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Dorothy Wadham
Dorothy Wadham (; ''née'' Petre) (1534/1535 – 16 May 1618) was the wife of Nicholas Wadham (1531–1609), Nicholas Wadham (1531-1609) of Merryfield, Ilton, Merryfield in the parish of Ilton, Somerset and of Edge, Branscombe, Edge in the parish of Branscombe, Devon and as his widow in pursuance of his wishes, was the foundress of Wadham College, Oxford. She has the distinction of being the first woman who was not a member of the Royal Family or titled aristocracy to found a college at Oxford or Cambridge. Origins Dorothy was the second and eldest surviving child of the very wealthy Sir William Petre (c.1505-1572), Secretary of State (England), Secretary of State to four successive Tudor monarchs (namely Kings Henry VIII of England, Henry VIII, Edward VI of England, Edward VI and Queens Mary I of England, Mary I and Elizabeth I of England, Elizabeth I), who had acquired much property following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Her mother was Gertrude Tyrrell, daughter of Sir J ...
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Dorothy Petre Mrs Wadham
Dorothy may refer to: *Dorothy (given name), a list of people with that name. The meaning of the name. Arts and entertainment Characters *Dorothy Gale, protagonist of ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' by L. Frank Baum *Ace (Doctor Who), Ace (''Doctor Who'') or Dorothy, a character played by Sophie Aldred in ''Doctor Who'' *Dorothy, a goldfish on ''Sesame Street'' owned by Elmo *Dorothy the Dinosaur, a costumed green dinosaur who appears with The Wiggles *Dorothy, the title of an Old English dance and folk song by Seymour Smith *Dorothy (MÄR), Dorothy (''MÄR''), a main character in ''MÄR'' *Dorothy Michaels, Dustin Hoffman's character the movie ''Tootsie'' *Dorothy "Dottie" Turner, main character of ''Servant (TV series), Servant'' portrayed by Lauren Ambrose *Dorothy Vallens, a character in the 1986 film ''Blue Velvet (film), Blue Velvet'' portrayed by Isabella Rossellini Film and television *Dorothy (TV series), ''Dorothy'' (TV series), 1979 American TV series *Dorothy Mi ...
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Act Of Parliament
Acts of parliament, sometimes referred to as primary legislation, are texts of law passed by the Legislature, legislative body of a jurisdiction (often a parliament or council). In most countries, acts of parliament begin as a Bill (law), bill, which the legislature votes on. Depending on the structure of government, this text may then by subject to assent or approval from the Executive (government), executive branch. Bills A draft Act of Parliament is known as a Bill (proposed law), bill. In other words, a bill is a proposed law that needs to be discussed in the parliament before it can become a law. In territories with a Westminster system, most bills that have any possibility of becoming law are introduced into parliament by the government. This will usually happen following the publication of a "white paper", setting out the issues and the way in which the proposed new law is intended to deal with them. A bill may also be introduced into parliament without formal government ba ...
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Recusancy
Recusancy, from the Latin ''recusare'' (to refuse), was the state of those who remained loyal to the Catholic Church and refused to attend Church of England services after the English Reformation. The Act of Uniformity 1558, 1558 Recusancy Acts passed in the reign of Elizabeth I, and temporarily repealed in the Interregnum (1649–1660), remained on the statute books until 1888. They imposed punishments such as fines, property confiscation and imprisonment on recusants. The suspension under Oliver Cromwell was mainly intended to give relief to Nonconformist (Protestantism), nonconforming Protestants rather than to Catholics, to whom some restrictions applied into the 1920s, through the Act of Settlement 1701, despite the 1828 Catholic Emancipation. In some cases those adhering to Catholicism faced capital punishment, and some English and Welsh Catholics who were executed in the 16th and 17th centuries have been Canonization, canonised by the Catholic Church as List of Catholic m ...
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Recusant
Recusancy, from the Latin ''recusare'' (to refuse), was the state of those who remained loyal to the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian ... and refused to attend Church of England The Church of England (C of E) is a Christian church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Critic ... services after the English Reformation The English Reformation took place in 16th-century England when the Church of England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church. These events were, in part, associated with the wider European Protestant Reformati .... The 1558 Recusancy Acts passed in ...
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Somerset
( en, All The People of Somerset) , locator_map = , coordinates = , region = South West England South West England is one of nine official regions of England The regions, formerly known as the government office regions, are the highest tier of sub-national division in England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, count ... , established_date = Ancient Ancient history is the aggregate of past eventsWordNet Search – 3.0
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, established_by = , preceded_by = , origin = , lord_lieutenant_office =Lord Lieutenant of Somerset , lord_lieutenant_name = Anne Maw , high_sheriff_office =High Sheriff of Somerset , high_sheriff_name = Mrs Mary-Clare Rodwell (2020–21) , area_total_km2 = 4171 , area_total_rank = 7th , ethnicity = 98.5% White , county_cou ...
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John Prince (biographer)
Rev. John Prince (1643–1723), vicar of Totnes and Berry Pomeroy in Devon, England, was a biographer. He is best known for his ''List of Worthies of Devon, Worthies of Devon'', a series of biographies of Devon-born notables covering the period before the Norman Conquest to his own era. He became the subject of a sexual scandal, the court records of which were made into a book in 2001 and a play in 2005. Origins John Prince was born in 1643 in a farmhouse (now called Prince's Abbey) on the site of Newenham Abbey, in the parish of Axminster, Devon. He was the eldest son of Bernard Prince (died 1689) (to whom John erected a monument in Axminster Church) by his first wife Mary Crocker, daughter of John Crocker,Courtney, William Prideaux. "s:Prince, John (1643-1723) (DNB00), Prince, John (1643–1723)", ''Dictionary of National Biography'', London, 1885–1900, Volume 46. of the ancient Crocker family seated at Lyneham House in the parish of Yealmpton, Devon. Lyneham was, After ''Hel ...
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City Of London
The City of London is a city A city is a large .Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. It can be defined as a permanent and s ..., ceremonial county The counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies, also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England and informally known as ceremonial counties, are areas of England to which lord-lieutenant, lord-lieutenants are appointed. Legal ... and local government district The districts of England (also known as local authority districts or local government districts to distinguish from unofficial city districts) are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. As the str ... that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district A central business district (CBD) is the commercial and business center ...
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Aldersgate
Aldersgate was one of the northern gates Gates is the plural of gate Candi bentar, a typical Indonesian gate that is often found on the islands of Java">Indonesia.html" ;"title="Candi bentar, a typical Indonesia">Candi bentar, a typical Indonesian gate that is often found on the isl ... in the London Wall The London Wall was a defensive wall A defensive wall is a fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region dur ... which once enclosed the City of London The City of London is a city A city is a large .Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. It .... It gave its name to the City Ward Ward may refer to: Division or unit * Hospital#Departments or wards, Hospital ward, a hosp ...
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Ingatestone Hall
Ingatestone Hall is a Listed building, Grade I listed 16th-century manor house in Essex, England. It is located outside the village of Ingatestone, approximately south west of Chelmsford and north east of London. The house was built by Sir William Petre, and his descendants (Baron Petre, the Barons Petre) live in the house to this day. Part of the house is leased out as offices while the current John Petre, 18th Baron Petre, Lord Petre's son and heir apparent lives in a private wing with his family. The hall is open to the public on selected afternoons between Easter and September. History William Petre bought Ingatestone manor soon after the Dissolution of the Monasteries for some £850 and commissioned the building of the house. In June 1561, Elizabeth I of England, Queen Elizabeth I spent several nights at Ingatestone Hall on her royal progress, where she held court (royal), court. The Petre family laid on a lavish welcome, procuring food and drink and decorating the hous ...
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Old Shute House
::See also: New Shute House Old Shute House (known as Shute Barton between about 1789 and the 20th century), located at Shute, Devon, Shute, near Colyton, Devon, Colyton, Axminster, Devon, is the remnant of a mediaeval manor house with Tudor additions, today in the ownership of the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, National Trust. It was given a Listed Building, Grade I listing on 14 December 1955. It is one of the most important non-fortified manor houses of the Middle Ages still in existence. It was built about 1380 as a hall house and was greatly expanded in the late 16th century and partly demolished in 1785. The original 14th-century house survives, although much altered. This article is based on the work of Bridie (1955), which has however been superseded as the standard work of reference on the architectural history of the building by the unpublished Exeter Archaeology Report of 2008 produced for the National Trust for Places of Historic Intere ...
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