (, ) is a City status in the United Kingdom, cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, situated in the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour, Kent, River Stour ...

Canterbury
, The Wave service to
Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first publishe ...

Dover
,
Romney Marsh Romney Marsh is a sparsely populated wetland area in the counties Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. It covers about . The Marsh has been in use for centuries, though its inhabitants commonly suffered from malaria until the 18th ...
and
Hastings Hastings () is a seaside town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...

Hastings
. Other bus routes run to
Hythe Hythe, from Anglo-Saxon ''hȳð'', may refer to a landing-place, port or haven, either as an element in a toponym, such as Rotherhithe in London, or to: Places Australia * Hythe, Tasmania Southport is a small township in far south Tasmania, ...
,
Ashford Ashford is a relatively common English placename: it goes back to Old English ''æscet'', indicating a ford near a clump of ash trees. Places Australia *Ashford, New South Wales *Ashford, South Australia *Electoral district of Ashford, South Aust ...
and
Maidstone Maidstone is the largest town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...
.
National Express National Express Group is a British multinational public transport company headquartered in Birmingham Birmingham ( ) is a city A city is a large human settlement.Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. Lond ...
runs coaches to Ashford, Dover, Hythe,
Maidstone Maidstone is the largest town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...
and London.


Education

Schools and colleges in Folkestone include
Folkestone Academy Folkestone Academy is a 4–19 mixed all-through school with academy status in Folkestone Folkestone ( ) is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The town lies on the southern edge of the North Downs at a valley ...
(formed by the merger of Hillside School for Boys and Holywell School for Girls in the early 1970s, and formerly known as Wyndgate Secondary School in the 1970s, the Channel High School in the 1980s, and the Channel School in the 1990s); and Turner Free School (opened in 2018 on the site of Pent Valley Technology College, formerly Pent Valley Secondary Modern, formed by the merger of Harcourt Secondary School for Girls and Morehall Secondary School for Boys in the 1970s). There are two selective state secondary schools – Folkestone School for Girls (formed by the merger of Folkestone Technical High School for Girls and Folkestone Grammar School for Girls in the 1980s) and the Harvey Grammar School for boys; the latter was founded in 1674. These two schools have a common sixth form timetable. East Kent College have a Folkestone campus providing a variety of courses including Apprenticeships, Hairdressing and Construction. From 2007 to 2013 the University Centre Folkestone (a joint initiative of Canterbury Christ Church University and University of Greenwich) was located in the town providing a specialism in Performing Arts. There are a number of primary schools, both state and independent, in the town. State primaries include Folkestone Primary, Sandgate Primary, Morehall Academy and Martello Grove Academy, a new academy that opened in September 2015. Martello Grove Academy moved to brand new buildings on its campus in Warren Way in the fall 2016.


Leisure

The town is situated at the foot of the
North Downs The North Downs are a ridge of chalk Chalk is a soft, white, porous Porosity or void fraction is a measure of the (i.e. "empty") spaces in a , and is a of voids over the total volume, between 0 and 1, or as a between 0% and 100%. Stric ...
, with views of the surrounding countryside and the coast of France, away. The area is a magnet for passing migrating birds and the Warren (woodlands adjoining Wear Bay) and the cliffs above are of particular interest during the spring and autumn periods. These are now part of East Cliff and Warren Country Park. Folkestone Parks and Pleasure Grounds Charities are lands which were donated to the people of Folkestone for perpetual recreational use by the Earl of Radnor, Earls of Radnor during the 19th century. The lands are administered by Shepway District Council, with the Cabinet members forming the Board of Trustees. Previously, the Charter Trustees were also Trustees of the Charities, but that arrangement lapsed upon the parishing of the Folkestone and Sandgate area. Negotiations are ongoing regarding the transfer of the lands to Folkestone Town Council and Sandgate Parish Council. There are two major long distance footpaths through the town. The North Downs Way, starting its course in Surrey, reaches the coast at Folkestone and continues through Capel-le-Ferne, and to its end at
Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first publishe ...

Dover
, some away. The Saxon Shore Way starts at Gravesend, Kent, Gravesend, Kent and traces the Kent coast as it was in Roman Empire, Roman times, via Folkestone, as far as
Hastings Hastings () is a seaside town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origi ...

Hastings
, East Sussex, 163 miles (262 km) in total. Nearby places of interest include the
Kent Battle of Britain Museum The Kent Battle of Britain Museum is an aviation museum An aviation museum, air museum, or air and space museum is a museum exhibiting the history and cultural artifacts, artifacts of aviation. In addition to actual, replica or accurate rep ...
and the
Battle of Britain Memorial, Capel-le-Ferne The Battle of Britain Memorial is a monument to aircrew who flew in the Battle of Britain. It is sited on the White Cliffs of Dover, White Cliffs at Capel-le-Ferne, near Folkestone, on the coast of Kent. History It was initiated by the Battle of ...
.


Culture

Folkestone has been home to many galleries over the years. The long-established Metropole Galleries, located in the one-time Metropole Hotel on the Leas, staged year round exhibitions until it closed in 2008. Its place has been largely taken by the Creative Foundation. The Foundation has opened a medium scale theatre, conference and music venue in the heart of the Creative Quarter named Quarterhouse. It offers a year-round programme of live music, comedy, film, talks, theatre and children's entertainment. George's House Gallery and Googie's Art Cafe hold frequent exhibitions by local artists and the Folkestone Art Society, established in 1928, holds three annual art exhibitions and publishes an annual art review of work by local artists. Leas Cliff Hall is the biggest entertainment and function venue in Folkestone with a large choice of concerts, comedy and theatre. An earlier venue the Pleasure Gardens Theatre opened in 1886, later converting into a cinema before closing in 1964. The first Folkestone Triennial art event took place between June and September 2008 with artists such as Christian Boltanski and Tracey Emin making site specific work for a wide variety of locations around the town. Many of the commissioned works remain permanently in the town. The 2011 Triennial 'A Million Miles From Home' was launched on 24 September 2010 and commissioned 19 international artists to develop new works for Folkestone's streets, squares, beaches and historic buildings to create a cutting-edge contemporary art exhibition in the public domain. Folkestone has an annual Chamber Music Festival each May curated by the Sacconi Quartet. The festival is based in the town's 13th century Parish Church of St Mary and St Eanswythe in the Bayle and comprises concerts of chamber and ensemble music with guest performers. The church also hosts a series of Sunday afternoon concerts under the auspices of Bayle Music presenting local, national and international performers as well as occasional concerts by visiting choirs and ensembles. Folkestone New Music promotes concerts of contemporary music and Folkestone Early Music explores music, from medieval to baroque, through a year-round programme of concerts, talks and workshops. Folkestone, together with
Hythe Hythe, from Anglo-Saxon ''hȳð'', may refer to a landing-place, port or haven, either as an element in a toponym, such as Rotherhithe in London, or to: Places Australia * Hythe, Tasmania Southport is a small township in far south Tasmania, ...
, has an amateur theatre group: Folkestone & Hythe Operatic & Dramatic Society. It is a charitable organisation, producing and performing several different shows a year at its own venue, the The Tower Theatre (Folkestone, Kent), Tower Theatre, located in Cheriton, Kent, Shorncliffe. The society also has a youth section, which puts on three performances a year at the Tower Theatre: the Brigadier Thomas Memorial Competition, a summer show and a Christmas revue. The literary journal ''The Frogmore Papers'', published by the Frogmore Press, was founded in Folkestone in 1983. The Folkestone Book Festival takes place every November. Folkestone Museum, which holds a collection of fossils, archaeological remains and paintings relocated to Folkestone Town Hall in spring 2017. Folkestone has an annual ''Comic Convention'' each May organised by ''Planet Folkestone''. The convention is a volunteer-run event which raising funds for local charities including Academy FM, East Kent Hospitals and Help for Heroes. Each year more than 7,000 people attend the event, which brings celebrities from TV and film to the coastal town. Folkestone Film, TV and Comic Con 2016 had many actors attending including the television actors Sylvester McCoy and Peter Davison from Dr Who and Julian Glover from Game of Thrones. The 2018 event took place at the iconic Leas Cliff Hall. Folkestone is home to the 'Hellfire Film Festival' that runs throughout the year at various locations. An annual ''Zombie Walk'' also takes place in Folkestone around Halloween with permission from Shepway District Council. The walk is a fun and safe way for adults and children to celebrate Halloween and has a larger and larger following every year. In 2016, in the event's 6th year, the organisers "''Planet Folkestone''" announced that they were stepping down from organising the free event as they could no longer commit their own time and resources to the event due to its ever-increasing costs and restrictions. Strange Cargo was established in Folkestone in 1995. The group put on a number of annual events including the Cheriton Light Festival in the winter and Charivari Day, a street parade taking place in July which all local schools are invited to take part in.


Local media


Newspapers

Folkestone has two paid-for newspapers, ''Folkestone and Hythe Express'' (a weekly title published by the KM Group). It was previously part of the Kentish Express series but relaunched in October 2013 and is part of the KM Group's portfolio which also includes KentOnline.co.uk. And ''Folkestone Herald'' (published by Kent Regional News and Media, part of the Local World group). There is also a monthly paid magazine ''Folkestone, Hythe & Romney Life''. Free newspapers for the town include the ''Folkestone and Hythe Extra'', part of the KM Group; and ''yourshepway'', part of KOS Media. Kent Regional News and Media previously published the ''Folkestone Adscene'', but this was merged with the paid for ''Herald'' in 2008.


Magazine

Following the monthly magazine ''The Quarter'', which ran from 2003 to 2005, a new arts magazine ''Folkestone Creative'' has been published locally since 2005. It reviews events and developments throughout Folkestone, Hythe and the villages nearby. Digital design magazine ''DesignFizz'' (thedesignfizz.com) was founded in 2014 in Folkestone.


Radio

A 24-hour community radio station, Academy FM (Folkestone), began broadcasting in March 2011 on 105.9FM. The station's licence has been renewed for a further five-year period from 2016. It broadcasts from the
Folkestone Academy Folkestone Academy is a 4–19 mixed all-through school with academy status in Folkestone Folkestone ( ) is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The town lies on the southern edge of the North Downs at a valley ...
. Folkestone is also served by the county-wide stations Heart Kent, Heart, KMFM (radio network), Gold (radio), Gold and BBC Radio Kent. KMFM Shepway and White Cliffs Country, used to broadcast to Folkestone on 96.4FM. The station was founded in Dover as Neptune Radio in September 1997 but moved to Folkestone in 2003 after being rebranded following a takeover by the KM Group. The studios were moved again, to Ashford, in 2009. Which went fully county-wide in January 2011.


Sport

Folkestone Invicta, Folkestone Invicta Football Club was formed in 1936 and played in the Eastern Section of the Kent Amateur League (now the Kent County League), taking over the Cheriton Road ground in early 1991 after the demise of the old Folkestone F.C. which had had a long history in the Southern League. Folkestone Rugby Club was formed in 1974 and currently play in London and SE league 4. The club runs 4 Adult, a ladies, and various colts teams. A former ladies player, Catherine Spencer, captained the England women's national rugby union team to a grand slam in 2008. Folkestone Cricket Club currently competes in the first division of the Kent Cricket League. It was formed in 1851. Current Kent players such as Robbie Joseph and Geraint Jones plus Neil Dexter, who moved to Middlesex CCC at the end of the 2008 season, have all represented the club. James Tredwell, who came through the youth academy, is still heavily involved with the club. Folkestone is home to one of the most prominent Motorcycle Grasstrack clubs – Astra. Their meetings take place at Swingfield Minnis and over the years have hosted a number of championship meetings. In 2007 and 2016 they hosted the European Grasstrack Championship finals and well as the Team Long Track World Championship Team Cup in 2013. They have hosted the major Domestic championship – the British Masters – in 2000, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2014. Folkestone Optimist Hockey Club are based at Three Hills Sports Park (along with the cricket and netball clubs). There is a Bowls Club and a Running Club based in the town. Folkestone hosted the 5th Chess Olympiad in 1933. Among others, the artist Marcel Duchamp took part as a member of the French team.


People

There are a large number of people with connections to the town who have made themselves important in one sphere or another. Men such as
William Harvey William Harvey (1 April 1578 – 3 June 1657) was an English physician who made influential contributions in anatomy Anatomy (Greek ''anatomē'', 'dissection') is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organis ...

William Harvey
and his father Thomas Harvey Mayor in 1600 here, discoverer of the circulation of the blood; and Samuel Plimsoll who invented the line named after him for ship safety. Walter Tull, the first black officer in the British army was born here. There have been many actors and actresses, David Tomlinson was brought up in the town, while others started their careers at Arthur Brough's Folkestone Repertory Company including Robert Arnold; comedians including Michael Bentine (who was in the local patrol of the Air Raid Precautions, ARP) and a large number of artists in various fields. Wilkie Collins, Radclyffe Hall, A. E. Coppard and Catherine Crowe were all writers; and there have also been musicians: Noel Redding among them. King Edward VII and his mistress Alice Keppel (great-grandmother of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall) regularly enjoyed the luxury (and discretion) of the Grand Hotel on the Leas. Eamon Everall, artist/educator and founder member of the Stuckism art movement, attended Harvey Grammar School and Folkestone School of Art and still maintains a base here. Actress June Brown still has two homes in the town. Jimmy Hill, presenter of ''Match of the Day'', was stationed at Folkestone Garrison during the Second World War, during which time he entertained troops and played for the local football team. The novelist Jocelyn Brooke, who died in 1966, wrote evocatively about Folkestone and Sandgate in his memoirs. Rosemary Stewart the Canadian insurance heiress resided here for an extended period, known for dedication to coastal swimming from the harbour. During her time she continued to increase her fortune by becoming a significant player in the rag trade. Former Prime Minister of New Zealand William Hall-Jones was born and raised in Folkestone.


Twin towns

Folkestone is Twin towns and sister cities, twinned with: * Boulogne-sur-Mer, France * Middelburg, Zeeland, Middelburg, Netherlands * Étaples, Étaples-sur-Mer, France * Tres de Febrero Partido, Tres de Febrero, Argentina * Mechinagar, Nepal


See also

* 2007 Kent Earthquake * Folkestone power station


References


Sources

*


External links


The Folkestone Warren Landslide
British Geological Survey {{Authority control Folkestone, Towns in Kent Ports and harbours of Kent Seaside resorts in England Ports and harbours of the English Channel Cinque ports Populated coastal places in Kent France–United Kingdom border crossings Beaches of Kent