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Lincoln County, Kentucky
Lincoln County is a county located in south-central Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 24,275. Its county seat is Stanford. Lincoln County is part of the Danville, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area. History Lincoln County—originally Lincoln County, Virginia—was established by the Virginia General Assembly in June 1780, and named in honor of Revolutionary War general Benjamin Lincoln. It was one of three counties formed out of Virginia's Kentucky County (The other two were Fayette and Jefferson), and is one of Kentucky's nine original counties. The county's original seat was at Harrodsburg; but in 1785, Lincoln County was partitioned, and Harrodsburg became the seat of the new Mercer County. Afterward, Stanford became Lincoln County's permanent seat. Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (0.7%) is water. Lincoln County is located in south-central Kentucky astride the sou ...
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Benjamin Lincoln
Benjamin Lincoln (January 24, 1733 ( O.S. January 13, 1733) – May 9, 1810) was an American army officer. He served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Lincoln was involved in three major surrenders during the war: his participation in the Battles of Saratoga (sustaining a wound shortly afterward) contributed to John Burgoyne's surrender of a British army, he oversaw the largest American surrender of the war at the 1780 Siege of Charleston, and, as George Washington's second in command, he formally accepted the British surrender at Yorktown. Lincoln served from 1781 to 1783 as the first United States Secretary of War. While Secretary of War, Lincoln became an original member of The Society of the Cincinnati of the state of Massachusetts and was elected as the first president of the Massachusetts Society on June 9, 1783. After the war, Lincoln was active in politics in his native Massachusetts, running several times for lieutenan ...
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Partition (politics)
In politics, a partition is a change of political borders cutting through at least one territory considered a homeland by some community.Brendan O'LearyDEBATING PARTITION: JUSTIFICATIONS AND CRITIQUES Arguments for *historicist – that partition is inevitable, or already in progress * last resort – that partition should be pursued to avoid the worst outcomes (genocide or large-scale ethnic expulsion), if all other means fail * cost–benefit – that partition offers a better prospect of conflict reduction than the if existing borders are not changed * better tomorrow – that partition will reduce current violence and conflict, and that the new more homogenized states will be more stable * rigorous end – heterogeneity leads to problems, hence homogeneous states should be the goal of any policy Arguments against * national territorial unity will be lost * bi-nationalism and multi-nationalism are not undesirable * the impossibility of a just partition * difficult in de ...
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Casey County, Kentucky
Casey County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. Its county seat is Liberty. The county was formed in 1806 from the western part of Lincoln County and named for Colonel William Casey, a pioneer settler who moved his family to Kentucky in 1779. It is the only Kentucky county entirely in the Knobs region. Casey County is home to annual Casey County Apple Festival, and is a prohibition or dry county. It is considered part of the Appalachian region of Kentucky. History Casey County was established in 1806 from land given by Lincoln County. The third and present courthouse was built in 1889. In 2015, County Clerk Casey Davis received national press when he announced he would deny same-sex marriage licenses, as a show of solidarity with fellow county clerk Kim Davis, who was criticized and later jailed for doing the same thing in Rowan County, Kentucky.
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Pulaski County, Kentucky
Pulaski County is a county in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 65,034. Its county seat is Somerset. The county was founded in December 1798 from land given by Lincoln and Green Counties and named for Polish patriot Count Casimir Pulaski. Pulaski County comprises the Somerset, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area. Somerset's population is just over 11,000, but the Micropolitan Area for Somerset/Pulaski County is over 65,000. History In the early 2010s, after Lake Cumberland's water level rose to its normal level after its drastic fall (which caused a drought in Pulaski County's economy) and Somerset and Burnside went "wet", Pulaski County's economy began to grow exponentially due to tourism, mainly from Ohio. Downtown Burnside had become a ghost town during Lake Cumberland's decline, and has not fully recovered, although a few new businesses are popping up. Before the lake's decline, the Seven Gables Motel was a prominent motel in sout ...
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Rockcastle County, Kentucky
Rockcastle County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Mt. Vernon. The county was founded in 1810 and named for the Rockcastle River, which runs through it. The river, in turn, is named for its majestic rock cliffs. Rockcastle County is part of the Richmond– Berea, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Lexington-Fayette-Richmond- Frankfort, KY Combined Statistical Area. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (0.5%) is water. Adjacent counties National protected area * Daniel Boone National Forest (part) Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 16,582 people, 6,544 households, and 4,764 families residing in the county. The population density was . There were 7,353 housing units at an average density of . The racial makeup of the county was 98.81% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.24% Native America ...
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Garrard County, Kentucky
Garrard County ( ;) is a county located in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. As of the 2020 U.S. Census, the county's population was 16,953. Its county seat is Lancaster. The county was formed in 1796 and was named for James Garrard, Governor of Kentucky from 1796 to 1804. It is a prohibition or dry county, although its county seat, Lancaster, is wet. Lancaster was founded as a collection of log cabins in 1776 near a spring that later provided a constant source of water to early pioneers. It is one of the oldest cities in the Commonwealth. Boonesborough, 25 miles to the east, was founded by Daniel Boone in 1775. Lexington, 28 miles to the north, was founded in 1775. Stanford, originally known as St. Asaph, is 10 miles south of Lancaster. It too was founded in 1775. The oldest permanent settlement in Kentucky, Harrodsburg, was founded in 1774 and is 18 miles to the west. Garrard's present day courthouse is one of the oldest courthouses in Kentucky in continuous use. History Th ...
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Boyle County, Kentucky
Boyle County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 30,614. Its county seat is Danville. The county was formed in 1842 and named for John Boyle (1774–1835), a U.S. Representative, chief justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals , and later federal judge for the District of Kentucky, and is part of the Danville, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area. History In 1820, a portion of Casey County, now south of KY Route 300, was annexed to Mercer County. This became part of Boyle County when Boyle County was formed on February 15, 1842, from sections of Lincoln County and Mercer County. It is named for John Boyle, Congressman, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, and U.S. District Judge. Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States John Marshall Harlan, a supporter of civil rights and the sole dissenter in the Civil Rights Cases and Plessy v. Ferguson, was born in Boyle County in 1833. A courthou ...
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Appalachia
Appalachia () is a cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York State to northern Alabama and Georgia. While the Appalachian Mountains stretch from Belle Isle in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, to Cheaha Mountain in Alabama, ''Appalachia'' typically refers only to the cultural region of the central and southern portions of the range, from the Catskill Mountains of New York southwest to the Blue Ridge Mountains which run southwest from southern Pennsylvania to northern Georgia, and the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina. In 2020, the region was home to an estimated 26.1 million people, of which roughly 80% are white. Since its recognition as a distinctive region in the late 19th century, Appalachia has been a source of enduring myths and distortions regarding the isolation, temperament, and behavior of its inhabitants. Early 20th century writers often engaged in yellow journalism focused on sensationa ...
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Green River (Kentucky)
The Green River is a U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline dataThe National Map , accessed June 13, 2011 tributary of the Ohio River that rises in Lincoln County in south-central Kentucky. Tributaries of the Green River include the Barren River, the Nolin River, the Pond River and the Rough River. The river was named after Nathanael Greene, a general of the American Revolutionary War. History Following the Revolutionary War, many veterans staked claims along the Green River as payment for their military service. The river valley also attracted several vagrants, earning it the dubious nickname Rogue's Harbor. In 1842, the Green River was canalized, with a series of locks and dams being built to create a navigable channel as far inland as Bowling Green, Kentucky. Four locks and dams were constructed on the Green River, and one lock and dam was built on the Barren River, a tributary that passed through Bowling Green. During the Amer ...
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Pennyroyal Plateau
The Pennyroyal Plateau or Pennyroyal Region, often spelled Pennyrile, is a large physiographic region of Kentucky that features rolling hills, caves, and karst topography in general. It is named for a wild mint that grows in the area. It is also called the "Mississippian Plateau," for the Mississippian geologic age in which it was formed. The Pennyroyal is bordered by the Pottsville Escarpment in the east. The Pottsville Escarpment is the transition zone from the central part of Kentucky to the higher and geologically younger Cumberland Plateau in the eastern part of the state. The Pennyroyal is bordered on the north by Muldraugh Hill, the geological escarpment that forms the transition from the geologically older Bluegrass to the Pennyroyal. This is a series of knobs and ridges based on hard siltstones. The Pennyroyal is bordered on the west by the younger Jackson Purchase. The Pennyroyal is often thought by non-geologists to include the West Kentucky Coal Field of Penns ...
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Bluegrass Region
The Bluegrass region is a geographic region in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It makes up the central and northern part of the state, roughly bounded by the cities of Frankfort, Paris, Richmond and Stanford. The Bluegrass region is characterized by underlying fossiliferous limestone, dolomite, and shale of the Ordovician geological age. Hills are generally rolling, and the soil is highly fertile for growing pasture. Since the antebellum years, the region has been a center for breeding quality livestock, especially thoroughbred race horses. Since the late 20th century, the area has become increasingly developed with residential and commercial properties, particularly around Lexington, the business center. Although bluegrass music is popular throughout the region, the genre is indirectly named for the state rather than the region. History Before European-American settlement, various cultures of Indigenous peoples of the Americas adapted to the region. The region had mostly a ...
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Knobs Region
The Knobs Region or ''The Knobs'' is located in the US state of Kentucky. It is a narrow, arc-shaped region consisting of hundreds of isolated hills. The region wraps around the southern and eastern parts of the Bluegrass region in the north central to northeastern part of the state. The western end of the Knobs region begins near Louisville, Kentucky and continues southeastward through Bullitt, Hardin, Nelson, LaRue, Marion, Taylor, Boyle, Casey and Lincoln counties before turning northeast and running along the Pottsville Escarpment and the Appalachian Plateau. The Knob arc has a length of .The Kleber, John E., ed., ''Kentucky Encyclopedia'', University Press of Kentucky, 1992, pp. 521-2 Many of the hills are conical and up to several hundred feet high, some with capstones that form cliffs. The monadnocks formed from the eroding margins of the Pennyroyal Plateau to the south and the Cumberland Plateau to the east. The caprock is Mississippian Harrodsburg Limestone and ...
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