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Vossische Zeitung
The Vossische Zeitung (Voss's Newspaper) was a nationally known Berlin newspaper that represented the interests of the liberal middle class. It was also generally regarded as Germany's national newspaper of record. In the Berlin press it held a special role due to the fact that by way of its direct predecessors it was the oldest newspaper in the city. The name went back to Christian Friedrich Voss, who was its owner from 1751 to 1795, but ''Vossische Zeitung'' became its official name only after 1911. It ceased publication in 1934 under pressure from the Nazi Germany, Nazi state. Beginnings in Berlin In the early 17th century Christoff Frischmann collected and passed on to interested parties the news he received as postmaster of the Electorate of Brandenburg. Over time he systematized his news gathering, and he was ultimately given a mandate to maintain contacts throughout the "Holy Roman Empire, Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" and to collect news from all important loca ...
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Berlin
Berlin (; ) is the Capital city, capital and List of cities in Germany by population, largest city of Germany by both area and population. Its 3,769,495 inhabitants, as of 31 December 2019 makes it the List of cities in the European Union by population within city limits, most-populous city of the European Union, according to population within city limits. One of Germany's States of Germany, 16 constituent states, Berlin is surrounded by the state of Brandenburg, and contiguous with Potsdam, Brandenburg's capital. Berlin's urban area has a population of around 4.5 million and is the second most populous urban area in Germany after the Ruhr. The Berlin/Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, Berlin-Brandenburg capital region has about six million inhabitants and is Metropolitan regions in Germany, Germany's third-largest metropolitan region after the Rhine-Ruhr and Rhine-Main regions. Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the R ...
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major World war, global conflicts pitting the First French Empire, French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon, Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of Coalition forces of the Napoleonic Wars, European powers formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its French Revolutionary Wars, resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the War of the Third Coalition, Third Coalition (1805), the War of the Fourth Coalition, Fourth (1806–07), the War of the Fifth Coalition, Fifth (1809), the War of the Sixth Coalition, Sixth (1813–14), and the Hundred Days, Seventh (1815). The war was the biggest and bloodiest war in history until the First World War, and also witnessed the largest and bloodiest land and ...
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Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov
Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov (russian: Влади́мир Дми́триевич Набо́ков; 21 July 1870 – 28 March 1922) was a Russian criminology, criminologist, journalist, and progressive statesman during the last years of the Russian Empire. He was the father of Russian-American author Vladimir Nabokov. Early life Nabokov was born in Tsarskoe Selo, into a wealthy and aristocratic family. His father Dmitry Nabokov (1827–1904) was a List of Justice Ministers of Imperial Russia, Justice Minister in the reign of Alexander II of Russia, Alexander II from 1878 to 1885, and his mother Maria von Korff (1842–1926) was a Baroness from a prominent Baltic German family in Courland. He studied criminal law at the University of St. Petersburg and taught criminology at the Imperial School of Jurisprudence. Nabokov married Elena Ivanovna Rukavishnikova in 1897 with whom he had five children. Their eldest son was the writer and lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov, Vladi ...
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Weimar Republic
The Weimar Republic (german: Weimarer Republik ) was the German state from 1918 to 1933 when it functioned as a federal constitutional republic. The state was officially named the German Reich (german: Deutsches Reich, link=no, label=none), and was also referred to as the German Republic (german: Deutsche Republik, link=no, label=none). The first term refers to the city of Weimar Weimar (; la, Vimaria or Vinaria) is a city in the federal state of Thuringia, Germany. It is located in Central Germany (cultural area), Central Germany between Erfurt in the west and Jena in the east, approximately southwest of Leipzig, nor ..., where the republic's constituent assembly A constituent assembly (also known as a constitutional convention, constitutional congress, or constitutional assembly) is a body assembled for the purpose of drafting or revising a constitution A constitution is an aggregate of fundamental ... first took place. In English the country was usually simp ...
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World War I
World War I, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war A world war is "a war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newsp ... that began on 28 July 1914 and ended on 11 November 1918. It involved much of Europe Europe is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasses. Generally identified by convention (norm), convention rather than any strict criteria, up to seven geographical regions are commonly regarded as continents. Ordered ..., as well as Russia Russia ( rus, link=no, Россия, Rossiya, ), or the Russian Federation, is a country spanning Eastern Europe Eastern Europe is the eastern region of . There is no consistent definition of the precise area it covers, partly because th .. ...
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Monarchy Of Germany
The Monarchy of Germany (the German Monarchy) was the system of government in which a hereditary monarch was the sovereign of the German Empire The German Empire or the Imperial State of Germany,, officially '.Herbert Tuttle Herbert Tuttle (1846–1894) was an American historian. Biography Herbert Tuttle was born in Bennington, Vermont Bennington is a New England town, town ... from 1871 to 1918. History The Monarch of Germany was created with the proclamation of the President of the North German Confederation The North German Confederation (german: Norddeutscher Bund) was the Germans, German federal state which existed from July 1867 to December 1870. The Confederation came into existence after the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 over the lordship of tw ... and the King of Prussia The monarchs of Prussia were members of the House of Hohenzollern The House of Hohenzollern (, also , , german: Haus Hohenzollern, ro, Casa de Hohenzollern) is a German royal ...
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Rudolf Mosse
Rudolf Mosse (8 May 1843 – 8 September 1920) was a German German(s) may refer to: * Germany (of or related to) **Germania (historical use) * Germans, citizens of Germany, people of German ancestry, or native speakers of the German language ** For citizens of Germany, see also German nationality law **Ger ... publisher Publishing is the activity of making information, literature, music, software and other content available to the public for sale or for free. Traditionally, the term refers to the creation and distribution of printed works, such as book A ... and philanthropist Philanthropy consists of "private initiatives, for the Public good (economics), public good, focusing on quality of life". Philanthropy contrasts with business initiatives, which are private initiatives for private good, focusing on material gain .... Biography Mosse was born in Grätz, Grand Duchy of Posen The Grand Duchy of Posen (german: Großherzogtum Posen; pl, Wielkie Księstw ...
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August Scherl
August Scherl (24 July 1849 – 18 April 1921) was a German German(s) may refer to: Common uses * of or related to Germany * Germans, Germanic ethnic group, citizens of Germany or people of German ancestry * For citizens of Germany, see also German nationality law * German language The German la ... newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a periodical) is a category of serial Serial may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media The presentation of works in sequential segments ... magnate A magnate, from the late Latin Late Latin ( la, Latinitas serior) is the scholarly name for the written Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally .... Life August Hugo Friedrich Scherl founded a newspaper and publishing concern on 1 October 1883, which from 1900 carried the name August Scherl Verl ...
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Ullstein Verlag
The ''Ullstein Verlag'' was founded by Leopold Ullstein in 1877 at Berlin and is one of the largest publishing companies of Germany. It published newspapers like ''B.Z. (newspaper), B.Z.'' and ''Berliner Morgenpost'' and books through its subsidiaries ''Ullstein Buchverlage'' and ''Propyläen''. The newspaper publishing branch was taken over by Axel Springer AG in 1956. History On 14 July 1877 Leopold Ullstein purchased the ''Neue Berliner Tageblatt'' newspaper, a subsidiary of the liberal ''Berliner Tageblatt'' published by Rudolf Mosse, and on 1 January 1878 converted it into the ''Berliner Zeitung'' (''B.Z.''). In 1894 he also acquired the ''Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung'' weekly, which as technology advanced and permitted heavy use of photographs, became the most successful picture paper in Germany. The ''B.Z. am Mittag'', relaunched in 1904, became Germany's first Tabloid journalism, tabloid newspaper. On the other hand, Ullstein's sons on 1 January 1914 acquired the reputable ...
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Frederick William IV Of Prussia
Frederick William IV (german: Friedrich Wilhelm IV.; 15 October 17952 January 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 7 June 1840 to his death on 2 January 1861. Also referred to as the "romanticist on the throne", he is best remembered for the many buildings he had constructed in Berlin and Potsdam as well as for the completion of the Gothic Cologne Cathedral. In politics, he was a conservative, who initially pursued a moderate policy of easing press censorship and reconciling with the Catholic population of the kingdom. During the German revolutions of 1848–1849, he at first accommodated the revolutionaries but rejected the title of German Emperor, Emperor of the Germans offered by the Frankfurt Parliament in 1849, believing that Parliament did not have the right to make such an offer. He used military force to crush the revolutionaries throughout the German Confederation. From 1849 onward he converted Prussia ...
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German Revolutions Of 1848–1849
The German revolutions of 1848–1849 (), the opening phase of which was also called the March Revolution (), were initially part of the Revolutions of 1848 that broke out in many European countries. They were a series of loosely coordinated protests and rebellions in the states of the German Confederation, including the Austrian Empire. The revolutions, which stressed pan-Germanism, demonstrated popular discontent with the traditional, largely autocratic political structure of the thirty-nine sovereign state, independent states of the Confederation that inherited the German territory of the former Holy Roman Empire after its dismantlement as a result of the Napoleonic Wars. This process began in the mid 1840s. The middle-class elements were committed to Liberalism, liberal principles, while the working class sought radical improvements to their working and living conditions. As the middle class and working class components of the Revolution split, the conservative aristocracy de ...
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