HOME



Sofia First Chronicle
The Sofia First Chronicle (Софийская первая летопись) is a Russian chronicle A chronicle ( la, chronica, from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its pop ... associated with the St. Sophia Cathedral, Novgorod Veliky Novgorod ( rus, links=yes, Великий Новгород, p=vʲɪˈlʲikʲɪj ˈnovɡərət), also known as just Novgorod (russian: Новгород, lit=newtown, links=yes), is the largest city and administrative center of Novgorod O ..., Russia Russia ( rus, link=no, Россия, Rossiya, ), or the Russian Federation, is a country spanning Eastern Europe Eastern Europe is the eastern region of . There is no consistent definition of the precise area it covers, partly because th .... Its copies exist in two versions: Early Redaction (''starshy izvod''), which ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Chronicle
A chronicle ( la, chronica, from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of ... ''chroniká'', from , ''chrónos'' – "time") is a historical account of events arranged in chronological Chronology (from Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of the Roman Republi ... order, as in a time line. Typically, equal weight is given for historically important events and local events, the purpose being the recording of events that occurred, seen from the perspective of the chronicler. A chronicle which traces world history is a universal chronicle A universal history is a work aiming at the presentation ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Saint Sophia Cathedral In Novgorod
The Cathedral of Holy Wisdom (the Holy Wisdom of God) in Veliky Novgorod Veliky Novgorod ( rus, links=yes, Великий Новгород, p=vʲɪˈlʲikʲɪj ˈnovɡərət), also known as just Novgorod (russian: Новгород, lit=newtown, links=yes), is the largest city and administrative centerAn administrati ... is the cathedral church of the Metropolitan of Novgorod and the mother church of the Novgorodian Eparchy. History The 38-metre-high, five-domed, stone cathedral was built by Vladimir of Novgorod Vladimir Yaroslavich (russian: Владимир Ярославич, Old Norse Old Norse, Old Nordic, or Old Scandinavian was a North Germanic languages, North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their Viking e ... and Bishop Luka ZhidiataLuka Zhidiata (russian: Лука́ Жидя́та) was the second bishop of Novgorod the Great (1035–1060) and saint of the Russian Orthodox Church. He replaced Efrem, who was not consecrate ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod ( rus, links=yes, Великий Новгород, p=vʲɪˈlʲikʲɪj ˈnovɡərət), also known as just Novgorod (russian: Новгород, lit=newtown, links=yes), is the largest city and administrative center of Novgorod Oblast, Russia. It is one of the oldest cities in Russia, being first mentioned in the 9th century. The city lies along the Volkhov River just downstream from its outflow from Lake Ilmen and is situated on the M10 highway (Russia), M10 federal highway connecting Moscow and Saint Petersburg. UNESCO recognized Novgorod as a World Heritage Site in 1992. The city has a population of At its peak during the 14th century, the city was the capital of the Novgorod Republic and was one of Europe's largest cities. History Early developments The Sofia First Chronicle makes initial mention of it in 859, while the Novgorod First Chronicle first mentions it in 862, when it was purportedly already a major Baltics-to-Byzantium station on the trade rout ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Russia
Russia ( rus, link=no, Россия, Rossiya, ), or the Russian Federation, is a country spanning Eastern Europe Eastern Europe is the eastern region of . There is no consistent definition of the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of , geographical, ethnic, cultural, and connotations. , located in Eastern Europe, is both the ... and Northern Asia North Asia or Northern Asia, also referred to as Siberia Siberia (; rus, Сибирь, r=Sibir', p=sʲɪˈbʲirʲ, a=Ru-Сибирь.ogg) is an extensive geographical region spanning much of Northern Asia. Siberia has been Russian conquest o .... It is the largest country in the world This is a list of the world's countries and their dependent territories by area, ranked by total area. Entries in this list include, but are not limited to, those in the ISO 3166-1 ISO 3166-1 (''Codes for the representation of names of countries ..., covering over , and encompassing one-eighth of Earth's i ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Novgorod Fourth Chronicle
The Novgorod Fourth Chronicle (Новгородская четвёртая летопись) is a Russian chronicle of 15th century. It is traditionally called "Fourth" according to the order of the modern publication of Novgorod chronicles, rather than chronologically. Together with the Sofia First Chronicle, it is believed that it is derived from a common source. Russian philologist Aleksey Shakhmatov tentatively called it the Novgorodsko-Sofiysky Svod (Novgorod-Sofia Corpus) and initially dated it by 1448, but later revised his opinion to 1430s. Some Russian philologists shared his opinion, while others attribute the common source to the 1418 Corpus of Photius, Metropolitan of Moscow. See also *Complete Collection of Russian Chronicles References

East Slavic chronicles Novgorod Republic 15th-century history books {{East-Slavic-hist-stub ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Aleksey Shakhmatov
Alexei Alexandrovich Shakhmatov (russian: Алексе́й Алекса́ндрович Ша́хматов, – 16 August 1920) was a Russian Empire, Russian Imperial philology, philologist and historian credited with laying foundations for the science of Textual criticism, textology. Shakhmatov held the title of Doctor of Russian language and philology (since 1894).Aristov, V. Aleksei Aleksandrovich Shakhmatov (ШАХМАТОВ ОЛЕКСІЙ ОЛЕКСАНДРОВИЧ)'. Encyclopedia of History of Ukraine. 2013 He was a full member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (before 1917 the Saint Petersburg Academy of Sciences) since 1899 and a chair of the Department of Russian language and philology of the Academy of Sciences (1908–1920), a member of the Constitutional Democratic Party (1905) and the Russian Empire State Council (1906–1911). Biography Born in Narva, present-day Estonia, Shakhmatov was brought up by his uncle near Saratov. He went to a public school in Moscow ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Novgorodsko-Sofiysky Svod
According to Russian philologist Aleksey Shakhmatov, Novgorodsko-Sofiysky Svod (russian: Новгородско-Софийский свод, Novgorod-Sofia Compilation) is a tentative name for a hypothetical common source for the Novgorod Fourth Chronicle and the Sofia First Chronicle. Bobrov, p. 129 Shakhmatov initially dated it by 1448 (hence it also used to be called 1448 compilation; russian: "свод 1448 г."), but later revised his opinion to 1430s. Some Russian philologists shared his opinion, while others attribute the common source to the 1418 compilation of Photius, Metropolitan of Moscow.Bobrov, p. 131 See also *Complete Collection of Russian Chronicles Notes References *Aleksandr Bobrov, "15th Century Novgorod Chronicles", Александр Григорьевич Бобров"Новгородские летописи XV века"
2001, Институт русской литературы (Пушкинский дом) East Slavic chronicles Novgorod Repub ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Photius, Metropolitan Of Moscow
Photius of Kiev (Russian language, Russian: ''Фотий Киевский'') (died July 2 or February 7, 1431), Metropolitan of Kiev and all Rus', Metropolitan of Moscow and all Russia, of Greeks, Greek descent. Life In 1407, Photius was appointed Metropolitan of all Russia with the title of Metropolitan of Kiev and Vladimir, Russia, Vladimir. In 1408, he was transferred to Moscow and became Metropolitan of Moscow and all Russia. In Moscow, however, Photius had to deal with a lot of adversities, such as drought, starvation, Infectious disease, pestilence and fires, which had fallen upon Russia. Photius found his metropolitan residence ravaged and ecclesiastic treasury empty. Everything seemed to be in chaos and he didn't know a single word of Russian. See also * Large Sakkos of Photius References

{{DEFAULTSORT:Photius, , Metropolitan Of Moscow Metropolitans and Patriarchs of Moscow Metropolitans of Kiev and all Rus' 1431 deaths Year of birth unknown Russian people of G ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Academic Chronicle
The Academic Chronicle (russian: Московско-Академическая летопись, translit=Moskovskaya akademicheskaya letopis) or Suzdal' Chronicle (russian: Суздальская летопись, translit=Suzdalskaya Letopis) is a late 15th-century compilation of other Russian-language chronicles. The chronicle was probably compiled in Rostov based on the Primary Chronicle, Radziwiłł Chronicle (events before 1206), Sofia First Chronicle (events 1205–1238), and Rostov collection (events 1238–1418). The chronicle was published in full in the Complete Collection of Russian Chronicles in 1927. The only surviving original is preserved in the Russian State Library. It is an important source for Russian history of the preceding centuries, and is currently being discussed for its importance for early Russian literature. Notes References

East Slavic chronicles 15th-century history books Russian non-fiction books {{Russia-hist-book-stub ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Sofia Second Chronicle
The Sofia Second Chronicle is a Russian chronicle from the 16th century. It is found in two redactions: The Archival redaction, from the first quarter of the 16th century and now in the Russian State Archive of Ancient Documents (RGADA) (Fond 181, No. 371); and the Voskresenskii (''Resurrection'') Redaction from the middle of the 16th century, now housed in the State Historical Museum (GIM) on the north end of Red Square (Voskresenskoe Sobranie, bumazhnoe, No. 154). It was first published at the beginning of the 19th century and is included in the Complete Collection of Russian Chronicles (PSRL, vol. 6; St. Petersburg, 1851). The Sofia Second Chronicle is thought to have derived from the Lvov Chronicle with which it shares many similarities.See entry on Sofia Second Chronicle in Ia. S. Lur'e, ed., ''Slovar' Knizhnikov i knizhnosti drevnei Rusi,'' available online at http://lib.pushkinskijdom.ru/Default.aspx?tabid=4296 See also *Sofia First Chronicle References

East Slavic ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



East Slavic Chronicles
Rus' letopises ('' orv, Рѹсьскъе лѣтописи''; ) or Rus’ Letopisi are the main type of Old Rus historical literature. Composed from 11th to 18th centuries the letopises are one of the leading genres Old East Slavic literature and among the most extensive monuments to it.Lurye, Yakov. Letopisi // Literature of Old Rus'. Biographical and Bibliographical Dictionary / ed. by Oleg Tvorogov. - Moscow: Prosvescheniye ("Enlightenment"), 1996. (russianЛурье Я.С. Летописи// Литература Древней Руси. Биобиблиографический словарь / под ред. О.В. Творогова. - М.: Просвещение, 1996). Letopises were the main form of historical narrative until the middle of the 16th century, the time of Ivan the Terrible Ivan IV Vasilyevich (russian: Ива́н Васильевич; 25 August 1530 – ), commonly known in English language, English as Ivan the Terrible (from , Romanization of Russi ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Novgorod Republic
The Novgorod Republic (russian: Новгородская республика, Novgorodskaya respublika, ; orv, Новгородскаѧ землѧ, Novgorodskaę zemlę, lit=Novgorodian Land; la, Novogardia or russian: Новгородская Русь, Novgorodskaya Rus', lit=Novgorodian Rus') was a medieval Rus' state from the 12th to 15th centuries, stretching from the Gulf of Finland The Gulf of Finland ( fi, Suomenlahti; et, Soome laht; rus, Фи́нский зали́в, r=Finskiy zaliv, p=ˈfʲinskʲɪj zɐˈlʲif; sv, Finska viken) is the easternmost arm of the Baltic Sea. It extends between Finland to the north and E ... in the west to the northern Ural Mountains The Ural Mountains (; rus, Ура́льские го́ры, r=Uralskiye gory, p=ʊˈralʲskʲɪjə ˈgorɨ; ba, Урал тауҙары, ''Ural tauźarı'') or simply the Urals, are a mountain range that runs approximately from north to south ... in the east, including the city of Novgorod V ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]