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Brian Tuke
Sir ''Sir'' is a formal English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually becom ... Brian Tuke (died 1545), was the secretary of Henry VIII Henry VIII (28 June 149128 January 1547) was King of England from 22 April 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry is best known for Wives of Henry VIII, his six marriages, including his efforts to have his first marriage (to Catherine of Aragon ... and Cardinal Wolsey Thomas Wolsey (c. March 1473 – 29 November 1530) was an English statesman and Catholic bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a posi .... He became treasurer of the household. Life He may have been the son of Richard Tuke (died 1498?) and Agnes his wife, daughter of John Bland of Nottingha ...
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Edward North, 1st Baron North
Edward North, 1st Baron North ( 1504 – 1564) was an English peer Peer may refer to: Sociology * Peer, an equal in age, education or social class; see Peer group * Peer, a member of the peerage Computing * Peer, one of several functional units in the same layer of a network; See Peer group (computer networking) ... and politician. He was the Clerk of the Parliaments The Clerk of the Parliaments is the chief clerk A clerk ( or ) is a white-collar worker A white-collar worker is a person who performs professional, desk, managerial, or administrative work. White-collar work may be performed in an office or ... 1531–1540 and Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire 1557–1564. A successful lawyer, he was created the first Baron North, giving him a seat in the House of Lords. Family Born about 1504, North was the only son of Roger North of Nottinghamshire, a merchant and haberdasher, and Christiana, the daughter of Richard Warcup of Sinnington, Yorkshire. After the death of Ro ...
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William Thynne
William Thynne (died 10 August 1546) was an English courtier and editor of Geoffrey Chaucer's works. Life Thynne's family bore the alternative surname of Botfield or Boteville, and he is sometimes called "Thynne ''alias'' Boteville". In 1524 he was second clerk of the kitchen in the household of Henry VIII, and by 1526 he had become chief clerk of the kitchen, with full control of royal banquets. The office was connected with the board of green cloth, and its holder enjoyed an official lodging at Greenwich. The king showed Thynne favour, in grants. On 20 August 1528 he became bailiff of the town and keeper of the park of Bewdley. On 21 July 1529 he was appointed customer of wools, hides, and fleeces in the port of London, and on 8 October 1529 receiver-general of the earldom of March and keeper of Gateley Park, Wigmoresland. In 1531 Thynne obtained from the prior and convent of Christchurch, near Aldgate in London, a lease of the rectorial tithe of Erith in Kent, and in a house the ...
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John Leland (antiquary)
John Leland or Leyland (13 September,  – 18 April 1552) was an English poet and antiquary 's cabinet of curiosities, from ''Museum Wormianum,'' 1655 An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originall ....Carley (2006), "Leland, John (''ca''. 1503–1552)" Leland has been described as "the father of English local history and bibliography". His ''Itinerary'' provided a unique source of observations and raw materials for many subsequent antiquaries, and introduced the county as the basic unit for studying the local history of England, an idea that has been influential ever since. Early life and education Most evidence for Leland's life and career comes from his own writings, especially his poetry. He was born in London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) i ...
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After Holbein II, Sir Brian Tuke
After may refer to: Literature *After (Elgar), ''After'' (Elgar), an 1895 poem by Philip Bourke Marston set to music by Edward Elgar *After (Prose novel), ''After'' (Prose novel), a 2003 novel by Francine Prose *After... (visual novel), ''After...'' (visual novel), a 2003 eroge visual novel *After (book), ''After'' (book), a 2005 book by Canadian writer Francis Chalifour *After (Todd novel), ''After'' (Todd novel), a 2013 novel by Anna Todd, originated as a fan fiction book on Wattpad Music *After (Ihsahn album), ''After'' (Ihsahn album), 2010 * After (Lady Lamb album), ''After'' (Lady Lamb album), 2015 *After (Sammi Cheng album), ''After'' (Sammi Cheng album), 1995 *After (song), "After" (song), a 2011 song by Moby *(after), a 2018 live album by Mount Eerie *"After", a 2014 song by Amy Lee featuring Dave Eggar from the album ''Aftermath (Amy Lee soundtrack), Aftermath'' TV and film * After (2012 film), ''After'' (2012 film), a 2012 sci-fi thriller film written and directed by ...
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Maidstone
Maidstone is the largest town A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origin and use The word "town" shares a ... in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), William and Robert ..., England, of which it is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some pref .... Maidstone is historically important and lies 32 miles (51 km) east-south-east of London. The River Medway The River Medway is a river in South ...
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Samuel Argall
Sir Samuel Argall (1572 or 1580 – 24 January 1626) was an English English usually refers to: * English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually become the World language, leading lan ... adventurer and naval officer. As a sea captain, in 1609, Argall was the first to determine a shorter northern route from England across the Atlantic Ocean to the new English colony of Virginia Virginia (), officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a in the and regions of the , between the and the . The geography and climate of the are shaped by the and the , which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capit ..., based at Jamestown, and made numerous voyages to the New World The "New World" is a term for the majority of Earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbour and s ...
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Scot's Hall
Scot's Hall (or Scott's Hall) is a country house in Smeeth, between Ashford, Kent, Ashford and Folkestone in southeast England. It was the property of a gentry family, the Scotts. The first known resident was Sir John Scott (born 1436), who married Caroline Carter. From the beginning of the fourteenth century to the end of the eighteenth century, the Scotts, who were the descendants of the Baliols, were influential in Kent, also owning Chilham Castle. Scott's Hall was the centre of the dynasty and ''there was a time when one could ride from Scot's Hall to London without leaving Scott Property,''Scott Family History
a journey of over fifty miles. During the reign of Elizabeth I, it was described as one of ''the most splendid houses in Kent''. Samuel Pepys was a regular visitor in the seventeenth century: the ...
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George Tuchet, 9th Baron Audley
George Tuchet, 9th Baron Audley, 6th Baron Tuchet (died June 1560) was an English peer. George Tuchet was the son of John Tuchet, 8th Baron Audley (born c. 1483). He married twice; firstly Elizabeth Tuke, daughter of Sir Brian Tuke before 30 August 1538 and secondly Joan Platt at Chester in 1559. He inherited his title by writ in 1557. He died in June and was buried 3 July 1560 in St Margaret's, Westminster, St Margaret's Church, Westminster. He was succeeded by his only son, Henry Tuchet, 10th Baron Audley (died 1563). References ThePeerage.com entry
, - 1560 deaths Barons Audley, *09 16th-century English nobility Year of birth unknown {{England-baron-stub ...
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Woolwich
Woolwich () is a district in southeast The points of the compass are the vectors by which planet A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or Stellar evolution#Stellar remnants, stellar remnant that is massive enough to be Hydrostatic equilibrium, rounded by its own gravity ... London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller lowerc ..., England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. E ..., within the Royal Borough of Greenwich The Royal Borough of Greenwich (, , or ) is a London borough The London boroughs are the 32 districts of England, local authori ...
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Lothbury
Lothbury is a short street in the City of London. It runs east–west with traffic flow in both directions, from Gresham Street's junction with Moorgate to the west, and Bartholomew Lane's junction with Throgmorton Street to the east. History The area was populated with coppersmiths in the Middle Ages before later becoming home to a number of merchants and bankers. According to John Stow, Stow, the street was "possessed for the most part by founders that cast candlesticks, chafing dishes, spice mortars, and such-like copper or laton works, and do afterwards turn them with the foot and not with the wheel, to make them smooth and bright with turning and scratching (as some do term it), making a loathsome noise to the by-passers that have not been used to the like, and therefore by them disdainfully called Lothberie". Lothbury was the location of the Whalebone (Lothbury), Whalebone, a meeting place for the radical Leveller movement in the mid seventeenth-century. At the beginnin ...
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Layer Marney
Layer Marney is a village and civil parish near to Tiptree Tiptree is a village and civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government Local government is a generic term for the lowest tiers of public administration Public administration i ..., in the Colchester borough, in the county of Essex Essex () is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), William and Ro ..., England. Layer Marney has a Tudor palace called Layer Marney Tower Layer Marney Tower Gatehouse, the tallest Tudor gatehouse in Britain Layer Marney Tower is a Tudor palace, composed of buildings, gardens and parkland, dating from 1520 situated in Layer Marney, Essex Essex () is a Ceremonial counties of Eng ... and a church called Church of St Mary the Virgin. In 200 ...
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