HOME



Lord High Treasurer Of Ireland
The Lord High Treasurer of Ireland was the head of the Exchequer of Ireland, chief financial officer of the Kingdom of Ireland. The designation ''High'' was added in 1695. After the Acts of Union 1800 created the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the Consolidated Fund Act 1816 merged the Irish Inferior Exchequer into the HM Treasury, British Treasury with effect from 1817. The act also mandated that the post of Lord High Treasurer of Ireland could only be held together with the post of Tresurer of the Exchequer, with the person holding both then being Lord High Treasurer of the United Kingdom. If no person is appointed to the combined positions, then Lord High Treasurer of Ireland is placed in commission, and represented by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, as has been the case continuously since 1816. The Superior Irish Exchequer, or Court of Exchequer (Ireland), Court of Exchequer, remained, led by the Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer. Lord Treasurers of Ir ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Exchequer Of Ireland
The Exchequer of Ireland was a body in the Kingdom of Ireland tasked with collecting The Crown, royal revenue. Modelled on the Exchequer, English Exchequer, it was created in 1210 after King John of England applied English law and legal structure to his Lordship of Ireland. The Exchequer was divided into two parts; the Court of Exchequer (Ireland), Superior Exchequer, which acted as a court of equity and revenue in a way similar to the English Exchequer of Pleas, and the Inferior Exchequer, which directly collected revenue from those who owed The Crown money, principally rents for Crown lands. The Exchequer primarily worked in a way similar to the English legal system, holding a similar jurisdiction (down to the use of the Writ of Quominus to take over cases from the Court of Chancery (Ireland), Irish Court of Chancery). Following the Act of Union 1800, which incorporated Ireland into the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, United Kingdom, the Exchequer was merged with th ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Bishop Of Waterford
A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Moravian Church, Moravian, Anglican, Old Catholic and Independent Catholic churches, as well as the Assyrian Church of the East, bishops claim apostolic succession, a direct historical Lineage (genetic), lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. Within these churches, bishops are seen as those who possess the full priesthood and can ordain clergy, including other bishops. Some Protestant churches, including the Lutheran, Anglican and Methodist churches, have bishops serving similar functions as well, though not always understood to be within apostolic succession in the same way. A person ordained as a deacon, priest, and then bishop is understood to hold the fullness of the (ministerial) priesthood, given responsibility by Christ to govern, ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

John Colton (archbishop)
John Colton ( 1320 – 1404) was a leading English-born academic, statesman and cleric of the fourteenth century. He was the first Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He spent much of his career in Ireland, where he held the offices of Treasurer of Ireland, Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Archbishop of Armagh. He is chiefly remembered today for his book ''The Visitation of Derry'' (1397), which he either wrote or commissioned. Early career Little is known of his parents, or of his early years. He was born at Terrington St. Clement in Norfolk.O'Flanagan J. Roderick ''The Lives of the Lord Chancellors of Ireland'' London 1870 He was in the service of William Bateman (bishop), William Bateman, who was Bishop of Norwich 1344-1355. He took a degree in divinity at the University of Cambridge in 1348 and the following year became the first Master of the new Gonville and Caius College, Gonville Hall, Cambridge, now Gonville and Caius College. The founder of the c ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Robert De Emeldon
Robert de Emeldon (died 1355) was an English-born Crown official and judge who spent much of his career in Ireland. He held several important public offices, including Lord High Treasurer of Ireland and Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer .Ball, F. Elrington The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921' John Murray London 1926 Vol.1 p.80 He was a turbulent and violent man, who was guilty of at least at least one (and probably more) homicides, was later imprisoned for a number of serious crimes including rape and manslaughter, and had a bad reputation for corruption: but he was a royal favourite of King Edward III of England, King Edward III and was thus able to survive temporary disgrace.Gilbert, Sir John ''History of the Viceroys of Ireland'' Dublin J. Duffy and Co. 1865 p.205 Early career He took his name from his birthplace, Embleton, Northumberland. He also had links with Newcastle-upon-Tyne, as he was a cousin of Richard de Emeldon, who was five times Mayor of Newcastle betw ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin
Saint Patrick's Cathedral ( ir, Ard-Eaglais Naomh Pádraig) in Dublin, Ireland Dublin (; , or ) is the capital and largest city of Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster-Scots: ) is an island upright=1.15, Great_Britain.html"_;"title="Ireland_(left)_and_Great_Britain">Ireland_(left)_and_Great_Britain_( ..., founded in 1191, is the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland The Church of Ireland ( ga, Eaglais na hÉireann, ; sco, label=Ulster-ScotsUlster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, may refer to: * Ulster Scots people The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots The Ulster Scots (Ulster Scots dialects, Ul .... Christ Church CathedralChrist Church Cathedral is the name of many cathedrals around the world, and may refer to: Australia * Christ Church Cathedral, Grafton, an Anglican cathedral in the Clarence Valley Council, New South Wales * Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle, an ..., also a Church of Ireland cathedral in Dublin, is designat ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



John De Burnham
John de Burnham (died 1363) was an English people, English-born judge and Crown official who spent much of his career in Ireland. He held office as Lord High Treasurer of Ireland and Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer. He spent many years trying to clear himself of charges of corruption, which seem to have been the invention of malicious colleagues. Early life He was the son of William Burnham of Norfolk, and was probably born in one of the group of adjacent villages which are called the Burnhams. His first benefice was a living in Lincolnshire. He became parish priest of Felmersham, Bedfordshire in 1333 and was named as a tax assessor for the same county in 1340, and also in Buckinghamshire. He was a member of the Royal Household from the 1320s onwards, and gained great experience in the field of finance, especially of army accounts. Church of St Mary, Felmersham, Bedfordshire: Burnham was the parish priest here in the 1330s. Lord Treasurer of Ireland In ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Hugh De Burgh
Hugh de Burgh (; ; died 1352) was a Crown official and judge in fourteenth-century Ireland, who held the offices of Lord High Treasurer of Ireland and Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer.Ball, F. Elrington ''The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921'' John Murray London 1926 Vol.i pp.75-8 He was praised for his good service to the English Crown, but was also accused of maladministration. Although he is said to have been born in England, he was a member of the leading Anglo-Irish House of Burke, de Burgh dynasty; he was a cousin of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, and later acted as attorney at law, attorney for the Earl's daughter and heiress Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster, Elizabeth, Duchess of Clarence. Her mother, Maud of Lancaster, who was second cousin to King Edward III, used her considerable influence at Court on Hugh's behalf. Despite the later complaints about his misconduct, he was a professional lawyer, and as such he was better qualified fo ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Robert Le Poer
Robert le Poer (died 1344) was an Irish people, Irish judge and Crown official who held the offices of Lord High Treasurer of Ireland and Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer. Family Francis Elrington Ball, in his definitive study of the pre-1921 Irish judiciary, says nothing of Robert's ancestry. Other sources state that he was a younger son of Arnold le Poer, Seneschal of Kilkenny (died 1331). Arnold was one of the commanders of the army of Edward II of England, Edward II which defeated the invasion of Ireland by Edward Bruce, the younger brother of Robert the Bruce. He became a figure of considerable power in his native county, but his career was destroyed by the Kilkenny Witchcraft Trials. Arnold's support for the alleged leader of the local coven of witches, his relative Alice Kyteler, gained him the enmity of Richard de Ledrede, Bishop of Ossory, who was the prime mover behind the Trials. Arnold made what was in hindsight the serious mistake of having the Bishop arr ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Robert FitzEustace
Sir Robert FitzEustace (c.1420–1486) was an Irish landowner and politician of the fifteenth century. He was born at Coghlanstown, County Kildare, son of Sir Richard FitzEustace, who served briefly as Lord Chancellor of Ireland, and Katherine Preston, widow of William Lawless. Rowland FitzEustace, 1st Baron Portlester was his cousin; Rowland was one of the dominant Irish statesmen of his time, and Robert was a loyal supporter of Portlester and his son-in-law, Gerald FitzGerald, 8th Earl of Kildare, Gerald FitzGerald, the "Great Earl" of Kildare. The office of Constable of the Castle of Ballymore Eustace was in effect hereditary in the FitzEustace family; Robert was appointed Constable on his father's death in 1445, but was dismissed from office for a time, due to his refusal to live in the castle. LIke his father he was High Sheriff of Kildare on several occasions, and he was one of the original members of the Brotherhood of Saint George, a short-lived military guild ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Adam De Harvington
Adam de Harvington, often called Adam de Herwynton (c.1270-c.1345) was a fourteenth-century Crown official and judge who had a successful career in both England and Ireland. He held office as Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer and as English Chancellor of the Exchequer, and acquired considerable wealth as a result. Family He derived his name from his birthplace, Harvington, Worcestershire; he was the son of William de Harvington or de Herwynton. His close association with Pershore Abbey suggests that William de Harvington, Abbot of Pershore 1307-40, was his cousin. De Herwynton seems to have been the common contemporary spelling of the name. Career His path to high office lay through the patronage of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (died 1315). It was probably Warwick who obtained for him the position of Deputy Chamberlain of the Exchequer in 1298 and persuaded King Edward I of England, Edward I to grant him the manor of Talton, Worcestershire, in 1303. He was g ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

John Hotham (bishop)
John Hotham (died 1337) was a medieval Chancellor of the Exchequer, Lord High Treasurer, Lord Chancellor and Bishop of Ely. He was also effective Governor of Ireland for a time. Hotham was the son of Alan and Matilda Hotham of Hotham, East Riding of Yorkshire, Hotham and nephew of William Houghton (bishop), William Hotham, Archbishop of Dublin (Roman Catholic), Archbishop of Dublin. His early career was spent in Ireland, where he became Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland until 1310. He was then appointed, on 13 December 1312, Chancellor of the Exchequer in England, a post he held until June 1316. Due to his knowledge of Irish affairs he spent a good part of the Bruce Campaign in Ireland in that country, overseeing the Irish defence and exercising temporary powers of government. His firm action is generally credited with helping to bring about the failure of the Scots invasion. Hotham was elected to Ely about 20 June 1316 and consecrated on 3 October 1316.Fryde, et al. ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Walter De Islip
Walter de Islip (died after 1336) was an English-born cleric, statesman and judge in fourteenth-century Ireland. He was the first Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer; he also held the office of Treasurer of Ireland, Chief Escheator, Custos Rotulorum of Kilkenny. He also held numerous clerical benefices. His career was damaged by accusations of corruption and maladministration. He played an important role in the celebrated Kilkenny Witchcraft Trials of 1324. Personal life Walter was born at Islip, Oxfordshire. He was a cousin of Simon Islip, Archbishop of Canterbury, and no doubt his career benefited as a result, though he was some years older than Simon. His most influential patron in his early years was Richard de Ferings, Archbishop of Dublin (Roman Catholic), Archbishop of Dublin 1229-1306; he probably arrived in Ireland in the Archbishop's entourage in 1299. Throughout his career Walter moved back and forth between Ireland and England. In Ireland he initially lived at th ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]