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Edward Kelley
Sir Edward Kelley or Kelly, also known as Edward Talbot (; 1 August 1555 – 1597/8),Schleiner 2004. was an English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually become the World language, leading lan ... Renaissance occultist and self-declared spirit medium Mediumship is the practice of purportedly mediating communication between spirit In folk beliefIn folkloristics, folk belief or folk-belief is a broad genre of folklore that is often expressed in narratives, Tradition, customs, rituals, foodw .... He is best known for working with John Dee John Dee (13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) was an Anglo-Welsh mathematician, astronomer An astronomer is a scientist in the field of astronomy who focuses their studies on a specific question or field outside the scope of Earth. They observe as ... in his magical i ...
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Worcester, England
Worcester ( ) is a cathedral city and the ceremonial county town of Worcestershire, England, south-west of Birmingham, north-west of London, north of Gloucester and north-east of Hereford. The estimated population in 2019 was 102,791. The River Severn flanks the western side of the city centre. It is overlooked by Worcester Cathedral. The Battle of Worcester in 1651 was the final one in the English Civil War, where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army defeated King Charles II of England, Charles II's Cavalier, Royalists. Worcester is the home of Royal Worcester, Royal Worcester Porcelain, composer Edward Elgar, Lea & Perrins, makers of traditional Worcestershire sauce, the University of Worcester, and ''Berrow's Worcester Journal'', claimed as the world's oldest newspaper. History Early history The trade route past Worcester, later part of the Roman roads in Britain, Roman Ryknild Street, dates from Neolithic times. It commanded a ford crossing over the River Severn, which was ...
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Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor
Rudolf II (18 July 1552 – 20 January 1612) was Holy Roman Emperor (1576–1612), King of Hungary and Kingdom of Croatia (Habsburg), Croatia (as Rudolf I, 1572–1608), King of Bohemia (1575–1608/1611) and Archduke of Austria (1576–1608). He was a member of the House of Habsburg. Rudolf's legacy has traditionally been viewed in three ways:Hotson, 1999. an ineffectual ruler whose mistakes led directly to the Thirty Years' War; a great and influential patron of Northern Mannerist art; and an intellectual devotee of occult arts and learning which helped seed what would be called the scientific revolution. Early life Rudolf was born in Vienna on 18 July 1552. He was the eldest son and successor of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bohemia, and King of Hungary and Kingdom of Croatia (Habsburg), Croatia; his mother was the Spanish princess Maria of Austria, Holy Roman Empress, Maria, a daughter of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, ...
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Papal Nuncio
An apostolic nuncio ( la, nuntius apostolicus; also known as a papal nuncio or simply as a nuncio) is an ecclesiastical {{Short pages monitor

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Kraków
Kraków (), also written in English as Krakow and traditionally known as Cracow, is the second-largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula, Vistula River in Lesser Poland Voivodeship, the city dates back to the seventh century. Kraków was the official capital of Poland until 1596 and has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, economic, cultural and artistic life. Cited as one of Europe's most beautiful cities, its Kraków Old Town, Old Town was declared the first UNESCO World Heritage Site in the world. The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland's second-most-important city. It began as a hamlet on Wawel Castle, Wawel Hill and was reported as a busy trading centre of Central Europe in 965. With the establishment of new universities and cultural venues at the emergence of the Second Polish Republic in 1918 and throughout the 20th century, Kraków reaffirmed its role as a major national academic and artistic ce ...
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Stefan I Of Poland
Stefan may refer to: * Stefan (given name) * Stefan (surname) * Ștefan, a given name and a surname * Štefan, a Slavic given name and surname * Stefan (footballer) (born 1988), Brazilian footballer * Stefan Heym, pseudonym of German writer Helmut Flieg (1913–2001) * Stefan (honorific), a Serbian title * Stefan (album), ''Stefan'' (album), a 1987 album by Dennis González See also

* Stefan number, a dimensionless number used in heat transfer * Sveti Stefan or Saint Stefan, a small islet in Montenegro * Stefanus (other) {{Disambiguation ...
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Olbracht Łaski
Olbracht Łaski (died 23 November 1604) was a Polish people, Polish nobleman, an alchemist and courtier during the reign of Stephen Batory. Łaski was suspected of plotting to seize the Polish throne in 1575, following the brief reign of Henry Valois#Polish reign .281573.E2.80.931574.29, Henry Valois. This episode is featured in the opéra-comique ''Le roi malgré lui'' by Emmanuel Chabrier (first performed on 18 May 1887). Łaski was particularly notable for his fine beard, which Holinshed noted was of "such length and breadth, as that lying in his bed, and parting it with his hands, the same overspread his breasts and shoulders, himself greatly delighting therein, and reputing it an ornament." Łaski arrived in England in April 1583. The French people, French ambassador, Michel de Castelnau suggested that his visit was prompted by a desire to persuade the Muscovy Company to refrain from selling arms to Ivan the Terrible. He was provided with lodgings at Winchester Palace, Winch ...
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Czech Republic
The Czech Republic, also known by its short-form name Czechia and formerly known as Bohemia, is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is bordered by Austria to the south, Germany to the west, Poland to the northeast, and Slovakia to the east. The Czech Republic has a hilly landscape that covers an area of with a mostly temperate Humid continental climate, continental and oceanic climate. The Duchy of Bohemia was founded in the late 9th century under Great Moravia. It was formally recognized as an Imperial Estate, Imperial State of the Holy Roman Empire in 1002 and became Kingdom of Bohemia, a kingdom in 1198. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the whole Lands of the Bohemian Crown, Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy. The Protestantism, Protestant Bohemian Revolt led to the Thirty Years' War. After the Battle of the White Mountain, the Habsburgs consolidated their rule. With the dissolution of the Holy Empire in 1806, the Crown ...
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Bohemia
Bohemia ( ; cs, Čechy ; ; hsb, Čěska; szl, Czechy) is the westernmost and largest historical region Historical regions (or historical areas) are geographical Geography (from Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country loca ... of the Czech lands#REDIRECT Czech lands The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands ( cs, České země ) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia. Together the three have formed the Czech part of Czechoslovakia since 1918, the Czech Soci ... in the present-day Czech Republic The Czech Republic, also known by its short-form name Czechia and formerly known as Bohemia, is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is bordered by Austria to the south, Germany to the west, Poland to the northeast, and Slovakia to .... Bohemia can also refer to a wider area consisting of the historical Lands ...
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Elias Ashmole
Elias Ashmole (; 23 May 1617 – 18 May 1692) was an English antiquary 's cabinet of curiosities, from ''Museum Wormianum,'' 1655 An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originall ..., politician, officer of arms An officer of arms is a person appointed by a sovereign or Sovereign state, state with authority to perform one or more of the following functions: * to control and initiate coat of arms, armorial matters; * to arrange and participate in Ceremony, ..., astrologer Astrology is a pseudoscience Pseudoscience consists of statements, beliefs, or practices that claim to be both scientific and factual but are incompatible with the scientific method The scientific method is an Empirical evidenc ... and student of alchemy Alchemy (from Arabic Arabic (, ' or , ' or ) is a Semitic language The Semitic ...
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Glastonbury Abbey
Glastonbury Abbey was a monastery in Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Its ruins, a grade I listed building and scheduled ancient monument, are open as a visitor attraction. The abbey was founded in the 8th century and enlarged in the 10th. It was destroyed by a major fire in 1184, but subsequently rebuilt and by the 14th century was one of the richest and most powerful monasteries in England. The abbey controlled large tracts of the surrounding land and was instrumental in major drainage projects on the Somerset Levels. The abbey was suppressed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII of England. The last abbot, Richard Whiting (abbot), Richard Whiting (Whyting), was hanged, drawn and quartered as a traitor on Glastonbury Tor in 1539. From at least the 12th century the Glastonbury area has been associated with the legend of King Arthur, a connection promoted by medieval monks who asserted that Glastonbury was Avalon. Christian legends have claimed that the ...
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Spiritual Creature
In ontology and the philosophy of mind, a non-physical entity is an Object (philosophy), object that exists outside physical reality. The philosophical schools of idealism and dualism (philosophy of mind), dualism assert that such entities exist, while physicalism asserts that they do not. Positing the existence of non-physical entities leads to further questions concerning their inherent nature and their relation to physical entities. Abstract concepts Philosophers generally do agree on the existence of abstract objects. The mind can conceive of objects that clearly have no physical counterpart. Such objects include concepts such as numbers, mathematical set (mathematics), sets and function (mathematics), functions, and philosophical relation (philosophy), relations and property (philosophy), properties. If such objects are indeed entities, they are entities that exist only mind itself, not within spacetime, space and time. For an example, an abstract property such as redne ...
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Elizabeth Jane Weston
Elizabeth Jane Weston ( la, Elisabetha Ioanna Westonia; cs, Alžběta Johana Vestonie) (1581 or 1582, in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire – 23 November 1612, in Prague Prague ( ; cs, Praha ; german: Prag, ; la, Praga) is the capital and largest city A city is a large human settlement In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people ...). Elizabeth was an English-Czech poet, known for her Neo-Latin poetry. She had the unusual distinction for a woman of the time of having her poetry published. Biography and early life Elizabeth was born to Joanna Cooper (23 June 1563 in Chipping Norton Chipping Norton is a market town and Civil parishes in England, civil parish in the Cotswold Hills in the West Oxfordshire district of Oxfordshire, England, about south-west of Banbury and north-west of Oxford. The United Kingdom Census 2011, ...Clucas, p. 288 - 1606) and her first husband, John Weston, about ...
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