HOME

TheInfoList




Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons (VP&S) is the graduate
medical school A medical school is a tertiary education Tertiary education, also referred to as third-level, third-stage or post-secondary education, is the education Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowled ...
of
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a Private university, private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of ...

Columbia University
, located at the
Columbia University Irving Medical Center NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center (NYP/CUIMC), also known as the Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC), is an academic medical center and the largest campus of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital The New York-P ...
in the
Washington HeightsWashington Heights may refer to: Places ;Japan *Washington Heights (Tokyo), a former US Army barracks and housing area during the occupation of Japan ;United States *Washington Heights, Chicago, Illinois *Washington Heights, New Jersey, Washingto ...
neighborhood of
Manhattan Manhattan (), known regionally as ''The City'', is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs 5 is a number, numeral, and glyph. 5, five or number 5 may also refer to: * AD 5, the fifth year of the AD era ...

Manhattan
. Founded in 1767 by Samuel Bard as the medical department of King's College (now
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a Private university, private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 as King's College on the grounds of ...

Columbia University
), VP&S was the first
medical school A medical school is a tertiary education Tertiary education, also referred to as third-level, third-stage or post-secondary education, is the education Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowled ...
in the
Thirteen Colonies The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies or the Thirteen American Colonies, were a group of Kingdom of Great Britain, British colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America. Founded in the 17th and 18th centuries, th ...
to award the
Doctor of Medicine Doctor of Medicine (abbreviated M.D., from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Lat ...
(MD) degree. Beginning in 1993, VP&S was also the first U.S. medical school to hold a
white coat ceremony The white coat ceremony (WCC) is a ritual in some Medical school, schools of medicine and other health-related fields that marks the student's transition from the study of preclinical to clinical health sciences. At some schools, where students beg ...
. According to ''
U.S. News & World Report ''U.S. News & World Report'' is an American media company that publishes news, opinion, consumer advice, rankings, and analysis. Founded as a news magazine in 1933, ''U.S. News'' transitioned to primarily web-based publishing in 2010, although it ...
'', VP&S is one of the most selective medical schools in the United States based on average
MCAT The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a computer-based standardized examination for prospective medical students A medical school is a tertiary educational institution, or part of such an institution, that teaches medicine, and awar ...
score,
GPA The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit SI derived units are units of measurement ' Measurement is the number, numerical quantification (science), quantification of the variable and attribute (research), attributes of an object or event ...
, and acceptance rate. In 2018, 7,537 people applied and 1,007 were interviewed for 140 seats in its entering MD class. The median undergraduate GPA and average MCAT score for successful applicants in 2014 were 3.82 and 36, respectively. Columbia is ranked fourth for research among American medical schools by ''U.S. News & World Report''. In 2018, Columbia became the first medical school in the nation to replace loans with scholarships for all students who qualify for financial aid. The scholarships are funded by an endowment that was established by Dr.
P. Roy Vagelos Pindaros Roy Vagelos (born October 8, 1929, in Westfield, New Jersey New Jersey is a U.S. state, state in the Mid-Atlantic States, Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States, Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered ...
and his wife Diana Vagelos; in December 2017, the 250-year-old medical school was renamed in their honor. The Vageloses committed more than $310 million to Columbia, $150 million of which was directed toward the scholarship fund. Columbia is affiliated with
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital The NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is a Nonprofit organization, nonprofit Academic health science centre, academic medical center in New York City affiliated with two List of Ivy League medical schools, Ivy League medical schools: Columbia Universit ...
, the nation's 4th-ranked hospital according to ''
U.S. News & World Report ''U.S. News & World Report'' is an American media company that publishes news, opinion, consumer advice, rankings, and analysis. Founded as a news magazine in 1933, ''U.S. News'' transitioned to primarily web-based publishing in 2010, although it ...
''. Students additionally rotate through its affiliate hospital in
Stamford Hospital Stamford Hospital, residing on the Bennett Medical Center campus, is a 305-bed, not-for-profit hospital and the central facility to the broader organization Stamford Health. While positioned as a comprehensive regional healthcare facility for Fair ...
in
Stamford, CT Stamford () is a city in the U.S. state In the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Contiguous United States, primarily located in North Americ ...
.


Curriculum

Beginning in the fall of 2009, the medical school implemented a new curriculum that differed markedly from more traditional structures. The largest change involved a reduction in the number of preclinical months from twenty-four to eighteen and the expansion of the electives and selectives period to fourteen months. Each student now is required to spend four to ten months working on a scholarly project before graduation.


Student life


Campus

Situated on land overlooking the
Hudson River The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York (state), New York in the United States. It originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley ...

Hudson River
and separated from Columbia's undergraduate campus in
Morningside Heights Morningside Heights is a Neighborhoods in Manhattan, neighborhood on the West Side, Manhattan, West Side of Upper Manhattan in New York City. It is bounded by Morningside Drive (Manhattan), Morningside Drive to the east, 125th Street (Manhattan ...

Morningside Heights
by approximately fifty blocks and the neighborhood of
Harlem Harlem is a neighborhood in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It is bounded roughly by Frederick Douglass Boulevard, St. Nicholas Avenue, and Morningside Park (Manhattan), Morningside Park on the west; the Harlem River and 155th Street (Manhattan) ...

Harlem
, the
Columbia University Medical Center NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center (NYP/CUIMC), also known as the Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC), is an academic medical center and the largest campus of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. It includes Col ...
has its own unique standing and identity. The campus comprises not only VP&S, but also the College of Dental Medicine (formerly the School of Dental and Oral Surgery), the School of Nursing, the Mailman School of Public Health, the Presbyterian portion of
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital The NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is a Nonprofit organization, nonprofit Academic health science centre, academic medical center in New York City affiliated with two List of Ivy League medical schools, Ivy League medical schools: Columbia Universit ...
(including the
Morgan Stanley Children's HospitalMorgan Stanley Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian (MSCH or CHONY) is a women's and children's hospital at 3959 Broadway, near West 165th Street, in the Washington Heights, Manhattan, Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York Cit ...
) and the
New York State Psychiatric Institute The New York State Psychiatric Institute, located at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center in the Washington Heights, Manhattan, Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was established in 1895 as one of the first instit ...
. Affiliated hospitals include
Harlem Hospital Harlem Hospital Center, branded as NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, is a 272-bed, public teaching hospital affiliated with Columbia University. It is located at 506 Lenox Avenue in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City and was founded in 1887. The hospi ...
,
Stamford Hospital Stamford Hospital, residing on the Bennett Medical Center campus, is a 305-bed, not-for-profit hospital and the central facility to the broader organization Stamford Health. While positioned as a comprehensive regional healthcare facility for Fair ...
in Stamford, Connecticut, and
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital (Bassett Medical Center) is a teaching hospital in Cooperstown Cooperstown is a village A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet (place), hamlet but smaller than a ...
in
Cooperstown, New York Cooperstown is a village A village is a clustered human settlement In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people live. The complexity of a settlement can range fro ...
. In August 2016 th
Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center
new 100,000-square-foot, 14-story glass medical education tower opened at 104 Haven Avenue, between 171st and 172nd Streets, near the northern tip of the campus. Housing options on Columbia's Medical Campus include Bard Hall and the Bard-Haven Towers, a complex of three, 31-story apartment buildings overlooking the
Hudson River The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York (state), New York in the United States. It originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley ...

Hudson River
and the
George Washington Bridge The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the New York City borough of Manhattan with the Borough (New Jersey), New Jersey borough of Fort Lee, New Jersey, Fort Lee. The bridge is ...

George Washington Bridge
. Students are guaranteed housing on campus all years, although many students choose to live in other parts of New York City.


P&S Club

There are student clubs covering a range of professional and personal interests, all of which fall under the umbrella of the P&S Club. One unusual element is the Bard Hall Players, a theatrical group entirely run by the students of the medical campus, and one of the largest and most active medical school theater groups in the country. They perform a musical and two plays each year. Founded over a century ago by
John Mott John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865 – January 31, 1955) was an evangelist and long-serving leader of the Young Men's Christian Association ( YMCA) and the World Student Christian Federation (WSCF). He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for ...
, the 1946
Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prize The Nobel Prizes ( ; sv, Nobelpriset ; no, Nobelprisen ) are five separate prizes that, according to Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel ( , ; 21 October 1833 – 10 Decemb ...
recipient, the P&S Club serves to support and provide activities and organizations for the enrichment of the lives of VP&S students. The P&S Club is well known for its humanitarian aims; most notably the 1917 purchase of a steam launch delivered to Sir William Grenfell, a physician living in
Labrador , nickname = "The Big Land" , etymology = , subdivision_type = Country , subdivision_name = Canada , subdivision_type1 = Provinces and territories of ...

Labrador
. This launch was used to deliver medical services to the
Inuit Inuit (; iu, ᐃᓄᐃᑦ 'the people', singular: Inuk, , dual: Inuuk, ) are a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples Indigenous peoples, also referred to as First people, Aboriginal people, Native people, or autochthonous people, ...
and
First Nations The First Nations (french: Premières Nations ) are groups of Canadian indigenous peoples, who are classified as distinct from the Inuit Inuit (; iu, ᐃᓄᐃᑦ 'the people', singular: Inuk, , dual: Inuuk, ) are a group of culturally s ...
fishermen living on the islands of the Labrador coast and frequently, was crewed by P&S students.


History


Colonial years

In 1767, Dr. Samuel Bard, an alumnus of then-
King's College
King's College
and the
University of Edinburgh Medical School The University of Edinburgh Medical School (also known as Edinburgh Medical School) is the medical school of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and part of the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, the head of which is Moira Whyte ...
, opened a
medical school A medical school is a tertiary education Tertiary education, also referred to as third-level, third-stage or post-secondary education, is the education Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowled ...
at
Columbia Columbia may refer to: * Columbia (personification), the historical female national personification of the United States, and a poetic name for the Americas Places North America Natural features * Columbia Plateau, a geologic and geographic regio ...

Columbia
. At the time, the medical program at King's College was the first to open in the
Province of New York The Province of New York (1664–1776) was a British proprietary colony A proprietary colony was a type of English colony mostly in North America North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all w ...
and only the second to be opened in the
American Colonies#REDIRECT American colonies
{{Redirect category shell, {{R from ambiguous term {{R unprintworthy ...
. The school was modelled on the
University of Edinburgh Medical School The University of Edinburgh Medical School (also known as Edinburgh Medical School) is the medical school of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and part of the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, the head of which is Moira Whyte ...
, which at the time was the world leader. Three years later, in 1770, King's College conferred its first
medical degree A medical degree is a professional degree A professional degree, formerly known in the US as a first professional degree, is a degree that prepares someone to work in a particular profession A Profession is a disciplined group of individuals ...
to Robert Tucker, this would prove to be the first
Doctor of Medicine Doctor of Medicine (abbreviated M.D., from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Lat ...
(M.D.) awarded in the Thirteen Colonies. Prior to King's College of Medicine offering of the M.D. degree, other American and Canadian medical schools had been offering the M.B. degree. King's College continued to educate young doctors until 1776 when the school was forced to close due to the onset of the
Revolutionary WarRevolutionary War(s) may refer to: * American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), the armed conflict between Great Britain and 13 of its North American colonies, which had declared themselves the independent United States of America * French Revolution ...
and the occupation of New York by British soldiers. King's College remained closed until 1784 when the school was reopened as Columbia College and in December of that year, the faculty of the medical school were re-instated. In 1791, Bard, now a prominent colonial physician whom
George Washington George Washington (February 22, 1732, 1799) was an American soldier, statesman, and Founding Father The following list of national founding figures is a record, by country, of people who were credited with establishing a state. Natio ...

George Washington
credited with saving his life, was named dean of the medical school.


Merger with the College of Physicians and Surgeons

In 1807, with a growing young nation in need of adequately trained physicians, the
New York State Board of RegentsThe Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York is responsible for the general supervision of all educational activities within New York State, presiding over University of the State of New York and the New York State Education Depar ...
founded, under separate charter, the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Merely four years later, in 1811, Dr. Samuel Bard, dean of Columbia University Medical School, became president of the college. The year 1814 then saw the merger of Columbia University Medical School into the College of Physicians and Surgeons, a move that was made in an attempt to reverse what then was perceived as a period of decline for the medical school. Despite this merger, the College of Physicians and Surgeons retained its independence from Columbia and it was only in 1860 that the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at that time occupying buildings across West Fifty-ninth Street from the
Roosevelt Hospital Mount Sinai West, opened in 1871 as Roosevelt Hospital, is affiliated with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System. The 514-bed facility is located in the Midtown West neighborhood of New York City ...
(its major teaching hospital at the time), after severing its ties to the New York Board of Regents and through agreement between the trustees of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and Columbia, became the official medical school of Columbia University. This new relationship between the college and Columbia was minimal at best, however, with the college retaining independence from Columbia. It was not until 1891 that the College of Physicians and Surgeons would be fully integrated and incorporated into Columbia. In 1886, the Sloane Maternity Hospital, later the Sloane Hospital for Women, was founded as part of Physicians and Surgeons.


Medical Center Formation

In 1911, Columbia University entered into a "Formal Agreement of Alliance" with Presbyterian Hospital, a hospital founded in 1868 by
James Lenox James Lenox (August 19, 1800 – February 17, 1880) was an American bibliophile Bibliophilia or bibliophilism is the love of books, and a bibliophile or Bookworm (insect), bookworm is an individual who loves and frequently reads books. Profil ...

James Lenox
a New York
philanthropist Philanthropy consists of "private initiatives, for the public good, focusing on quality of life Quality of life (QOL) is defined by the World Health Organization The World Health Organization (WHO) is a list of specialized agencies of the ...

philanthropist
. It was this alliance, initiated by philanthropist
Edward Harkness Edward Stephen Harkness (January 22, 1874 – January 29, 1940) was an American philanthropist. Given privately and through his family's Commonwealth Fund, Harkness' gifts to private hospitals, art museums, and educational institutions in the Nort ...
, that helped to pave the way for the creation of a new medical center format. In 1928, the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center opened its doors in a building largely funded by Harkness. Set on land in the
Washington HeightsWashington Heights may refer to: Places ;Japan *Washington Heights (Tokyo), a former US Army barracks and housing area during the occupation of Japan ;United States *Washington Heights, Chicago, Illinois *Washington Heights, New Jersey, Washingto ...
section of Manhattan, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center was the first place in the world to provide facilities for patient care, medical education, and research all under one roof. It was the first academic medical center and pioneered the practice of combining medical training with patient care. Included in this project with Presbyterian Hospital were the Babies Hospital, the Neurologic Institute of New York, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute; these were then joined in 1950 by the New York Orthopaedic Hospital. In 1997, the Presbyterian Hospital merged with New York Hospital (partner of
Weill Cornell Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine , officially the Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, is the biomedical research unit and medical school of Cornell University, a private university, private Ivy League university. The medical colleg ...
of
Cornell University Cornell University is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly two ...
) to form the
NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital The New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a Nonprofit organization, nonprofit Academic health science centre, academic medical center in New York City affiliated with two List of Ivy League medical schools, Ivy League medical schools: Columbia Universi ...
. This new hospital system also has incorporated many of the satellite hospitals and affiliated programs of these two institutions. While the two medical schools remain independent of one another, there has been significant cross-fertilization between the two campuses, leading to increasing numbers of shared research experiences and training programs. NYPH is now the largest private employer in New York City. All hospitals in the
NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System The NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System is a network Network, networking and networked may refer to: Science and technology * Network theory Network theory is the study of Graph (discrete mathematics), graphs as a representation of either ...
are affiliated with either the Cornell or Columbia medical schools.


Renaming

At the 2017 Crown Awards, President
Lee Bollinger Lee Carroll Bollinger (born April 30, 1946) is an American lawyer and educator who is serving as the 19th and current President of Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the ...
announced that the school would officially be renamed as the Columbia University Roy and Diana Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. This decision was made in response to a gift of $250 million from Dr. P. Roy and Diana Vagelos. $150 million of the gift, was dedicated to endow a fund to help Columbia eliminate student loans for medical students who qualify for financial aid. The remaining $100 million will be divided equally to support precision medicine programs and basic science research as well as an endowed professorship in the Department of Medicine in honor of the Vagelos family's longtime doctor and friend, Thomas P. Jacobs, MD.


Prominent faculty

Prominent faculty members include Nobel Prize laureates
Richard Axel Richard Axel (born July 2, 1946) is an American molecular biologist and university professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the C ...

Richard Axel
,
Eric Kandel Eric Richard Kandel (; born Erich Richard Kandel, November 7, 1929) is an Austrian-born American medical doctor A physician (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or ...

Eric Kandel
, and
Joachim Frank Joachim Frank (born September 12, 1940) is a German-American Biophysics, biophysicist at Columbia University and a Nobel laureate. He is regarded as the founder of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), for which he shared the Nobel ...

Joachim Frank
; cardiothoracic surgeon, author, talk show host, and commentator
Mehmet Oz Mehmet Cengiz Öz (; born June 11, 1960), known professionally as Dr. Oz, is an American television personality Celebrity is a condition of wikt:fame, fame and broad public recognition of an individual or group, or occasionally a character ...
; author
Oliver Sacks Oliver Wolf Sacks, (9 July 1933 – 30 August 2015) was a British neurologist Neurology (from el, νεῦρον (neûron), "string, nerve" and the suffix -logia, "study of") is a branch of medicine Medicine is the Art (skill), art, ...

Oliver Sacks
; 2011 Pulitzer Prize winner for nonfiction
Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee (born 21 July 1970) is an Indian-American physician, biologist, oncologist, and author. He is best known for his 2010 book, ''The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer'' that won notable literary prizes including the ...

Siddhartha Mukherjee
; and Rudolph Leibel whose co-discovery of the
hormone A hormone (from the Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is appr ...

hormone
leptin Leptin (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approxim ...

leptin
, and cloning of the
leptin Leptin (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approxim ...

leptin
and
leptin receptor Leptin receptor, also known as LEP-R or OB-R, is a type I cytokine receptor, a protein that in humans is encoded by the ''LEPR'' gene. LEP-R functions as a receptor (biochemistry), receptor for the fat cell-specific hormone leptin. LEP-R has also ...
genes, has had a major role in the area of understanding
human Humans (''Homo sapiens'') are the most abundant and widespread species In biology, a species is the basic unit of biological classification, classification and a taxonomic rank of an organism, as well as a unit of biodiversity. A speci ...

human
obesity Obesity is a medical condition A disease is a particular abnormal condition that negatively affects the structure or function (biology), function of all or part of an organism, and that is not due to any immediate external injury. ...

obesity
. Jean C. Emond, Thomas S. Zimmer Professor of Surgery, participated in the first living-donor
liver transplantation Liver transplantation or hepatic transplantation is the replacement of a diseased liver with the healthy liver The liver is an organ Organ may refer to: Biology * Organ (anatomy) An organ is a group of Tissue (biology), tissues with ...
in children in North America and established the liver transplant program at Columbia, which has become one of the largest in the United States. Joshua Sonett, Professor of Clinical Surgery, performed chest surgery on President
Bill Clinton William Jefferson Clinton ('' né'' Blythe III; born August 19, 1946) is an American politician and attorney who served as the 42nd president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and ...

Bill Clinton
in 2005. In November 2018, Expertscape recognized Columbia as #1 in the world for expertise in
Celiac Disease Coeliac disease or celiac disease is a long-term autoimmune disorder An autoimmune disease is a condition arising from an abnormal immune response to a functioning body part. There are at least 80 types of autoimmune diseases. Nearly any bo ...
and Dr. Peter Green as the world's #1 expert.


Notable alumni


Medical innovators

*
Virginia Apgar Virginia Apgar (June 7, 1909August 7, 1974) was an American physician A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth English), medical doctor, or simply doctor, is a professional wh ...

Virginia Apgar
(
Apgar score The Apgar score is a method to quickly summarize the health of newborn 222x222px, Eight-month-old sororal twin sisters An infant (from the Latin word ''infans'', meaning 'unable to speak' or 'speechless') is the more formal or specialise ...

Apgar score
) *
Oswald Avery Oswald Theodore Avery Jr. (October 21, 1877 – February 20, 1955) was a Canadian-American physician and medical researcher. The major part of his career was spent at the Rockefeller Hospital in New York City. Avery was one of the first molecul ...
(pioneer in
immunochemistry Immunochemistry is the study of the chemistry of the immune system. This involves the study of the properties, functions, interactions and production of the chemical components (antibodies/immunoglobulins, toxin, epitopes of proteins like CD4, an ...
) *
T. Romeyn Beck
T. Romeyn Beck
(pioneer in
medical jurisprudence Medical jurisprudence or legal medicine is the branch of science Science (from the Latin word ''scientia'', meaning "knowledge") is a systematic enterprise that Scientific method, builds and Taxonomy (general), organizes knowledge in the f ...
; authored first significant American book on
forensic medicine Forensic medicine is a group of medical specialties which deal with the examination and diagnosis of individuals who have been injured by or who have died because of external or unnatural causes such as poisoning, assault, suicide and other forms o ...
) * H. I. Biegeleisen (pioneer of phlebology; one of the first doctors in United States to use injection as a method of treating
varicose veins Varicose veins, also known as varicoses, are a medical condition in which superficial vein A superficial vein is a vein Veins are blood vessels The blood vessels are the components of the circulatory system The circulatory system, ...

varicose veins
; coined the term ''
sclerotherapy Sclerotherapy (the word reflects the Greek ''skleros'', meaning ''hard'') is a procedure used to treat blood vessel malformations ( vascular malformations) and also malformations of the lymphatic system. A medicine is injected into the vessels, w ...

sclerotherapy
) * T. Berry Brazelton (
pediatrician Paediatrics ( also spelled pediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine Medicine is the science Science () is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understan ...

pediatrician
, Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale) *
Leo BuergerLeo Buerger (English ; ) (September 13, 1879 in Vienna – October 6, 1943 in New York City) was an Austrian American pathologist, surgeon and urologist. Buerger's disease is named for him. Family and education In 1880s his family emigrated to ...
(urologist that characterized Buerger disease) * Charles Drew (ground-breaking work in
blood transfusions Blood transfusion is the process of transferring blood product A blood product is any therapeutic substance prepared from human blood. This includes whole blood; blood components; and plasma derivatives. Whole blood is not commonly used in t ...
, blood storage, large-scale
blood banks A blood bank is a center where blood gathered as a result of blood donation is stored and preserved for later use in blood transfusion. The term "blood bank" typically refers to a division of a hospital where the storage of blood product occurs and ...
) *
Tom Frieden Thomas R. Frieden (born December 7, 1960) is an American infectious disease An infection is the invasion of an organism's body Tissue (biology), tissues by Pathogen, disease-causing agents, their multiplication, and the reaction of host (biol ...
(Director of U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); New York City Health Commissioner) *
Oliver Wolcott Gibbs Oliver Wolcott Gibbs (February 21, 1822 – December 9, 1908) was an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United State ...
(chemist; known for performing first electrogravimetric analyses;
National Academy of Sciences The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a United States nonprofit A nonprofit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity, not-for-profit organization, or nonprofit institution, is a legal entity organized and operated for a ...
, President (also a founding member), 1895–1900) * John Franklin Gray (pioneer in field of and first practitioner of homoeopathy in United States; also recognized as important medical reformer) * Peter K. Gregersen (Crafoord Prize in Polyarthritis in 2013)The Crafoord Prize in Polyarthritis 2013
Crafoord Prize. Press Release. January 17, 2013. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
*William Stewart Halsted, William Halsted (introduced several new operations, one of "Big Four" founding professors at Johns Hopkins Hospital) *Jean Emily Henley (wrote the first widely used anesthesia textbook) *Robert Lefkowitz (U.S. National Medal of Science, Shaw Prize, 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) *Sean E. McCance (orthopedic surgeon) *Walsh McDermott (infectious diseases and public health; pioneered the use of isoniazid to treat tuberculosis) *David McDowell (psychiatrist, author, consultant) *Jean Baker Miller (psychoanalyst, feminist, social activist, wrote ''Toward a New Psychology of Women (1976)) *Dorothy Klenke Nash (first American woman neurosurgeon) *Frederick F. Russell (Brigadier general (United States), Brigadier General; U.S. Army physician who developed the first successful typhoid vaccine in 1909; Public Welfare Medal) *Benjamin Spock (pediatrician, wrote ''The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care'') *Albert Starr (2007 Lasker Award; cardiovascular surgeon; pioneer, inventor, Starr heart valve) *Paul Stelzer (cardiothoracic surgeon) *
P. Roy Vagelos Pindaros Roy Vagelos (born October 8, 1929, in Westfield, New Jersey New Jersey is a U.S. state, state in the Mid-Atlantic States, Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States, Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered ...
(president, CEO, chairman of pharmaceutical company Merck & Co., Merck) *Allen Whipple (Whipple procedure, Whipple's triad)


Nobel laureates

*Baruch Samuel Blumberg *Joshua Lederberg *Robert J. Lefkowitz (best known for his work with G protein-coupled receptors for which he won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) *Dickinson W. Richards *Harold Varmus (Director, National Institutes of Health; Director, National Cancer Institute; President, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center)


Writers

*Jacob M. Appel, Jacob Appel (2004 William Faulkner – William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition) *Robert Coles (psychiatrist), Robert Coles (Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction, MacArthur Award "genius grant", Presidential Medal of Freedom, National Humanities Medal) *Robin Cook (American novelist), Robin Cook (100 million+ copies of works in print) *Jerome Groopman *Walker Percy (National Book Award for Fiction, "''Time'' 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005") *John E. Sarno (originator of the diagnosis of psychosomatic condition, tension myositis syndrome)


Others

Other alumni include astronaut Story Musgrave, Olympic champion Jenny Thompson (twelve medals, including eight gold medals), former Afghan prime minister Abdul Zahir (politician), Abdul Zahir, mayor of the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California (2006–) Don Kurth, and philanthropists Theodore K. Lawless and Jean Shafiroff. George Fletcher Chandler served with the United States Army Medical Corps, US Army Medical Corps and practiced as a physician and surgeon throughout New York in addition to organizing and serving as the first Superintendent of the New York State Police. Charles W. Berry was New York City Comptroller. Serbs, Serb politician and accused war criminal Radovan Karadžić studied at Columbia for a year. Former National Basketball Association, NBA player Mark Pope attended P&S, but left to coach college basketball. John L. Leal's application of chlorine disinfection technology and his defense of the chemical's use, contributed significantly to the eradication of typhoid fever and other waterborne diseases in the U.S.


In fiction

*The characters Derek Shepherd, Mark Sloan (Grey's Anatomy), Mark Sloan, and Addison Montgomery from medical drama ''Grey's Anatomy'' and Sam Bennett (Private Practice), Sam Bennett and Naomi Bennett from the spinoff series ''Private Practice (TV series), Private Practice'' attended P&S together *Joel Fleischman (Rob Morrow) in ''Northern Exposure'' *Dr. The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension, Buckaroo Banzai (Peter Weller) and Dr. Sidney Zweibel (Jeff Goldblum) were P&S classmates in ''The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension'' (1984)


References

Notes


External links

* {{DEFAULTSORT:Columbia University College Of Physicians And Surgeons Columbia University NewYork–Presbyterian Healthcare System Schools of medicine in New York City Washington Heights, Manhattan Educational institutions established in 1767 1767 establishments in New York Ivy League medical schools