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Roman Numerals
Roman numerals are a that originated in and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the . Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the . Modern style uses seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value: The use of Roman numerals continued long after the decline of the . From the 14th century on, Roman numerals began to be replaced by ; however, this process was gradual, and the use of Roman numerals persists in some applications to this day. One place they are often seen is on s. For instance, on the clock of (designed in 1852), the hours from 1 to 12 are written as: The notations and can be read as "one less than five" (4) and "one less than ten" (9), although there is a tradition favouring representation of "4" as "" on Roman numeral clocks. Other common uses include year numbers on monuments and buildings and copyright dates on the title screens of movies and television programs. , signifying "a thousand ...
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Large Numbers
Numbers that are significantly larger than those typically used in everyday life, for instance in simple counting or in monetary transactions, appear frequently in fields such as mathematics, physical cosmology, cosmology, cryptography, and statistical mechanics. The term typically refers to large positive integers, or more generally, large positive real numbers, but it may also be used in other contexts. The study of nomenclature and properties of large numbers is sometimes called googology. Sometimes, people refer to large numbers as being "astronomically large;" however, it is easy to mathematically define numbers that are much larger even than those used in astronomy. In the everyday world Scientific notation was created to handle the wide range of values that occur in scientific study. 1.0 × 109, for example, means one 1000000000 (number), billion, or a 1 followed by nine zeros: 1 000 000 000. The Multiplicative inverse, reciprocal, 1.0 × 10−9, means o ...
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Oxford Classical Dictionary
The ''Oxford Classical Dictionary'' (''OCD'') is generally considered "the best one-volume dictionary on antiquity," an encyclopedic work in English consisting of articles relating to classical antiquity Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history History (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, ... and its civilizations. It was first published in 1949 (''OCD''1 or ''OCD''), edited by Max Cary with the assistance of H. J. Rose Herbert Jennings Rose FBA (5 May 1883, in Orillia Orillia is a city in Ontario , Label_map = yes , image_map = Ontario in Canada 2.svg , map_alt = Map showing Ontario's location east/central of ..., H. P. Harvey, and Alexander Souter Alexander Souter, Fellow of the British Academy, FBA (14 August 1873 – 17 January 1949) was a Scotland, Scottish bi ...
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Saint Louis Art Museum
The Saint Louis Art Museum is one of the principal Principal may refer to: Title or rank * Principal (academia) The principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher ... U.S. art museum An art museum is a building or space for the display of art, usually from the museum's own Collection (artwork), collection. It might be in public or private ownership and may be accessible to all or have restrictions in place. Although primar ...s, with paintings Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a solid surface (called the "matrix" or "support"). The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush, but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and ai ..., sculptures Sculpture is the branch of the visual arts that operates in three dimensions. It is one of the plastic arts. Durable sculptural pr ...
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Admiralty Arch
Admiralty Arch is a landmark building in London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a estuary down to the North Sea, and has b ... providing road and pedestrian access between The Mall, which extends to the southwest, and Trafalgar Square Trafalgar Square ( ) is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, established in the early 19th century around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. The Square's name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, the Royal Navy, ... to the northeast. Admiralty Arch, commissioned by King Edward VII Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland There have been 12 British monarchs since the political union of the Kingdom of England The Kingdom of Engla ... in memory ...
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Piety
Piety is a virtue Virtue ( la, virtus ''Virtus'' () was a specific virtue in Ancient Rome. It carries connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin ''vir'', "man"). It was thus a fr ... which may include religious devotion or spirituality The meaning of spirituality has developed and expanded over time, and various connotations can be found alongside each other. Traditionally, spirituality referred to a Religion, religious process of re-formation which "aims to recover the origin .... A common element in most conceptions of piety is a duty of respect. In a religious context piety may be expressed through pious activities or devotions, which may vary among countries and cultures. Etymology The word piety comes from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area a ...
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Jupiter (mythology)
Jupiter ( la, Iūpiter or , from Proto-Italic The Proto-Italic language is the ancestor of the Italic languages The Italic languages form a branch of the Indo-European The Indo-European languages are a language family A language is a structured system of communication used by ... "day, sky" + "father", thus " sky father"), also known as Jove ( gen. ''Iovis'' ), is the god of the sky The sky The sky (also sometimes called celestial dome) is everything that lies above the surface of the Earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life. About 29% of Earth's surf ... and thunder Thunder is the sound caused by lightning Lightning is a naturally occurring electrostatic discharge during which two electrically charged regions in the atmosphere or ground temporarily equalize themselves, causing the instantaneous r ... and king of the gods in ancient Roman religion Religion in ...
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Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov (; 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. During his lifetime, Asimov was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke. A prolific writer, he wrote or edited more than 500 books. He also wrote an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. Best known for his hard science fiction, Asimov also wrote mystery fiction, mysteries and fantasy, as well as much nonfiction. Asimov's most famous work is the ''Foundation series, Foundation'' series, the first three books of which won the one-time Hugo Award for "Best All-Time Series" in 1966. His other major series are the ''Galactic Empire (series), Galactic Empire'' series and the Robot series, ''Robot'' series. The ''Galactic Empire'' novels are set in the much earlier history of the same fictional universe as the ''Foundation'' series. Later, with ''Foundation and Earth'' (1986), he linked this distant ...
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Palace Of Westminster
The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place for both the House of Commons The House of Commons is the name for the elected lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refer to: Places Canada: *Chambers Township, Ontario United States: *Chambers County, Alabama *Chambers, Arizona, an unincorporat ... and the House of Lords The House of Lords, formally The Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the of the . Membership is by , or . Like the , it meets in the . ar ..., the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom The Parliament of the United Kingdom is the of the , the and the . It alone possesses and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and the overseas territories. Parliament is but has three parts, consisting of the .... Informally known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, t ...
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Wells Cathedral Clock
The Wells Cathedral clock is an astronomical clock An astronomical clock, horologium, or orloj is a clock A clock is a device used to measure, verify, keep, and indicate time. The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to measure intervals of time shorter than the ... in the north transept A transept (with two semitransepts) is a transverse part of any building, which lies across the main body of the edifice."Transept", ProbertEncyclopaedia.comPE-tran In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave The nave () ... of Wells Cathedral Wells Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Wells, Somerset, England, dedicated to St Andrew the Apostle and seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells, whose ''cathedra'' it holds as mother church of the Diocese of Bath and Wells. Built before 909 ..., England. The clock is one of the group of famous 14th to 16th century astronomical clocks to be found in the West of England. The surviving m ...
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Colosseum
The Colosseum ( ; it, Colosseo ) is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy, just east of the Roman Forum. It is the largest ancient amphitheatre ever built, and is still the largest standing amphitheatre in the world today, despite its age. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian () in 72 and was completed in 80 AD under his successor and heir, Titus (). Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (). The three emperors that were patrons of the work are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named the Flavian Amphitheatre ( la, Amphitheatrum Flavium; it, Anfiteatro Flavio ) by later classicists and archaeologists for its association with their family name ''(Flavia (gens), Flavius)''. The Colosseum is built of travertine#Uses, travertine limestone, tuff (volcanic rock), and brick-faced Roman concrete, concrete. The Colosseum could hold an estimated 50,000 to 80,000 spectators at various points in its history having ...
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