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Guildhall
A guildhall, also known as a "guild hall" or "guild house", is a historical building originally used for tax collecting by municipalities or merchants in Great Britain and the Low Countries. These buildings commonly become town halls and in some cases museums while retaining their original names. Guildhalls as town hall in the United Kingdom In the United Kingdom, a guildhall is usually a town hall: in the vast majority of cases, the guildhalls have never served as the meeting place of any specific guild. A suggested etymology is from the Anglo Saxon "''gild'', or "payment"; the guildhall being where citizens came to pay their rates. The London Guildhall was established around 1120. For the Scottish municipal equivalent see tolbooth. List of guildhalls in the United Kingdom *Andover Guildhall * Barnstaple Guildhall * Bath Guildhall *Beverley Guildhall * Bewdley Guildhall *Blakeney Guildhall *Boston Guildhall * Brecon Guildhall *Bristol Guildhall *Bury St Edmunds Guildhall *Ca ...
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Guildhall, Barnstaple
The Guildhall in Barnstaple in Devon in the United Kingdom is the Guildhall for the town and was completed in 1828, replacing an earlier Guildhall. Beneath and behind the Guildhall is the Pannier Market; completed in 1855, the building has been a Grade II* listed building since 19 January 1951. The Guildhall The Guildhall is located on Barnstaple's High Street, on the corner with Butchers' Row. Originally, a meat market was on the present site with a corn market above made up of 34 stalls running from the High Street to Anchor Lane, about halfway down the length of the present Pannier Market. The people of Barnstaple were unwilling to extend the market further at this time as they were concerned at the high cost required to buy the site and feared that a Pannier Market in the town would not be a success. Meanwhile, vegetables and dairy goods continued to be sold from panniers outside on either side of the High Street. Eventually it was decided to build a Guildhall on the High ...
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Guildhall, Derry
The Guildhall in Derry, Northern Ireland, is a guildhall in which the elected members of Derry City and Strabane District Council meet. It is a Grade A listed building. History The current building was preceded by an earlier town hall called the Market House which was built in the 17th century and destroyed in the Siege of Derry in 1689. The current building, which was designed by John Guy Ferguson and financed by The Honourable The Irish Society, was completed in 1890. The design for the clock tower was modelled on the Elizabeth Tower in London. After a disastrous fire in 1908, in which only the tower and rear block survived, and more funding from The Honourable The Irish Society, the Guildhall was rebuilt to the design of Mathew Alexander Robinson in 1912. The current organ, which was designed by Sir Walter Parratt and has 3,132 pipes, was installed in 1914. During The Troubles, the Guildhall was the focus of multiple terror attacks. The building was badly damaged by two ...
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Guildhall, Bath
Guildhall is an 18th-century municipal building in central Bath, Somerset, England. It is a Grade I listed building. History The earliest mention of a guildhall here was in 1359, where it used to be the meeting place of the powerful trade guilds. The medieval guildhall (situated behind the modern building) was mentioned by Elizabeth Holland in 1602 as a timber-framed building with a tiled roof and stone floors strewn with rushes. This building was replaced by a Jacobean guildhall, on approximately the same site, in 1625. The building consisted of a council chamber and an armoury (where weapons were stored prior to the civil war) on the first floor. By the end of the 17th century, the room was used for social gatherings, concerts and plays. The building was considerably enlarged to a design by William Killigrew in 1725, and a series of specially commissioned paintings by Jan Baptist van Diest was subsequently put on display. The current Bath stone building, designed by Thomas ...
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Cambridge Guildhall
Cambridge Guildhall is a civic building in the centre of the historic city of Cambridge, England. It includes two halls, ''The Large Hall'' and ''The Small Hall'', and is used for many disparate events such as comedy acts, conferences, craft fairs, live music, talks, and weddings. It is also used by the University of Cambridge for certain examinations. It is owned and managed by the Cambridge City Council, and it is their seat of government. The Guildhall is located on the south side of Market Hill, the market square in Cambridge, between Peas Hill to the west and Guildhall Street to the east. It is a Grade II listed building. History The earliest known property on the site was a house, previously owned by a Jew known as Benjamin, which King Henry III granted to the town for use as a prison in 1224. An adjoining synagogue was leased to the Franciscans who later moved to a convent on a site where Sidney Sussex College now stands. In 1270 the premises became the "tolbooth" as ...
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Blakeney Guildhall
Blakeney Guildhall is a building in the coastal village of Blakeney in the north of the county of Norfolk. The property is in the care of English Heritage but is managed by the local parish council. Blakeney is just off the A149 coast road and is nine miles west of Sheringham. The property can be found in an alley just off the quay. It is a scheduled monument. Origins The building has always traditionally been called the Guildhall but nothing is known of its early history. It is likely to have originally been built for a prosperous medieval Blakeney fish merchant, the undercroft being used for storage of his merchandise. The building later became the guildhall of Blakeney's guild of fish merchants. The Guildhall was once a two-storey building but now all that remains is the 14th-century brick-vaulted undercroft. It is divided into two aisles by a row of stone piers which support the ribbed vaults of brickwork. The doorway and the windows are all original. The bricks, no doubt, ...
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Devonport Guildhall
Devonport Guildhall is a municipal building that served as a municipal hall, courthouse, mortuary, and police station, located in the municipal centre of the town of Devonport, in Plymouth, Devon, England. The site fell into disrepair and since the mid-1980s has been repurposed for community facilities. It is a Grade I listed building. History The building of the guildhall The guildhall, which was designed by John Foulston in the Regency style with Greek Doric features, was completed between 1821 and 1824. Foulston designed a cluster of four buildings together in the area: the Guildhall, Column and Oddfellow's Hall still stand today whilst his Mount Zion Calvinist Chapel is now lost. The area of Devonport was then called Plymouth Dock and the presence of the Royal Navy brought prosperity to the area. A petition was taken to King George IV, who granted permission for the area to be called Devonport in 1824. Devonport Guildhall was home to the magistrates court and the Mayor' ...
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Bury St Edmunds Guildhall
Bury St Edmunds Guildhall is a municipal building in the Guildhall Street, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. It is a Grade I listed building. History The Guildhall is one of the largest and most impressive secular medieval buildings in the country, and a rare survival of a civic building from this period. The building, which was built with financial support from the wealthy Bury St Edmunds Abbey, dates back to 1220. The ''Bury Chronicle'' records that John of Cobham and Walter de Heliun visited the guildhall in 1279. The oldest part is the thirteenth-century stone entrance arch, within the highly decorative porch was added in the late 15th century. Its unique roof structure combines East Anglian queen posts with king posts and has been attributed to the fifteenth century, although some suggest it is midfourteenth century. Many timbers are covered in yellow ochre, usually a sixteenth-century feature. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the late 1530s, the guildhall passed ...
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Boston Guildhall
Boston Guildhall is a former municipal building in Boston, Lincolnshire. It currently serves as a local museum and also as a venue for civil ceremonies and private functions. It is a Grade I listed building. History St. Mary's Guild in Boston was founded as a merchant guild by a group of individuals in 1260. The guildhall, based on evidence from dendrochronology, was built in 1390, just two years before incorporation of the guild and probably in anticipation of that event. The guild became wealthy as a result of extensive gifts received in the 14th and 15th centuries and an inventory shows that it held various items of gold, silver and gilt, as well as the sacred relics. As a result of the dissolution of the chantries and religious guilds, imposed by King Edward VI, the guildhall was confiscated by the Crown and passed to the Boston Corporation in 1555. In autumn 1607 a group of Puritans led by William Brewster, now known to as the Pilgrim Fathers, were brought before the magist ...
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Bristol Guildhall
Bristol Guildhall is a municipal building in Broad Street, Bristol, England. It is a Grade II* listed building. It was built in the 1840s on the site of the previous guildhall and used as a courthouse from the 1860s to 1993. Various plans for its use as an art gallery and hotel were then proposed. In March 2020 it was damaged by a fire which led to its roof collapsing. History An earlier guildhall was built for a Guild of Merchants on the site in the 13th century. The current building, which was designed by Richard Shackleton Pope in the Gothic Revival style, was completed in 1846, incorporating fragments of the earlier Guildhall on the site. The building included statues created by John Thomas of Bristol and stained glass from Rogers of Worcester. It was extended, to designs by T. S. Pope and J. Bindon, to accommodate the assize courts in 1867. After judicial activities transferred to the new Bristol Crown Court building in 1993, the guildhall was converted into an art gal ...
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Beverley Guildhall
The Guildhall is a municipal facility at Register Square in Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is a Grade I listed building. History The building, which dates back to 1320, was acquired from a householder, Edward Mynskyp, for use as a meeting place by the town officials in 1501. It was remodelled internally by William Middleton in 1762. It was remodelled again, both internally and externally in 1832, when the original arched entrance was removed and a large portico with four Doric order columns and a pediment above, designed by Charles Mountain the Younger, was installed on the front of the building. The courtroom, located on the ground floor on the south side of the building, features a Rococo-style stucco ceiling, created by the stuccoist, Giuseppe Cortese (1704-1779), which was installed at the time of the remodelling by Middleton. The courtroom was used as the sole facility for dispensing justice in the town until the Sessions House at New Walk opened in 1814. ...
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The Guildhall, Chard
The Guildhall is a town hall and community building in the town of Chard in the English county of Somerset. History The Guildhall was built in 1834-35 to replace the town's original 16th century guildhall and market house. Owing to the inconvenient position of the original hall at Fore Street, the decision to erect a replacement was finalised in 1833. The foundation stone of the new hall was laid on 20 December 1834, and the building first opened on 21 September 1835. Designed by the local architect Richard Carver of Taunton in the Classical style, it originally incorporated a town hall, market house and butchery, and had cost over £3,000 to build. The guildhall clock was installed to celebrate the accession of Queen Victoria to the throne in 1837. The building has been Grade II* listed since 1950. Much of the building's interior was remodelled around 1970, with the entire building later undergoing renovation work between 1998 and 2003. The weather vane on top of the build ...
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Carmarthen Guildhall
Carmarthen Guildhall ( cy, Neuadd y Dref Caerfyrddin) is a municipal structure in Guildhall Square, Carmarthen, Wales. The guildhall, which was the headquarters of Carmarthen Borough Council, is a Grade I listed building. History The building was commissioned to replace a 16th-century guildhall which, by 1765, had become very dilapidated and had to be demolished in 1766. Some £4,000 towards the cost of the new building was donated by the future local Member of Parliament, John Adams. The foundation stone for the new building was laid on 10 April 1767: it was designed by Sir Robert Taylor in the neoclassical style, built in rubble masonry and completed in 1777. The design involved a symmetrical main frontage with three bays facing onto Guildhall Square; it was originally arcaded on the ground floor, so that markets could be held, with assembly rooms on the first floor. The ground floor was rusticated with Tuscan order columns supporting an entablature and a balustrade, ...
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