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President Of The Legislative Council Of Hong Kong
The president of the Legislative Council is the presiding officer of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. According to the Article 71 of the Hong Kong Basic Law, the president of the Legislative Council is elected by and from among Legislative Council members, plays the presiding role, administrative role and ceremonial role, and ensures the smooth conduct of the Legislative Council meetings. History From the establishment of the council in 1843 to 1993, the president of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong was the governor. In 1991, a deputy president, John Joseph Swaine, was appointed by the governor from among the non-official members to chair the sittings. The governor remained president and member, but systematically absented himself from most of the sittings. In February 1993, the governor ceased to be member and president of the council. The presidency was handed over to a member elected from among the unofficial members. Eligibility Under the current system, the p ...
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Andrew Leung
Andrew Leung Kwan-yuen (; born 24 February 1951) is a Hong Kong politician who is the current President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (Legco), representing the Industrial (First) functional constituency. From October 2012 to October 2016, he was the chairman of Business and Professionals Alliance for Hong Kong (BPA), the second largest party in the legislature. Early life and education Leung was born on 24 February 1951 to a family who run a textile factory, the Sun Hing knitting company. He was educated in the University of Leeds and joined his father's family business. In 1970, he set up the Sun Hing Knitting Factory in Kwai Chung and became the chairman of the company. Public service career Leung joined the Hong Kong Woollen & Synthetic Knitting Manufacturers' Association, the chamber of commerce of the manufacturing companies, in which he later became the honorary president in 1997. He has been the chairman and Honorary Chairman of the Textile Council of Hong K ...
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Governor Of Hong Kong
The governor of Hong Kong was the representative of the British Crown in Hong Kong from 1843 to 1997. In this capacity, the governor was president of the Executive Council and commander-in-chief of the British Forces Overseas Hong Kong. The governor's roles were defined in the Hong Kong Letters Patent and Royal Instructions. Upon the end of British rule and the handover of Hong Kong to China in 1997, most of the civil functions of this office went to the chief executive of Hong Kong, and military functions went to the commander of the People's Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison. The governor Authorities and duties of the governor were defined in the Hong Kong Letters Patent and Royal Instructions in 1843. The governor, appointed by the British monarch (on the advice of the Foreign Secretary), exercised the executive branch of the government of Hong Kong throughout British sovereignty and, with the exception of a brief experiment after World War II, no seriou ...
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Election Committee (constituency)
The Election Committee constituency (ECC; ) is a constituency in the elections for the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. It was first created in 1995, re-created with a different composition in 1998 until it was abolished in 2004, and created for the third time in the 2021 electoral overhaul. It is the single largest constituency, taking 40 out of the 90 seats in the Legislative Council. The Election Committee constituency was one of the three sectors designed in the Basic Law of Hong Kong next to the directly elected geographical constituencies and the indirectly elected functional constituencies in the early SAR period. With the last British Governor Chris Patten's electoral reform, the ECC was composed of all elected District Board members who had been elected in 1994. The Single Transferable Vote system was used in the 1995 election. After the handover of Hong Kong, the ECC was allocated 10 seats out of the total 60 seats in the SAR Legislative Council, comprising al ...
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1998 President Of The Hong Kong Legislative Council Election
The election for the President of the First Legislative Council took place on 2 July 1998 for members of the 1st Legislative Council of Hong Kong to among themselves elect the President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong for the duration of the council. Rita Fan from the pro-Beijing camp, who presided over the provisional legislature, defeated pre-handover President Andrew Wong. Proceedings According to Article 71 of the Hong Kong Basic Law and Rule 4 of the Rules of Procedure of the Legislative Council, the President of the Legislative Council has to be a Chinese citizen of 40 years old or above, a permanent resident of Hong Kong with no right of abode in any foreign country, and has ordinarily resided in Hong Kong for not less than 20 years continuously. Following the taking of oath of office, members of the Council proceeded to elect a member to preside over the election of the President. Pan-democracy Yeung Sum (Dem) orally nominated pro-business Edward Leong ( Brea ...
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Pro-Beijing Camp
The pro-Beijing camp, pro-establishment camp, pro-government camp or pro-China camp refers to a political alignment in Hong Kong which generally supports the policies of the Beijing central government and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) towards Hong Kong. The term "pro-establishment camp" is regularly in use to label the broader segment of the Hong Kong political arena which has the closer relationship with the establishment, namely the governments of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). It is also labeled as the "Patriotic Front" by the pro-Beijing media and sometimes labeled as "loyalists" by the rival pro-democracy camp. The pro-Beijing camp evolved from Hong Kong's pro-CCP faction, often called "leftists", which acted under the direction of the CCP. It launched the 1967 Hong Kong riots against British colonial rule in Hong Kong and had a long rivalry with the pro-Kuomintang bloc. After the Sino-British Joint De ...
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Nonpartisan
Nonpartisanism is a lack of affiliation with, and a lack of bias towards, a political party. While an Oxford English Dictionary definition of ''partisan'' includes adherents of a party, cause, person, etc., in most cases, nonpartisan refers specifically to political party connections rather than being the strict antonym of "partisan". Canada In Canada, the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories and the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut are the only bodies at the provincial/territorial level that are currently nonpartisan; they operate on a consensus government system. The autonomous Nunatsiavut Assembly operates similarly on a sub-provincial level. India In India, the Jaago Re! One Billion Votes campaign was a non-partisan campaign initiated by Tata Tea, and Janaagraha to encourage citizens to vote in the 2009 Indian general election. The campaign was a non-partisan campaign initiated by Anal Saha. Philippines In the Philippines, barangay elections (election ...
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1997 President Of The Hong Kong Provisional Legislative Council Election
The election for the President of the Provisional Legislative Council took place on 25 January 1997 for members of the Provisional Legislative Council of Hong Kong to among themselves elect the President for the duration of the council. Rita Fan from the pro-Beijing camp defeated President of the colonial Legislative Council Andrew Wong and was elected. Election The election of the President through secret ballot was held during the first-ever meeting of the Provisional Legislative Council (PLC). The PLC was forced to meet in Shenzhen to remain outside the reach of Hong Kong law, as democracy groups called it illegal and threatened to take the PLC to court if its members try to gather in Hong Kong. The meeting was closed to the public, and journalists watched the proceedings on closed-circuit television. Rita Fan, a key player in committees overseeing the handover with solid connections with women's groups and Beijing, beat the current Legislative Council president, Andrew Won ...
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Rita Fan
Rita Fan Hsu Lai-tai (; ' Hsu; ''born'' Hsu Ching-li; born 20 September 1945) is a senior Hong Kong politician. She was the first President of the Hong Kong SAR Legislative Council from 1998 to 2008 and a member of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress (NPCSC). First stepping into politics when she was appointed to the colonial Legislative Council in 1983, she rose to the Executive Council in 1989 until she resigned from the colonial services in 1992. She developed a close relationship with the Beijing authorities subsequently, assuming the office of the President of the Beijing-installed Provisional Legislative Council on the eve of the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong. She continued her position as the President of the SAR Legislative Council and first contested in the geographical constituency direct election in Hong Kong Island in 2004. Shortly before retiring from the Legislative Council in 2008, Fan became the member of the Standing Committee ...
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1995 Hong Kong Legislative Election
The 1995 Hong Kong Legislative Council election for members of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo) was held on 17 September 1995. It was the first, and only, fully elected legislative election in the colonial period before transferring Hong Kong's sovereignty to China two years later. The elections returned 20 members from directly elected geographical constituencies, 30 members from indirectly elected functional constituencies, and 10 members from elections committee constituency who were elected by all District Board members. In consequence of Governor Chris Patten's constitutional reforms, which were strongly opposed by the Beijing government, the nine newly created functional constituencies enfranchised around 2.7 million new voters. As the tensions between Britain and China went on, Hong Kong became rapidly politicised. Party politics was getting in shape as the Beijing-loyalist Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB), the pro-business Li ...
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New Territories South-east (constituency)
The New Territories East geographical constituency was the one of the five geographical constituencies in the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. It was established in 1998 for the first SAR Legislative Council election and was abolished under the 2021 overhaul of the Hong Kong electoral system. It encompassed Sha Tin District, Tai Po District, North District and Sai Kung District. In the 2016 Legislative Council election, nine members of the Legislative Council using the Hare quota of party-list proportional representation with 1,139,616 electorates in 2020. History The single-constituency single-vote system was replaced by the party-list proportional representation system for the first SAR Legislative Council election designed by Beijing to reward the weaker pro-Beijing candidates and dilute the electoral strength of the majority pro-democrats. Five seats were allocated to New Territories East, where popular democrat legislator Emily Lau of The Frontier topped the poll b ...
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1995 President Of The Hong Kong Legislative Council Election
An election for the President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong took place on 11 October 1995 for members to among themselves elect the new President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong, President. Andrew Wong (politician), Andrew Wong was unopposed and took up the presidency until the handover of Hong Kong in 1997. Election Andrew Wong (politician), Andrew Wong, independent, received the support of the largest faction in the council, the Democratic Party (Hong Kong), Democratic Party, and some other independents. The rival Liberal Party (Hong Kong), Liberal Party and some other independents were said to have lobbied the former Secretary for Health and Welfare, Elizabeth Wong Chien Chi-lien, to compete for the presidency. Wong, however, preferred to run for the chairmanship of the powerful finance committee. At the end, the Clerk to the council received only one valid nomination for the office of President. Andrew Wong was proposed by Martin Lee, chairman of Democrati ...
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Andrew Wong (politician)
Andrew Wong Wang-fat (; born 11 December 1943) is a Hong-Kong politician who was the last president of the Legislative Council during British rule. He was the only person of Chinese ethnicity to have served in the position during British rule, supported by the pan-democracy camp. Andrew Wong was born in Shanghai, Republic of China. He attended Wah Yan College, an all-male Jesuit secondary school in Hong Kong, after which studied at the University of Hong Kong, Syracuse University in the United States and completed an MPhil at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in the United Kingdom. Wong is often referred to by the nickname "Uncle Fat" (). First elected into the Legislative Council of Hong Kong in 1985, Wong was elected by his fellow members of the Council to the position of its president in 1995. He held the position until 30 June 1997, when the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China ...
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