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Order Of Precedence In Northern Ireland
An ''unofficial'' order of precedence in Northern Ireland, according to ''Burke's Peerage''106th Edition this is not officially authorised by or published with authority (''cum privilegio'') from either Buckingham Palace (the Royal Household) or the College of Arms, or the Home Office, the Ministry of Justice or the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) of Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, or the Northern Ireland Assembly, or the Northern Ireland Executive. History The first official "Scale of Local Precedence for Northern Ireland" was made by royal warrant of George V on 30 January 1923 transmitted James Hamilton, 3rd Duke of Abercorn, who was Governor of Northern Ireland. The Governor ranked next in the scale after the Sovereign. The 1923 scale replaced the order of precedence in Ireland consequent on the partition of Ireland and abolition of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, whose functions the Governor carried out in Northern Ireland. The 1923 scale was drawn up b ...
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Order Of Precedence
An order of precedence is a sequential hierarchy of nominal importance and can be applied to individuals, groups, or organizations. Most often it is used in the context of people by many organizations and governments, for very formal and state occasions, especially where diplomats are present. It can also be used in the context of decorations, medals and awards. Historically, the order of precedence had a more widespread use, especially in court and aristocratic life. A person's position in an order of precedence is not necessarily an indication of functional importance, but rather an indication of ceremonial or historical relevance; for instance, it may dictate where dignitaries are seated at formal dinners. The term is occasionally used to mean the order of succession—to determine who replaces the head of state in the event they are removed from office or incapacitated—as they are often identical, at least near the top. What follows are the general orders of preceden ...
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Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (), or more formally Lieutenant General and General Governor of Ireland, was the title of the chief governor of Ireland from the Williamite Wars of 1690 until the Partition of Ireland in 1922. This spanned the Kingdom of Ireland (1541–1800) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1922). The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the Viceroy, and his wife was known as the vicereine. The government of Ireland in practice was usually in the hands of the Lord Deputy up to the 17th century, and later of the Chief Secretary for Ireland. Role The Lord Lieutenant possessed a number of overlapping roles. He was * the representative of the King (the "viceroy"); * the head of the executive in Ireland; * (on occasion) a member of the English or British Cabinet; * the fount of mercy, justice and patronage; * (on occasion) commander-in-chief in Ireland. * Grand Master of the Order of St. Patrick Prior to the ...
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List Of Shrievalties
This is a list of the present unpaid ceremonial offices of High Sheriffs in England and Wales and in Northern Ireland, along with the more localised but equivalent Sheriffdoms of 16 towns/cities. Historically a High Sheriff was appointed to each of the historic counties of England and Wales and those of Ireland. The Sheriffs Act 1887 sets out the appointments and qualifications of sheriffs in England and Wales. The shrievalties were subsequently redefined in terms of the new administrative counties established by the Local Government Act 1888 and Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. These were abolished in England and Wales in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972, with shrievalties since then being defined in terms of the new local government areas created by that Act. As the structure of local government has changed since the introduction of unitary authorities from the 1990s onwards, the shrievalties in England and Wales are now defined as groups of local authorities, or parts ...
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Counties Of Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland is divided into six counties, namely: Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry and Tyrone. Six largely rural administrative counties based on these were among the eight primary local government areas of Northern Ireland from its 1921 creation until 1973. The other two local government areas were the urban county boroughs of Derry (geographically part of the County of Londonderry) and Belfast (geographically split between the counties of Antrim and Down). The six counties date from the Kingdom of Ireland; five were created between 1570 and 1591 in the Tudor conquest of Ireland, while county Londonderry dates from 1613 and the Plantation of Ulster. The total number of counties in the island of Ireland is 32, with Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland often respectively called "the Six Counties" and "the Twenty-Six Counties", especially by Irish nationalists opposed to the partition of Ireland. The 1898–1973 administrative counties were sub ...
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List Of Lord Lieutenants In The United Kingdom
Lord-lieutenants are appointed in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Lord-lieutenants See also *Lord Lieutenant * Deputy Lieutenant *Ceremonial counties of England *Lieutenancy areas of Scotland *Preserved counties of Wales The preserved counties of Wales are the eight current areas used in Wales for the ceremonial purposes of lieutenancy and shrievalty. They are based on the counties created by the Local Government Act 1972 and used for local government and othe ... * Lists of Lord Lieutenancies * List of French prefects Notes External linksList of Lord Lieutenants provided by the Ministry of Justice response to a Freedom of Information Act request {{DEFAULTSORT:List Of Lord Lieutenants Of The United Kingdom *01 Lord Lieutenants * * * * ...
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Lord Lieutenant
A lord-lieutenant ( ) is the British monarch's personal representative in each lieutenancy area of the United Kingdom. Historically, each lieutenant was responsible for organising the county's militia. In 1871, the lieutenant's responsibility over the local militia was removed. However, it was not until 1921 that they formally lost the right to call upon able-bodied men to fight when needed. Lord-lieutenant is now an honorary titular position usually awarded to a retired notable person in the county. Origins England and Wales Lieutenants were first appointed to a number of English counties by King Henry VIII in the 1540s, when the military functions of the sheriffs were handed over to them. Each lieutenant raised and was responsible for the efficiency of the local militia units of his county, and afterwards of the yeomanry and volunteers. He was commander of these forces, whose officers he appointed. These commissions were originally of temporary duration, and only when ...
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Orders Of Precedence In The United Kingdom
The order of precedence in the United Kingdom is the sequential hierarchy for Peers of the Realm, officers of state, senior members of the clergy, holders of the various Orders of Chivalry and other persons in the three legal jurisdictions within the United Kingdom: * England and Wales * Scotland * Northern Ireland Separate orders exist for males and females. Determination of precedence The order of precedence is determined by various methods. The Precedence Act (which technically applies only to determine seating in the House of Lords Chamber) and the Acts of Union with Scotland and Ireland generally set precedence for members of the nobility. The statutes of the various Orders of Chivalry set precedence for their members. In other cases, precedence may be decided by the sovereign's order, by a Royal Warrant of Precedence, by letters patent, by Acts of Parliament, or by custom. Source of precedence One may acquire precedence for various reasons. Firstly, one may be an office-h ...
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Charles III
Charles III (Charles Philip Arthur George; born 14 November 1948) is King of the United Kingdom and the 14 other Commonwealth realms. He was the longest-serving heir apparent and Prince of Wales and, at age 73, became the oldest person to accede to the British throne following the death of his mother, Elizabeth II, on 8 September 2022. Charles was born in Buckingham Palace during the reign of his maternal grandfather, King George VI, and was three when his mother ascended the throne in 1952, making him the heir apparent. He was made Prince of Wales in 1958 and his investiture was held in 1969. He was educated at Cheam and Gordonstoun schools, as was his father, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Charles later spent six months at the Timbertop campus of Geelong Grammar School in Victoria, Australia. After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Cambridge, Charles served in the Air Force and Navy from 1971 to 1976. In 1981, he married Lady Dia ...
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Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973
The Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which received the royal assent on 18 July 1973. The Act abolished the suspended Parliament of Northern Ireland and the post of Governor and made provision for a devolved administration consisting of an Executive chosen by the new Northern Ireland Assembly devised under the Sunningdale Agreement; the Assembly had already been created by the Northern Ireland Assembly Act 1973, passed two months earlier. "Status of Northern Ireland as part of United Kingdom" When the Republic of Ireland ceased to be a member of the British Commonwealth, Westminster had responded with the Ireland Act 1949. Amongst its other provisions, the Act had guaranteed that Northern Ireland would not cease to remain a part of the United Kingdom "without the consent of the Parliament of Northern Ireland" (s. 1(2)); this declaration had proven to be controversial both with the Irish government and with North ...
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