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Scheveningen
Scheveningen is one of the eight districts of The Hague, Netherlands, as well as a subdistrict (''wijk'') of that city. Scheveningen is a modern seaside resort with a long, sandy beach, an esplanade, a pier, and a lighthouse. The beach is popular for water sports such as windsurfing and kiteboarding. The harbour is used for both fishing and tourism. History The earliest reference to the name ''Sceveninghe'' goes back to around 1280. The first inhabitants may have been Anglo-Saxons. Other historians favour a Scandinavian origin. Fishing was the main source of food and income. The Battle of Scheveningen was fought between English and Dutch fleets off the coast of the village on 10 August 1653. Thousands of people gathered on the shore to watch. Montagu's flagship picked up the English king at Scheveningen in order to accomplish the Restoration. A road to neighbouring The Hague was constructed in 1663 (current name: Scheveningseweg). In 1470, a heavy storm destroyed ...
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The Hague
The Hague ( ; nl, Den Haag or ) is a city and municipality of the Netherlands, situated on the west coast facing the North Sea. The Hague is the country's administrative centre and its seat of government, and while the official capital of the Netherlands is Amsterdam, The Hague has been described as the country's de facto capital. The Hague is also the capital of the province of South Holland, and the city hosts both the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court. With a population of over half a million, it is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The Hague is the core municipality of the Greater The Hague urban area, which comprises the city itself and its suburban municipalities, containing over 800,000 people, making it the third-largest urban area in the Netherlands, again after the urban areas of Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The Rotterdam–The Hague metropolitan area, with a population of approximately 2.6&n ...
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Scheveningen Pier
The Scheveningen Pier is a pleasure pier in the Dutch resort town of Scheveningen near The Hague. Opened in 1959, the current pier is the second in the town, the first being lost just after, and as a result of, the Second World War. History Wandelhoofd Koningin Wilhelmina The first pier of Scheveningen, named Wandelhoofd Koningin Wilhelmina (''Stroll Main Queen Wilhelmina'') opened on 6 May 1901 and was designed by the Dutch architect Wilhelmus Bernardus van Liefland and W. Wyhowski. The wooden structure was built on a steel foundation directly in front of the Kurhaus hotel. During the Second World War Scheveningen was part of the Atlantikwall with the Germans using the pavilion as a storage facility as well as placing arms ammunition on the pier. To complicate an invasion by the Allies, the 30 meter promenade was removed and fitted with a suspension bridge. On March 26, 1943 the pavilion burned out completely. After the fire, the Germans demolished the pier by removing the wo ...
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Battle Of Scheveningen
The Battle of Scheveningen (also known as the Battle of Ter Heijde) was the final naval battle of the First Anglo-Dutch War. It took place on 31 July 1653 (10 August on the Gregorian calendar), between the fleets of the Commonwealth of England and the United Provinces. The Dutch fleet suffered massive losses but achieved its immediate strategic goal of raising the Royal Navy blockade of the Dutch coast. Background After their victory at the Battle of the Gabbard in June 1653, the English fleet of 120 ships under General at Sea George Monck on his flagship ''Resolution'' blockaded the Dutch coast, capturing many merchant vessels.The Battle of Scheveningen, 31 July 1653
Royal Museums Greenwich. The Dutch economy began to collapse, with mass unemployment and a severe economic downturn affecting it. On 24 ...
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Kurhaus (Scheveningen)
The Kurhaus of Scheveningen, The Hague in the Netherlands is a hotel which has been called the Grand Hotel Amrâth Kurhaus The Hague since October 2014. It is located in the main seaside resort area, near the beach. History The Kurhaus was built between 1884 and 1885 by the German architects Johann Friedrich Henkenhaf and Friedrich Ebert. It consisted originally of a concert hall and a hotel with 120 rooms. Having suffered serious damage by fire, it was rebuilt between 1886 and 1887. The ceilings were painted by the Brussels artist Van Hoeck and his large workshop. Several kings and heads of state sojourned in the Kurhaus during its heyday. Until the mid 1960s, the Kurhaus remained a public attraction as a major concert hall, at which many top artists performed. The Rolling Stones performed at the Kurhaus on August 8, 1964, and had to flee the building due to the vast numbers of excited fans outside. Ike & Tina Turner performed at the Kurhaus on February 11, 1971. The show w ...
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Kurhaus Of Scheveningen
The Kurhaus of Scheveningen, The Hague in the Netherlands is a hotel which has been called the Grand Hotel Amrâth Kurhaus The Hague since October 2014. It is located in the main seaside resort area, near the beach. History The Kurhaus was built between 1884 and 1885 by the German architects Johann Friedrich Henkenhaf and Friedrich Ebert. It consisted originally of a concert hall and a hotel with 120 rooms. Having suffered serious damage by fire, it was rebuilt between 1886 and 1887. The ceilings were painted by the Brussels artist Van Hoeck and his large workshop. Several kings and heads of state sojourned in the Kurhaus during its heyday. Until the mid 1960s, the Kurhaus remained a public attraction as a major concert hall, at which many top artists performed. The Rolling Stones performed at the Kurhaus on August 8, 1964, and had to flee the building due to the vast numbers of excited fans outside. Ike & Tina Turner performed at the Kurhaus on February 11, 1971. The show w ...
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Districts Of The Hague
The city of The Hague, Netherlands ) , anthem = ( en, "William of Nassau") , image_map = , map_caption = , subdivision_type = Sovereign state , subdivision_name = Kingdom of the Netherlands , established_title = Before independence , established_date = Spanish Neth ..., consists of eight districts ('' stadsdelen'', singular ''stadsdeel''). Each district is divided into subdistricts (''wijken''). Each of these stadsdelen has its own district office (''stadsdeelkantoor''), where most of the local government activity is organised. These stadsdeelkantoren make many aspects of local government more accessible to residents. The current division of The Hague into individual ''stadsdelen'' was created in 1988 by the main city government. This division of The Hague into ''wijken'' and ''buurten'' (neighbourhoods) deviates from the 1953 divisions that had been known to many residents. List of districts Notes References {{Reflist Geography of The Hague ...
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Seaside Resort
A seaside resort is a town, village, or hotel that serves as a vacation resort and is located on a coast. Sometimes the concept includes an aspect of official accreditation based on the satisfaction of certain requirements, such as in the German ''Seebad''. Where a beach is the primary focus for tourists, it may be called a beach resort. History Seaside resorts have existed since antiquity. In Roman times, the town of Baiae, by the Tyrrhenian Sea in Italy, was a resort for those who were sufficiently prosperous. Barcola in northern Italy, with its Roman luxury villas, is considered a special example of ancient leisure culture by the sea. Mersea Island, in Essex, England was a seaside holiday destination for wealthy Romans living in Colchester. The development of the beach as a popular leisure resort from the mid-19th century was the first manifestation of what is now the global tourist industry. The first seaside resorts were opened in the 18th century for the aristocracy, who ...
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Restoration (England)
The Restoration of the Stuart monarchy in the kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland took place in 1660 when King Charles II returned from exile in continental Europe. The preceding period of the Protectorate and the civil wars came to be known as the Interregnum (1649–1660). The term ''Restoration'' is also used to describe the period of several years after, in which a new political settlement was established. It is very often used to cover the whole reign of King Charles II (1660–1685) and often the brief reign of his younger brother King James II (1685–1688). In certain contexts it may be used to cover the whole period of the later Stuart monarchs as far as the death of Queen Anne and the accession of the Hanoverian King George I in 1714. For example, Restoration comedy typically encompasses works written as late as 1710. The Protectorate After Richard Cromwell, Lord Protector from 1658 to 1659, ceded power to the Rump Parliament, Charles Fleetwood and Jo ...
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Pier
Seaside pleasure pier in Brighton, England. The first seaside piers were built in England in the early 19th century.">England.html" ;"title="Brighton, England">Brighton, England. The first seaside piers were built in England in the early 19th century. A pier is a raised structure that rises above a body of water and usually juts out from its shore, typically supported by piling, piles or column, pillars, and provides above-water access to offshore areas. Frequent pier uses include fishing, [ oat docking and access for both passengers and cargo, and oceanside recreation. Bridges, buildings, and walkways may all be supported by architectural piers. Their open structure allows tides and currents to flow relatively unhindered, whereas the more solid foundations of a quay or the closely spaced piles of a wharf can act as a breakwater, and are consequently more liable to silting. Piers can range in size and complexity from a simple lightweight wooden structure to major structure ...
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Lighthouse
A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of physical structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and to serve as a beacon for navigational aid, for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways. Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, rocks, and safe entries to harbors; they also assist in aerial navigation. Once widely used, the number of operational lighthouses has declined due to the expense of maintenance and has become uneconomical since the advent of much cheaper, more sophisticated and effective electronic navigational systems. History Ancient lighthouses Before the development of clearly defined ports, mariners were guided by fires built on hilltops. Since elevating the fire would improve the visibility, placing the fire on a platform became a practice that led to the development of the lighthouse. In antiquity, the lighthouse functioned more as an entrance marker to ports than as a warning signal for reefs an ...
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Historian
A historian is a person who studies and writes about the past and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. Some historians are recognized by publications or training and experience.Herman, A. M. (1998). Occupational outlook handbook: 1998–99 edition. Indianapolis: JIST Works. Page 525. "Historian" became a professional occupation in the late nineteenth century as research universities were emerging in Germany and elsewhere. Objectivity During the '' Irving v Penguin Books and Lipstadt'' trial, people became aware that the court needed to identify what was an "objective historian" in the same vein as the reasonable person, and reminiscent of the standard traditionally used in English law of "the man on the Clapham omnibus". This was necessary so that there would be a legal benchmark to compare and contrast the schola ...
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