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Heavitree Gap
The Heavitree Gap, or ''Ntaripe'' in the Arrernte language, is a water gap in the Northern Territory of Australia in the MacDonnell Ranges. It is the southern entrance to the city of Alice Springs and in addition to the Todd River it carries the main road and rail access to the south. The Gap is an important sacred site for the Arrernte people and its use as a thoroughfare was avoided by women prior to the construction of the road and later Central Australia Railway. The Gap was named by William Mills (surveyor), William Mills, the Overland Telegraph line surveyor who discovered the location for Alice Springs. It was named after his former school in Heavitree, Devon. On the southwest side of The Gap is the historic Heavitree Gap Police Station. The Gap has been painted by numerous artists including Albert Namatjira, Oscar Namatjira, Basel Rangea, and John Borrack. References External links1923 photograph of Heavitree Gap
Alice Springs Canyons and gorges in the Northern ...
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Stuart Highway
Stuart Highway is one of Australia's major highways. It runs from Darwin, Northern Territory, Darwin, in the Northern Territory, via Tennant Creek and Alice Springs, to Port Augusta in South Australia; a distance of . Its northern and southern extremities are segments of Australia's Highway 1 (Australia), Highway 1. The principal north–south route through the central interior of mainland Australia, the highway is often referred to simply as "The Track". The highway is named after Scotland, Scottish explorer John McDouall Stuart, who was the first European to cross Australia from south to north. The highway approximates the route Stuart took. Route description Overview Stuart Highway runs from Darwin, Northern Territory, in the north, via Tennant Creek and Alice Springs, to Port Augusta, South Australia, in the south – a distance of . The Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia, Royal Flying Doctor Service uses the highway as an emergency landing strip and sections of th ...
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William Mills (surveyor)
William Whitfield Mills (19 November 1844 – 18 August 1916), usually referred to as "W. Whitfield Mills" or "W. W. Mills", was an English surveyor of the Australian Overland Telegraph Line who is best known for naming a waterhole in Central Australia Alice Spring, from which the town of Alice Springs now takes its name. He also named Heavitree Gap as a tribute to his old school in Devon, England. Early life Mills was born on 19 November 1844 at Plymouth in England. He went to school at Heavitree School in Devon. Mills immigrated to Australia on board the ''Atlanta'' from England, arriving in South Australia on 8 April 1866 at the age of 21. Goyder's Expedition Mills was a surveyor on George Goyder's mission to survey a northern capital Palmerston, later renamed Darwin, Northern Territory, Darwin. He arrived on the ''Moonta'' on 5 February 1869 leaving just short of a year later, the team having surveyed more than 2700 square kilometres of land. Surveying the Overland Telegrap ...
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Canyons And Gorges In The Northern Territory
A canyon (; archaic British English spelling: ''cañon'') or gorge is a deep cleft between escarpments or cliffs resulting from weathering and the erosion, erosive activity of a river over Geologic time scale, geologic time scales. Rivers have a natural tendency to cut through underlying surfaces, eventually wearing away rock layers as sediments are removed downstream. A river bed will gradually reach a baseline elevation, which is the same elevation as the body of water into which the river drains. The processes of weathering and erosion will form canyons when the river's River source, headwaters and estuary are at significantly different elevations, particularly through regions where softer rock layers are intermingled with harder layers more resistant to weathering. A canyon may also refer to a rift between two mountain peaks, such as those in ranges including the Rocky Mountains, the Alps, the Himalayas or the Andes. Usually, a river or stream carves out such splits between mo ...
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John Borrack
John is a common English name and surname: * John (given name) * John (surname), including a list of people who have the name John John may also refer to: New Testament Works *Johannine literature ** Gospel of John, a title often shortened to John ** Johannine epistles ***First Epistle of John, often shortened to 1 John ***Second Epistle of John, often shortened to 2 John ***Third Epistle of John, often shortened to 3 John **Book of Revelation, the Revelation of Saint John the Divine People *John the Baptist (died c. 30  AD), regarded as a prophet and the forerunner of Jesus Christ *Authorship of the Johannine works of the New Testament, sometimes identified as: **John the Apostle (lived c. 30  AD), one of the twelve apostles of Jesus **John the Evangelist, assigned author of the Fourth Gospel, once identified with the Apostle **John of Patmos, also known as John the Divine or John the Revelator, the author of the Book of Revelation, once identified with the Apostl ...
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Basel Rangea
Basel ( , ) or Basle ( ; french: link=no, Bâle ; it, Basilea ; rm, Basilea ) is a city in northwestern Switzerland on the river High Rhine, Rhine. Basel is Switzerland's List of cities in Switzerland, third-most-populous city (after Zürich and Geneva) with about 180,000 inhabitants. The official language of Basel is (the Swiss variety of Standard) Swiss Standard German, German, but the main spoken language is the local Basel German dialect. Basel is commonly considered to be the cultural capital of Switzerland. Basel is famous for its many Museums in Basel, museums, ranging from the Kunstmuseum Basel, Kunstmuseum, the first collection of art accessible to the public in the world (1661) and the largest museum of art in Switzerland, to the Fondation Beyeler (located in Riehen) and the Museum of Contemporary Art (Basel), the first public museum of contemporary art in Europe. Forty museums are spread throughout the city-canton, making Basel one of the largest cultural centres in re ...
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Oscar Namatjira
Oscar, OSCAR, or The Oscar may refer to: People * Oscar (given name), an Irish- and English-language name also used in other languages; the article includes the names Oskar, Oskari, Oszkár, Óscar, and other forms. * Oscar (Irish mythology), legendary figure, son of Oisín and grandson of Finn mac Cumhall Places * Oscar, Kentucky, an unincorporated community * Oscar, Louisiana, an unincorporated community * Oscar, Missouri, an unincorporated community * Oscar, Oklahoma, an unincorporated community * Oscar, Pennsylvania * Oscar, West Virginia, an unincorporated community * Lake Oscar (other) * Oscar Township, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, a civil township Animals * Oscar (bionic cat), a cat that had implants after losing both hind paws * Oscar (bull), #16, (d. 1983) a ProRodeo Hall of Fame bucking bull * Oscar (fish), ''Astronotus ocellatus'' * Oscar (therapy cat), cat purported to predict the deaths of hospice patients * Oscar, a nickname for Beast of Busco, a ...
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Albert Namatjira
Albert Namatjira (born Elea Namatjira; 28 July 1902 – 8 August 1959) was an Australian Aboriginal Art, Aboriginal artist from the MacDonnell Ranges in Central Australia. As a pioneer of contemporary Indigenous Australian art, he was the most famous Indigenous Australian of his generation. A member of the Western Arrernte people, Namatjira was born and raised at the Hermannsburg, Northern Territory, Hermannsburg Lutheran Mission outside Alice Springs. He showed interest in art from an early age but it was not until 1934 (aged 32) and under the guidance of Rex Battarbee that he began to paint seriously. Namatjira's richly detailed, Western art-influenced watercolours of the outback departed significantly from the abstract designs and symbols of traditional Indigenous Australian art, Aboriginal art, and inspired the Hermannsburg School of painting. He became a household name in Australia and reproductions of his works hung in many homes throughout the nation. As the first promine ...
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Heavitree Gap Police Station
Heavitree Gap Police Station is a historic building within the Heavitree Gap Police Station Historical Reserve. It is located on the southwestern side of Heavitree Gap in Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. History The area was declared as a conservation reserve under Section 12 of the Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission Act of 30 June 1978 based on its historic values. The reserve is significant because of its connection to early policing in Central Australia, European settlement and early frontier contact between Aboriginal and European people. The first police camp in Alice Springs was established in 1879 at the Alice Springs Telegraph Station. In 1879, William Wilshire, Mounted Constable William Wilshire moved the camp via wagon to Heavitree Gap. In 1904, the buildings were proclaimed to be a public gaol under the Prison Act 1869. The condition of the site had deteriorated by the early 1960s and in 1967 work was undertaken to reconstruct it. It is curr ...
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Heavitree
Heavitree is a historic village and parish situated formerly outside the walls of the City of Exeter Exeter () is a city in Devon Devon (, also known as Devonshire) is a Counties of England, county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel in the north to the English Channel in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by C ... in Devon, England, and is today an eastern suburb of that city. It was formerly the first significant village outside the city on the road to London. It was the birthplace of Thomas Bodley Sir Thomas Bodley (2 March 1545 – 28 January 1613) was an English diplomat and scholar A scholar is a person who pursues academic and intellectual activities, particularly those that develop expertise in an area of Studying, study. A schol ..., and Richard Hooker Richard Hooker (25 March, 1554 – 2 November 1600) was an English priest A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the Sacred rite, sacred rituals of a r ...
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Overland Telegraph
The Australian Overland Telegraph Line was a telegraphy, telegraph line that connected Darwin, Northern Territory, Darwin with Port Augusta, South Australia, Port Augusta in South Australia. Completed in 1872, the Overland Telegraph Line allowed fast communication between Australia and the rest of the world. An additional section was added in 1877 with the completion of the Western Australian section of the line. It was one of the great engineering feats of 19th-century Australia and probably the most significant milestone in the history of telegraphy in Australia. Conception and competition By 1855 speculation had intensified about possible routes for the connection of Australia to the new telegraph cable in Java and thus Europe. Among the routes under consideration were either Ceylon to Albany, Western Australia, Albany in Western Australia, or Java (island), Java to the north coast of Australia and then either onto east coast, or south through the centre of the continent to ...
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Central Australia Railway
The former Central Australia Railway, which was built between 1878 and 1929 and closed in 1980, was a Narrow-gauge railway, 1067 mm narrow gauge railway between Port Augusta railway station, Port Augusta and Alice Springs. A standard gauge line duplicated the southern section from Port Augusta to Maree in 1957 on a new nearby alignment. The entire Central Australia Railway was superseded in 1980 after the standard gauge Tarcoola–Alice Springs Railway was opened, using a new route up to 200 km to the west. A small southern section of the original line between Port Augusta and Quorn, South Australia, Quorn has been preserved as the Pichi Richi Railway, Pichi Richi Tourist Railway. Naming Whilst officially the ''Central Australia Railway'', it has been known by a number of names. Initially the northern end point had not be determined. Government acts and the press used a number of terms prior to construction including * The Port Augusta Railway * The Northern Railway ...
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