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Woman Of The Apocalypse
The Woman of the Apocalypse (or woman clothed with the sun, el, γυνὴ περιβεβλημένη τὸν ἥλιον, gynē peribeblēmenē ton hēlion; ') is a figure described in Revelation 12, Chapter 12 of the Book of Revelation (written c. AD 95). The woman gives birth to a male child who is threatened by a dragon, identified as the Devil and Satan, who intends to devour the child as soon as he is born. When the child is taken to heaven, the woman flees on eagle’s wings into the wilderness at "palace prepared" for 1,260 days. This leads to a "War in Heaven" in which the angels cast out the dragon. The dragon attacks the woman, but the woman escapes on her wings for "a time, times and a time and a half" i.e. 1,260 days. These two passages (1,260 days, and a time, times and a time and a half), are part of the larger a parallelism, and hence describe the same incident. The dragon then attacks her again with a flood of water from his mouth, which is subsequently swall ...
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Woman Apocalypse Hungary
A woman is an adult female human. Prior to adulthood, a female human is referred to as a girl (a female child or Adolescence, adolescent). The plural ''women'' is sometimes used in certain phrases such as "women's rights" to denote female humans regardless of age. Typically, women have two X chromosomes and are capable of pregnancy and giving childbirth, birth from puberty until menopause. Female anatomy is distinguished from male anatomy by the female reproductive system, which includes the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, and vulva. The adult female pelvis is wider, the hips broader, and the breasts larger than that of adult males. Women have significantly less facial and other body hair, have a higher body fat composition, and are on average shorter and less muscular than men. Throughout History of the world, human history, traditional gender roles have often defined and limited women's activities and opportunities; many religious doctrines stipulate certain rules ...
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Protestant
Protestantism is a form of that originated with the 16th-century , a movement against what its followers perceived to be in the . Protestants originating in the Reformation reject the Roman Catholic doctrine of , but disagree among themselves regarding the number of s, the of in the , and matters of and . They emphasize the ; (') rather than by faith with ; the teaching that comes by or "unmerited favor" only, not as something merited ('); and either affirm the as being the sole highest authority (' "scripture alone") or primary authority (' "scripture first") for Christian doctrine, rather than being on parity with . The of Lutheran and Reformed Christianity summarise basic theological differences in opposition to the Catholic Church. Protestantism began in ). in 1517, when published his ' as a reaction against abuses in the sale of s by the Catholic Church, which purported to offer the remission of the of sins to their purchasers. The term, however, derives from th ...
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Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII ( it, Pio XII), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (; 2 March 18769 October 1958), was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian ... and sovereign of the Vatican City State Vatican City (), officially the Vatican City State ( it, Stato della Città del Vaticano; la, Status Civitatis Vaticanae),—' * german: Vatikanstadt, cf. '—' (in Austria: ') * pl, Miasto Watykańskie, cf. '—' * pt, Cidade do Vatican ... from 2 March 1939 until his death in 1958. Before his election to the papacy, he served as secretary of the Department of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, papal nuncio to Germany, and Cardinal Secretary of State The Secretary of State of His Holiness ( it, Segretario di Stato di Sua Santità), ...
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Pope Pius X
Pope Pius X ( it, Pio X; born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto; 2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914) was head of the Catholic Church as Pope from August 1903 to his death in 1914. Pius X is known for vigorously opposing Modernism in the Catholic Church, modernist interpretations of Catholic doctrine, promoting liturgical reforms and scholastic philosophy and theology. He initiated the preparation of the 1917 Code of Canon Law, the first comprehensive and systemic work of its kind. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church and is the namesake of the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Pius X. Pius X was devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary under the Marian title, title of Our Lady of Confidence; while his papal encyclical ''Ad diem illum'' took on a sense of renewal that was reflected in the motto of his pontificate. He advanced the Liturgical Movement by formulating the principle of ''participatio actuosa'' (active participation) of the faithful in his motu proprio, ''Tra le sollecitudi ...
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Oikoumenios
Oecumenius ( el, Οἰκουμένιος, Ἐπίσκοπος Τρίκκης), once believed to be a Bishop of Trikka (now Trikala) in Thessaly writing about 990 (according to Cave, ''Scriptorum eccles. hist. liter.'' (Basel, 1745), p. 112), was reputed to be the author of several commentaries on books of the New Testament. However, more recently scholars have redated Oecumenius' ''Commentary on the Apocalypse'' to the early seventh century, or the late sixth century, and have located Oecumenius as writing in Asia Minor.John N. Suggit, trans. ''Oecumenius: Commentary on the Apocalypse.'' Preface. Fathers of the Church 112 (Catholic University, Washington DC) 2006. Writings Manuscripts of the eleventh century contain commentaries on the Acts of the Apostles and on the Catholic Epistles, Catholic and Pauline epistles, attributed since the sixteenth century to Oecumenius. Those on the Acts and Catholic Epistles are identical with the commentaries of Theophylact of Bulgaria (elev ...
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Andreas Of Caesarea
file:Святитель Андрей Кесарийский.jpg, thumb Andreas of Caesarea ( el, Ἀνδρέας Καισαρείας; AD 563–637) was a Greek people, Greek theological writer and bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia. Karl Krumbacher assigned him to the first half of the sixth century. He is variously placed by other scholars, from the fifth to the ninth century. However, today it is unquestionable that his life spanned the late sixth/early seventh centuries. Works His principal work is a commentary on the Book of Revelation (''Patrologia Graeca'' vol. 106, cols. 215–458 and 1387–94) and is the oldest Greek patristic commentary on that book of the Bible. The very first Greek commentary on Revelation barely predates Andrew's work and is attributed to Œcumenius, Oikoumenios. “Oikoumenios” is not a recognized Father of the Church. Therefore, Andrew of Caesarea's work is correctly identified as the earliest Greek Patristic commentary on the Apocalypse. Most subs ...
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Cassiodorus
Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator (c. 485 – c. 585), commonly known as Cassiodorus (), was a Roman Roman or Romans most often refers to: *, the capital city of Italy *, Roman civilization from 8th century BC to 5th century AD *, the people of ancient Rome *', shortened to ''Romans'', a letter in the New Testament of the Christian Bible Roman ... statesman, renowned scholar of antiquity, and writer serving in the administration of Theodoric the Great Theodoric (or Theoderic) the Great (454 – 30 August 526), also called Theodoric the Amal ( la, Flāvius Theoderīcus; el, Θευδέριχος, Theuderichos), was king of the Ostrogoths (471–526), and ruler of the independent Ostrogothic Kin ..., king of the Ostrogoths The Ostrogoths ( la, Ostrogothi, Austrogothi) were a Roman-era Germanic people Germanic may refer to: * Germanic peoples The historical Germanic peoples (from lat, Germani) are a category of ancient northern European tribes, first mention .... ' ...
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Quodvultdeus
Quodvultdeus (Latin for "what God wills", died 450 AD) was a fifth-century church father and bishop of Carthage (episcopal see), Carthage who was exiled to Naples. He was known to have been living in Carthage around 407 and became a deacon in 421 AD. He corresponded with Augustine of Hippo, who served as Quodvultdeus' spiritual teacher.Patron Saints Index: Saint Quodvultdeus
Augustine also dedicated some of his writings to Quodvultdeus. Quodvultdeus was exiled when Carthage was captured by the Vandals led by King Genseric, who followed Arianism. Tradition states that he and other churchmen (such as Gaudiosus of Naples) were loaded onto leaky ships that landed at Naples around 439 AD and Quodvultdeus established himself in ...
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History Of Joseph The Carpenter
The ''History of Joseph the Carpenter'' (''Historia Josephi Fabri Lignari'') is a compilation of traditions concerning Mary (mother of Jesus) According to the gospels of Gospel of Matthew, Matthew and Gospel of Luke, Luke in the New Testament, Mary; arc, ܡܪܝܡ, translit=Mariam; ar, مريم, translit=Maryam; el, Μαρία, translit=María; la, Maria; cop, Ⲙⲁⲣⲓ ..., Joseph Joseph is a common masculine given name, derived from the Hebrew Yosef (יוֹסֵף). The form "Joseph" is used mostly in English, French and partially German-speaking (alongside "Josef") countries. This spelling is also found as a variant in th ..., and the "holy family The Holy Family consists of the Child Jesus, the Blessed Virgin Mary, Virgin Mary, and Saint Joseph. The subject became popular in art from the 1490s on, but veneration of the Holy Family was formally begun in the 17th century by Saint Françoi ...," probably composed in Byzantine Egypt in Greek in the late si ...
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Ticonius
Ticonius, also spelled Tyconius or Tychonius (active 370–390 AD) was one of the most important theologians of 4th-century North African Latin Christianity , native_name_lang = la , image = San Giovanni in Laterano - Rome.jpg , imagewidth = 250px , alt = Façade of the Archbasilica of St. John in Lateran , caption = Archbasilica of Saint John .... He was a Donatist Donatism was a Christian sect A sect is a subgroup of a religious Religion is a - of designated and practices, , s, s, , , , , or , that relates humanity to , , and elements; however, there is no scholarly consensus over what precis ... writer whose conception of the City of God influenced St. Augustine of Hippo Augustine of Hippo (; la, Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430), also known as Saint Augustine, was a theologian and philosopher of Berber Berber or Berbers may refer to: Culture * Berbers Berb ...
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Epiphanius Of Salamis
Epiphanius of Salamis ( grc-gre, Ἐπιφάνιος; c. 310–320 – 403) was the bishop of Salamis, Cyprus Salamis ( grc, Σαλαμίς, el, Σαλαμίνα, tr, Salamis) is an ancient Greek city-state A city-state is an independent sovereign Sovereign is a title which can be applied to the highest leader in various categories. The word is b ... at the end of the 4th century The 4th century (per the Julian calendar The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (; 12 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman people, Roman general and statesman who played a critical role in Crisis of the .... He is considered a saint In religious belief, a saint is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of Q-D-Š, holiness, likeness, or closeness to God. However, the use of the term ''saint'' depends on the context and Christian denomination, denominatio ... and a Church Father The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, ...
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Virgen De Guadalupe2
Virgen is a municipality in the district of Lienz (district), Lienz in the Austrian state of state of Tyrol, Tyrol. It includes part of the Virgen valley in the Venediger Group mountain range, and extensive parts of the municipality are in High Tauern, High Tauern National Park. The history of the area goes back to 500 BC, when copper mining played an important role. After the end of the Roman Empire, Roman period Slavs settled in the Virgen valley, who were gradually assimilated by Baiuvarii settlers beginning in the 8th century. The simultaneous Christianisation of the Germanic peoples, Christianization of the area led to the creation of one of the first Parish, parishes in the region. During the middle ages Virgen was a part of Carinthia and the County of Gorizia, and by 1500 it was annexed by Tyrol. With a population of 2,200 (as of January 1, 2020), Virgen is the fifth largest community in east Tyrol in terms of population. Agriculture and tourism both play important economic r ...
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