HOME
*



picture info

Land Of Oz
The Land of Oz is a magical country introduced in the 1900 children's novel '' The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow. Oz consists of four vast quadrants, the Gillikin Country in the north, Quadling Country in the south, Munchkin Country in the east, and Winkie Country in the west. Each province has its own ruler, but the realm itself has always been ruled by a single monarch. According to '' The Marvelous Land of Oz'', this monarch is Princess Ozma. Baum did not intend for ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' to have any sequels, but it achieved greater popularity than any of the other fairylands he created, including the land of Merryland in Baum's children's novel '' Dot and Tot in Merryland'', written a year later. Due to Oz's worldwide success, Baum decided to return to it four years after ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' was published. For the next two decades, he described and expanded upon the land in the Oz Books, a series w ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

List Of Oz Books
The Oz books form a book series that begins with '' The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' (1900) and relates the fictional history of the Land of Oz. Oz was created by author L. Frank Baum, who went on to write fourteen full-length Oz books. All of Baum's books are in the public domain in the United States. Even while he was alive, Baum was styled as "the Royal Historian of Oz" in order to emphasize the concept that Oz is an actual place. In his Oz books, Baum created the illusion that characters such as Dorothy and Princess Ozma relayed their adventures in Oz to Baum themselves, by means of a wireless telegraph. Original Oz books by L. Frank Baum Story compilations and other works by Baum In addition to the canonical Oz books, several of Baum's works that are not Oz stories are nevertheless nominally set in the same fictional universe as the Oz books, and include several character crossovers. These are: ''Queen Zixi of Ix'', '' The Magical Monarch of Mo'', ''The Sea Fairies'', ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Good Witch Of The North (Baum)
The Good Witch of the North, sometimes named Locasta or Tattypoo, is a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. She is the elderly and mild-mannered Ruler of the Gillikin Country. Her only significant appearance in Baum's work is in Chapter 2 of ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' (1900), in which she introduces Dorothy Gale to Oz and sends her to meet the Wizard, after placing a protective kiss on her forehead. She makes a brief cameo appearance at Princess Ozma's birthday party in ''The Road to Oz'' (1909), but is otherwise only mentioned elsewhere in the series. L. Frank Baum presented her as an extremely kind and gentle character who stood against the oppression and subjugation of people. She became the Ruler of the Gillikin Country in the North after freeing the Gillikins from the clutches of Mombi, the erstwhile Wicked Witch of the North. However, the character's kindness and magnanimity of spirit was not confined to her own domain, and ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




The Emerald City Of Oz
''The Emerald City of Oz'' is the sixth of L. Frank Baum's fourteen Land of Oz books. It was also adapted into a Canadian animated film in 1987. Originally published on July 20, 1910, it is the story of Dorothy Gale and her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em coming to live in Oz permanently. While they are toured through the Quadling Country, the Nome King is assembling allies for an invasion of Oz. This is the first time in the Oz series that Baum made use of double plots for one of the books. Baum had intended to cease writing Oz stories with this book, but financial pressures prompted him to write and publish ''The Patchwork Girl of Oz'', with seven other Oz books to follow. The book was dedicated to "Her Royal Highness Cynthia II of Syracuse" — actually the daughter (born in the previous year, 1909) of the author's younger brother Henry Clay "Harry" Baum. Plot summary At the beginning of this story, it is made quite clear that Dorothy Gale (the primary protagonist of many of the ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Dot And Tot Of Merryland
''Dot and Tot of Merryland'' is a 1901 novel by L. Frank Baum. After Baum wrote ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'', he wrote this story about the adventures of a little girl named Dot and a little boy named Tot in a land reached by floating on a river that flowed through a tunnel. The land was called Merryland and was split into seven valleys. The book was illustrated by artist W. W. Denslow, who had illustrated three previous Baum books. Unlike ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'', ''Dot and Tot of Merryland'' contained no tipped in color plates, but was filled with colored text illustrations. There were four full page pictures. The book is the last Baum book that was illustrated by W. W. Denslow. ''Dot and Tot of Merryland'' was first published by the Geo. M. Hill company of Chicago in 1901. Books of Wonder reprinted ''Dot and Tot of Merryland'' with minor text alterations and new illustrations by Donald Abbott. The reprint contains no color illustrations, but Mr. Abbott styled his af ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Merryland (Oz)
Merryland is a fictional region neighboring the Land of Oz, created by author L. Frank Baum. It is bordered by Noland and the twin kingdoms of Hiland and Loland. History Merryland is the setting of the 1901 children's novel ''Dot and Tot of Merryland''. Before Dot and Tot arrived, nobody had ever visited Merryland. Merryland has seven valleys and is ruled by Queen Dolly. Reception In ''Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum'', Michael O. Riley says that ''Dot and Tot of Merryland'' "is, in fact, one of Baum's weakest books, yet Merryland is one of his most charming, serene, and finished imaginary countries. The problem is one of balance: the fantasy world is strong but the story is not, and both elements too often seem to exist independently of each other." Points of interest The locations of Merryland are listed in order of appearance: * Stony Vale - An area at the border of Merryland that is guarded by the Watch-Dog of Merryland and serves as the entrance to Merryl ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


The Marvelous Land Of Oz
''The Marvelous Land of Oz: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman'', commonly shortened to ''The Land of Oz'', published in July 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baum's books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' (1900). This and the next 34 Oz books of the famous 40 were illustrated by John R. Neill. The book was made into an episode of '' The Shirley Temple Show'' in 1960, and into a Canada/Japan co-produced animated series of the same name in 1986. It was also adapted in comic book form by Marvel Comics; once in 1975 in the Marvel Treasury of Oz series, and again in an eight issue series with the first issue being released in November 2009. Plot elements from '' The Marvelous Land of Oz'' are included in the 1985 Disney feature film '' Return to Oz''. Plot summary The events are set shortly after the events in ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' and after Dorothy Gale's departure back to Kansas. The prot ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

William Wallace Denslow
William Wallace Denslow (; May 5, 1856 – March 29, 1915), professionally W. W. Denslow, was an American illustrator and caricaturist remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his illustrations of ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz''. Denslow was an editorial cartoonist with a strong interest in politics, which has fueled political interpretations of ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz''. Biography Born in Philadelphia to a tobacco wholesaler, Denslow spent brief periods at the National Academy of Design and the Cooper Union in New York, but was largely self-educated and self-trained. In the 1880s, he traveled about the United States as an artist and newspaper reporter; he came to Chicago for the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, and chose to stay. Denslow acquired his earliest reputation as a poster artist; he also designed books and bookplates, and was the first artist invited to work at the Roycroft Press. Denslow may have met Baum at the C ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Fantasy World
A fantasy world is a world created for/from fictional media, such as literature, film or games. Typical fantasy worlds involve magic or magical abilities, nonexistent technology and, sometimes, either a historical or futuristic theme. Some worlds may be a parallel world connected to Earth via magical portals or items (like Narnia); an imaginary universe hidden within ours (like Wizarding World); a fictional Earth set in the remote past or future (like Middle-earth); an alternative version of our History (like Lyra's world); or an entirely independent world set in another part of the universe (like the '' Star Wars'' Galaxy). Many fantasy worlds draw heavily on real world history, geography, sociology, mythology, and folklore. Plot function The setting of a fantasy work is often of great importance to the plot and characters of the story. The setting itself can be imperiled by the evil of the story, suffer a calamity, and be restored by the transformation the story brings ab ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language of the Indo-European language family, with its earliest forms spoken by the inhabitants of early medieval England. It is named after the Angles, one of the ancient Germanic peoples that migrated to the island of Great Britain. Existing on a dialect continuum with Scots, and then closest related to the Low Saxon and Frisian languages, English is genealogically West Germanic. However, its vocabulary is also distinctively influenced by dialects of France (about 29% of Modern English words) and Latin (also about 29%), plus some grammar and a small amount of core vocabulary influenced by Old Norse (a North Germanic language). Speakers of English are called Anglophones. The earliest forms of English, collectively known as Old English, evolved from a group of West Germanic (Ingvaeonic) dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century and further mutated by Norse-speaking Viking settlers starting in the 8th and 9 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Wicked Witch Of The West
The Wicked Witch of the West is a fictional character who appears in the classic children's novel ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' (1900), created by American author L. Frank Baum. In Baum's subsequent ''Oz'' novels, it is the Nome King who is the principal villain; the Wicked Witch of the West is rarely even referred to again after her death in the first book. The witch's most popular depiction was in the classic 1939 film based on Baum's novel, where she was portrayed by Margaret Hamilton. Hamilton's characterization introduced green skin and this has been continued in later literary and dramatic representations, including Gregory Maguire's revisionist ''Oz'' novel '' Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West'' (1995) and its musical stage adaptation ''Wicked'' (2003), the 2013 film ''Oz the Great and Powerful'', and the television series ''Once Upon a Time'' and ''Emerald City''. In Baum's books The Wicked Witch of the West is the malevolent ruler of the Wi ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Glinda The Good Witch
Glinda is a fictional character created by L. Frank Baum for his ''Oz'' novels. She first appears in Baum's 1900 children's classic ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'', and is the most powerful sorceress in the Land of Oz, ruler of the Quadling Country South of the Emerald City, and protector of Princess Ozma. Literature L. Frank Baum Baum's 1900 children's novel ''The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' refers to Glinda as the "Good Witch of the South"; she does not appear in the novel until late in its development. After the Wizard flies away in his balloon, the Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, Dorothy, and Toto travel South to the land of the Quadlings to ask Glinda for her advice.Baum, L. Frank, ''Wonderful Wizard of Oz'' (1900), Ch. 18 In the well-known 1939 film version, Glinda is a composite character with the Witch of the North. Later books call her a "Sorceress" rather than a "witch",Michael O. Riley, ''Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum'', p 104, though Baum ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Cowardly Lion
The Cowardly Lion is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. He is depicted as an African lion, but like all animals in Oz, he can speak. Since lions are supposed to be "The Kings of Beasts," the Cowardly Lion believes that his fear makes him inadequate. He does not understand that courage means acting in the face of fear, which he does frequently. Only during the aftermath of the Wizard's gift, when he is under the influence of an unknown liquid substance that the Wizard orders him to drink is he not filled with fear. He argues that the courage from the Wizard is only temporary, although he continues to do brave deeds. The cowardly lion is in fact brave, but he doubts himself. In many scenes in this classic book and film, the Lion shows bravery in the face of danger, similar to the Scarecrow, who wants a brain whilst he is the smartest one, and the Tin Man, who wants a heart but cries to his detriment when he does anything remotely mea ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]