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Thetford Academy, Vermont
Thetford Academy is a coeducational independent school in Thetford, Vermont. Located at 304 Academy Road in Thetford Center, Vermont, it is the state's oldest secondary school. Thetford Academy celebrated its bicentennial year in 2018–2019. An historic New England Town Academy (one of approximately 20 remaining in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, and Connecticut), Thetford Academy serves as the designated public school for the town of Thetford. The academy also has partnership agreements with the towns of Strafford, Vermont and Lyme, New Hampshire, and serves several towns that provide students a choice of high schools, or do not have a high school of their own. Thetford Academy also hosts a small contingent of international students from countries including China, South Korea, Greece, and Rwanda. In 2018–2019, Thetford Academy had 301 students enrolled in grades 7–12. History Thetford Academy opened in February 1819, in keeping with a provision of the Constitution of Vermon ...
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Thetford Center, Vermont
Thetford is a town in Orange County, Vermont, United States in the Connecticut River Valley. The population was 2,775 at the 2020 census. Villages within the town include East Thetford, North Thetford, Thetford Hill, Thetford Center, Rices Mills, Union Village, and Post Mills. The town office is in Thetford Center. Thetford is home to Thetford Academy, Vermont's oldest secondary school. Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, formerly Swift Water Girl Scout Council, also has a summer residential camp here called Camp Farnsworth. Camp Farnsworth originally started under private ownership by Chelebe and Madama Farnsworth in 1909 when it was called Camp Hanoum. History The town was created on August 12, 1761 by way of a royal charter which King George III of Great Britain issued to Governor Benning Wentworth of New Hampshire. Wentworth named it for Augustus Henry Fitzroy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, 4th Earl of Arlington and 4th Viscount Thetford, who in 1768 became prime min ...
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Hartland, Vermont
Hartland is a town in Windsor County, Vermont, United States. The population was 3,446 at the 2020 census. It includes the villages of Hartland, Hartland Four Corners, and North Hartland. History Hartland, originally named Hertford, was chartered in 1761. Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 45.2 square miles (117.0 km2), of which 45.0 square miles (116.4 km2) is land and 0.2 square mile (0.6 km2) (0.53%) is water. The Connecticut River forms its eastern boundary, and the Ottauquechee River flows through the northern part of the town. Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 3,223 people, 1,270 households, and 900 families living in the town. The population density was 71.7 people per square mile (27.7/km2). There were 1,382 housing units at an average density of 30.7 per square mile (11.9/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.57% White, 0.12% African American, 0.16% Native Amer ...
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Hannah Slade Currier
Hannah Slade Currier (1829 - June 25, 1915) was and American academic and socialite. She was the youngest daughter of Enoch Slade of Thetford, Vermont, and sister of General Samuel W. Slade, a lawyer of St. Johnsbury. She received her early education in Thetford Academy, at that time one of the most famous institutions in New England. At this school, Miss Slade was one of the top students, both in ordinary studies, and also in the higher branches of Greek, Latin, and mathematics. After leaving the Academy, Slade went to Boston, where she continued her studies in music, French, and other branches of literature. Miss Slade married Moody Currier, a banker in Manchester, New Hampshire, who was in 1885 and 1886 governor of the state. The accomplishments of Mrs. Currier added to the popularity of his administration. After her marriage, she continued her literary and scientific pursuits, adopting the newest in research of her day. Although she has never given to the public any of he ...
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William Closson
William Baxter Palmer Closson (October 13, 1848 - May 30, 1926) was an American artist. Biography He was born in Thetford, Vermont on October 13, 1848. His father David served as a Vermont legislator and his mother Abigail was a descendant of the painter Benjamin West. As a young adult, he was educated at Thetford Academy before graduating and working as a clerk in a railroad office. Soon, he moved to Boston, Massachusetts, and worked as an apprentice wood engraver with Samuel Smith Kilburn. He studied drawing at the Lowell Institute, then went on to work for '' Harper's Magazine'' and various publishing houses in Boston. While in Boston, he shared a studio with painter George Fuller. Seventeen of his paintings are in the American Art collection at the Smithsonian Institution. He also has works on display at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford and the Cleveland Museum of Art. He married Grace Worden Gallaudet Kendall, daughter of Dr. Edward Miner Gallaudet, president of ...
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Union Army
During the American Civil War, the Union Army, also known as the Federal Army and the Northern Army, referring to the United States Army, was the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states. It proved essential to the preservation of the United States as a working, viable republic. The Union Army was made up of the permanent regular army of the United States, but further fortified, augmented, and strengthened by the many temporary units of dedicated volunteers, as well as including those who were drafted in to service as conscripts. To this end, the Union Army fought and ultimately triumphed over the efforts of the Confederate States Army in the American Civil War. Over the course of the war, 2,128,948 men enlisted in the Union Army, including 178,895 colored troops; 25% of the white men who served were immigrants, and further 25% were first generation Americans.McPherson, pp.36–37. Of these soldiers, 596,670 were killed, wounded or went missing ...
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Thomas Morris Chester
Thomas Morris Chester (May 11, 1834 – September 30, 1892) was an American war correspondent, lawyer and soldier who took part in the American Civil War. Early life and education Chester was born at the corner of Third and Market Street in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on May 11, 1834, the fourth child of George and Jane Marie Chester. At the age of 16, Chester attended Akron College, an African-American academy in Pittsburgh. As a student there, his classmates included Jeremiah A. Brown, Benjamin Tucker Tanner, and James T. Bradford.Simmons, William J., and Henry McNeal Turner. Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising. GM Rewell & Company, 1887, pp. 113–117, 671-676 In May 1853, he moved to Monrovia, Liberia where he attended Alexander High School. In September 1854, he returned to the United States and enrolled at Thetford Academy in Vermont, where he graduated in 1856. He then returned to Liberia where he taught school to Africans of former American slaves. He left Afr ...
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William E
William is a male given name of Germanic origin.Hanks, Hardcastle and Hodges, ''Oxford Dictionary of First Names'', Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, , p. 276. It became very popular in the English language after the Norman conquest of England in 1066,All Things William"Meaning & Origin of the Name"/ref> and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Wills, Willy, Willie, Bill, and Billy. A common Irish form is Liam. Scottish diminutives include Wull, Willie or Wullie (as in Oor Wullie or the play ''Douglas''). Female forms are Willa, Willemina, Wilma and Wilhelmina. Etymology William is related to the given name ''Wilhelm'' (cf. Proto-Germanic ᚹᛁᛚᛃᚨᚺᛖᛚᛗᚨᛉ, ''*Wiljahelmaz'' > German '' Wilhelm'' and Old Norse ᚢᛁᛚᛋᛅᚼᛅᛚᛘᛅᛋ, ''Vilhjálmr''). By regular sound changes, the native, inherited English form of the na ...
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Sherburne Wesley Burnham
Sherburne Wesley Burnham (December 12, 1838 – March 11, 1921) was an American astronomer. For more than 50 years Burnham spent all his free time observing the heavens, mainly concerning himself with binary stars. Biography Sherburne Wesley Burnham was born in Thetford, Vermont. His parents were Roswell O. Burnham and Marinda (née Foote) Burnham. He graduated from the academy in Thetford, and that was the extent of his schooling. He taught himself shorthand, and by 1858 was in New York City. Burnham was a reporter for the Union Army in New Orleans during the Civil War. While in New Orleans, he bought a copy of a popular book ''Geography of the Heavens'', which piqued his interest in astronomy. After the war, he moved to Chicago and worked as a court reporter for over 20 years. At night Burnham was an amateur astronomer, except for four years (1888–1892) he worked as a professional astronomer at Lick Observatory. He left court reporting in 1902, but remaine ...
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Thomas W
Thomas may refer to: People * List of people with given name Thomas * Thomas (name) * Thomas (surname) * Saint Thomas (other) * Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, and Doctor of the Church * Thomas the Apostle * Thomas (bishop of the East Angles) (fl. 640s–650s), medieval Bishop of the East Angles * Thomas (Archdeacon of Barnstaple) (fl. 1203), Archdeacon of Barnstaple * Thomas, Count of Perche (1195–1217), Count of Perche * Thomas (bishop of Finland) (1248), first known Bishop of Finland * Thomas, Earl of Mar (1330–1377), 14th-century Earl, Aberdeen, Scotland Geography Places in the United States * Thomas, Illinois * Thomas, Indiana * Thomas, Oklahoma * Thomas, Oregon * Thomas, South Dakota * Thomas, Virginia * Thomas, Washington * Thomas, West Virginia * Thomas County (other) * Thomas Township (other) Elsewhere * Thomas Glacier (Greenland) Arts, entertainment, and media * ''Thomas'' (Burton novel) ...
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Google Books
Google Books (previously known as Google Book Search, Google Print, and by its code-name Project Ocean) is a service from Google Inc. that searches the full text of books and magazines that Google has scanned, converted to text using optical character recognition (OCR), and stored in its digital database.The basic Google book link is found at: https://books.google.com/ . The "advanced" interface allowing more specific searches is found at: https://books.google.com/advanced_book_search Books are provided either by publishers and authors through the Google Books Partner Program, or by Google's library partners through the Library Project. Additionally, Google has partnered with a number of magazine publishers to digitize their archives. The Publisher Program was first known as Google Print when it was introduced at the Frankfurt Book Fair in October 2004. The Google Books Library Project, which scans works in the collections of library partners and adds them to the digital inve ...
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Woman's Relief Corps
The Woman's Relief Corps (WRC) is a charitable organization in the United States, originally founded as the official women's auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) in 1883. The organization was designed to assist the GAR and provide post-war relief to Union veterans. The GAR had been created as a "fraternal" organization and refused to allow women to join up until the creation of this auxiliary. It is largely dedicated to historical preservation of research and official documentation related to the WRC and GAR. Background The WRC expresses that among other tenets, a primary purpose is to perpetuate the memory of the Grand Army of the Republic, a veterans' advocacy organization for Union Army soldiers during the American Civil War. The WRC is the GAR's only legally recognized auxiliary and was organized at the specific request of the GAR. A formal Charter was drawn on July 25 and 26, 1883 in Denver, Colorado. It was subsequently incorporated by Public Act of th ...
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Bates College
Bates College () is a private liberal arts college in Lewiston, Maine. Anchored by the Historic Quad, the campus of Bates totals with a small urban campus which includes 33 Victorian Houses as some of the dormitories. It maintains of nature preserve known as the " Bates-Morse Mountain" near Campbell Island and a coastal center on Atkins Bay. With an annual enrollment of approximately 1,800 students, it is the smallest college in its athletic conference. As a result of its small student body, Bates maintains selective admit rates and little to no transfer percentages. The college was founded on March 16, 1855, by abolitionist statesman Oren Burbank Cheney and textile tycoon Benjamin Bates. Established as the Maine State Seminary, the college became the first coeducational college in New England and went on to confer the first female undergraduate degree in the area. Bates is the third-oldest college in Maine, after Bowdoin College and Colby College. It became a vanguard in ...
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